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Full text of "Biennial report of the Board of Trustees of the State Agricultural College and Farm to the Governor of Iowa and the ... General Assembly"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/biennialreportofOOiowa 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01757 3392 



THIRD BIENNIAL REPOET 



GC 
977.7 
B477, 
1870 



OF THE 



BOARD OP TRUSTEES 



ST^TE ^aRIOTJLTXJRi^L 



COLLEGE AND FARM 



OOVERNOR OF IOWA 



AND THE 



THIRTEENTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



JANUARY, 1870. 



DES MOINES: 

F, M. MILLS, STATE PRINTER. 

1870. 



THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

ST^TE ^G3=lIOTJlLTURA.L 

COLLEGE AND FARM, 

TO THE 

aOVEKNOR OF IOWA 

AND THE 

THIRTEENTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



JANUARY, 1870. 



DES MOINES; 

F. M. MILLS, STATE PRINTEB. 
1870. 



IOWA STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, ) 
Ames, Iowa, January 10, 1870. ) 

To His Excellency, Samuel Merrill, Governor : 

In accordance with the provisions of the statute defining the duties 
of the " Board of Trustees of the Iowa State Agricultural College 
and Farm," I have the honor to submit herewith the reports of the 
several officers of the Board, and of the different committees 
appointed by the Board, which together constitute the report of the 
Board of Trustees, and contain full and complete statements of all 
transactions of the Board. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

H. M. THOMSON, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



M' Officio -Uoif. A. S. WELCH, Ames. 

M- Officio— GOY. SAMUEL MERRILL, Des Moines. 

1st District— O. H. P. BTJCHANA.N, Mt. Pleasant ; Term expires May 1, 1873. 

2d District— Hon. J. D. WRIGHT, Cliariton ; Term expires May 1, 1872. 

M District— J AWEIB H. WOODBURY, Leon ; Term expires May 1 1872. 

Ath District— J. C. CUSEY, Dakota ; Term expires May 1, 1870. 

5^;^ District— B.o:^(. OLIVER MILLS,* Lewis; Term expires May 1, 1870. 

&h District-r-ILoN. T. A. MORGAN, Webster ; Term expires May 1, 1870. 

1th District— 'Rots. C. E. LEFFINGWELL, Wheatland; Term expires May 1, 1872. 

m District— Ron. JOHN RUSSELL, Wyoming ; Term expires May 1, 1870. 

m District— Ron. PETER MELENDY, Cedar Falls ; Term expires May 1, 1872. 
lOth District— Ron. R. A. RICHARDSON, Ulyria; Term expires May 1, 1872. 
,11^^ District— Ron. B. F. GUE, Fort Dodge ; Term expires May 1, 1870. 
12th District— Ron. R. W. HUMPHREY, Charles City ; Term expires May 1, 1870. 

* Elected to fill vacancy occasioned by the death of Dr. T. K. Brooks. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Hon. a. S. WELCH, President. 
Hon. HUGH M. THOMSON, Secretary. 
Hon. S. E. RANKIN, Treasurer. 
Pkof. GEO. W. JONES, Cashier. 



LAND AGENTS. 
Hon. GEO. W. BASSETT, THOMAS J. STONE, 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Hon. JOHN RUSSELL, Hon. R. W. HUMPHREY, Hon. B. F. GUE. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

Hon. JOHN RUSSELL, Hon. R. W. HUMPHREY, Hon. B. F. GUE. 

COMMITTEE ON ORGANIZATION AND FACULTY. 
Hon. B. F. GUE, Hon. PETER MELENDY, Hon. JOHN RUSSELL, 
Hon. a. S. WELCH, President. 



FACULTY. 



Hon. a. 8. WELCH, M. A., 

PKESIDENT. 

GEORGE. W. JONES, M. A., 

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS. 

Hon. NORTON S. TOWNSHEND, M. D., 

PROFESSOR OF PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE. 

ALBERT E. FOOTE, M. D., 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY. 

O. H. St. JOHN, B. S., 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY. (NOT ON DUTY.) 

Mrs. CATHERINE S. POTTER, 

MATRON. 

Miss AUGUSTA MATHEWS., 

TEACHER OF PIANO MUSIC. 

Miss LILLIE BEAUMONT, 

TEACHER OF THE FRENCH AND GERMAN LANGUAGES. 



Hon. HUGH M. THOMSON, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE FARM. 



[No. 16.] 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT. 



IOWA STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, j. 

Ames, Story County, Iowa, January 10, 1870. f 

To THE Board of Trustees. 

Gentlemen : In the plan of organization of the Iowa State 
Agricultural College, adopted November 21, 1868, jou require that 
the President shall make an annual report to the Trustees on the 
condition and progress of the college, together with his views as to 
the additional facilities needful for its further development, and 
embodying the reports of other officers in their various departments. 

The first regular year of the College was opened March 17th, 
1869. On the same day the college building was dedicated and 
the officers inaugurated with appropriate exercises. Addresses by 
Hon. John Scott, Hon B. F. Gue, Hon. John Hussell, Prof. 
Parker, Dr. Townshend and the President, were given before a 
crowded audience gathered from all parts of the State. A copy of 
these addresses, published by order of the Board, is hereby trans- 
mitted for preservation in the archives of the College. 

On the two following days, March 18th and 19th, applicants for 
admission were classified by written examinations in local geography, 
arithmetic, English grammar, reading and spelling, and those who 
were found proficient in these branches were enrolled in the college 
class. Others whose progress in the above studies fell below the 
required standard, but was still sufficient to enable them in all proba- 
bility to enter college after a year's study, were classified in the 
preparatory department. A few who had never studied English 
grammar and had made litde advancement in geography and arithme- 
tic were rejected. 

The two departments thus organinzed rapidly increased in number, 



8 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



until in less than a month after the opening every available room in, 
the college building was filled. From this date to the end of the 
term which closed on the 3d of July, eight students were admitted to 
fill vacancies caused by the departure of a similar number on account 
of sickness and other serious reasons. During the same period 
twenty-two applicants were refused for want of room. 

Of the students enrolled in the Freshmen Class of college, the 



first term, there were — 

Young men 77 

Young ladies 16 

Total in Freshmen Class 93 

Number admitted to the Preparatory Department- 
Young men 59 

Young ladies , 21 

Total in Preparatory Department 80 

Total number 173 

Students rooming out of College building 15 

Students rooming in College building 158 

Total students in attendance » 173 

"Whole uumber of young men first term 136 

Whole number of young ladies first terni 37 

Total in attendance, first term 173 

Number enrolled in Freshmen Class second term — 

Young men 63 

Young ladies 15 

Total in Freshman Class 78 

Number in Preparatory Department, second term — 

Young men 63 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTUKAL COLLEGE. 



9 



Young ladies 27 



Total in Preparatory Department 



90 



Total number 168 

Number rooming out of College building.. 9 

JTumber rooming in College building 159 

Total students in attendance 168 

Whole number young men, second term 126 

Whole number young ladies, second term 42 

Total in attendance, second term , , . . 168 



Wiaole number of different students during the year. 192 

Fifty-five counties were represented in the College during the 
year, as follows : 



Benton ...... 11 

Black Hawk 4 

Boone 16 

Buchanan 3 

Butler 3 

Carroll 2 

Cass 2 

Cedar 2 

Chickasaw 1 

Clayton . 3 

Clinton 5 

Dallas 4 

Davis 1 

Delaware 2 

Des Moines 2 

Dubuque 5 

Fayette 2 

Floyd 2 

Green 2 

Grundy 1 

2 



Hamilton 2 

Henry 2 

Harrison . , - - T 

Hardin , 2 

Hancock 2 

Humboldt 2 

Iowa 2 

Jasper 2 

Jefferson 1 

Johnson 4 

Jones.. 5 

Keokuk 1 

Linn 2 

Louisa 2 

Lucas 2 

Mahaska 2 

Marion 2 

Marshall 1 

Monona 2 

Muscatine 3 



10 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



Polk 

Pottawattamie. 
Poweshiek . . . 

Scott 

Story * 

Tama 

Yan Buren . . , 



4 
1 
1 
4 
29 
2 
3 



Wapello 
Warren , 
Webster 



Winneshiek 
Winnebago. 
Woodbury . 
Wright 



15 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 



Total 



192 



*Of the twenty-nine students from Story county, fifteen had rooms in the college 
building, and fourteen were day scholars. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



DEPABTMENT OP AGRICULTURE. 



DEPARTMENT OP MECHANIC ARTS. 



FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Algebra. 

Physical Geography. 

Rhetoric. 

Book-keeping. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geometry. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 
English Language aucl Literature. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Trigonometry, Mensuration and Surveying. 

General Chemistry. 

Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

SECOND TERM. 

Meclianics. 



Analytical Chemistry, 
Zoology, Practical Agriculture. 



Analytical Geometry. 
Descriptive Geometry. 



THIRD YEARx 



FIRST TERM. 



Analysis of Soils. 

Entomology, Practical Agriculture. 
Botany, Horticulture and Forestry. 



Mechanics of Engineering. 
Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 
Differential and Integral Calculus* 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



11 



SECOND TERM. 

Chemical Physics. 

Geology and Mineralogy. Mechanics of Engineering. 

Comparative Anatomy and Physiology. Machine Drawing. 

Practical Agriculture. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Agricultural Chemistry. . History and Principles of Architecture. 

Landscape Gardening. Architectural Drawing. 

Rural Architecture. Carpentry and Masonry. 

Political Economy and Logic. 

SECOND TERM. 

Mental Philosophy. 
Constitutional Law. 

Veterinary Science and Art. Civil Engineering 

The French and German Languages, Music and Free-hand Drawing are 
optional studies throughout the course. 

FACULTY. 

HON. A. S. WELCH, M. A., President— salary $ 3000 

GEORGE W. JONES, M. A., Professor of Mathematics— sal- 
ary 2000 

HON. NORTON S. TOWNSHEND, M . D., Professor of 

Practical Agriculture — salary 2000 

ALBERT E. FOOTE, M. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

salary 1500 

O. H. ST. JOHN, B. S., Assistant Professor of Geology, not on 
duty 

MRS. CATHERINE [S. POTTER, Matron— salary 600 and board 

MISS AUGUSTA MATHEWS, Teacher of Piano Music- 
salary 500 and board 

MISS LILLIE BEAUMONT, Teacher of the French and Ger- 
man languages — salary 500 and board 

HON. HUGH M. THOMSON, Superintendent of the Farm— [State, 
salary 1000 paid by 

The following additional Professors will be appointed under the 
organization contemplated : 

A Professor of Human Physiology, Hygiene and Physical 
Culture. 

A Professor of English Language and Literature. 



12 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo.16. 



A Professor of Political Economy and Constitutional Law. 

A Professor of Logic and Psychology. 

A Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 

A Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

A Professor of Chemistry, General and Analytical. 

A Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

A Professor of Physics and Mechanics. 

A Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Architecture. 

A Professor of Civil Engineering. 

A Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching. 

A Professor of Military Engineering. 

A Professor of the French and German Languages. 

A Professor of Yocal and Instrumental Music. 

An Instructor in Drawing. 

A Preceptress, who will also instruct in Domestic Economy and 
Household duties. 

NON-RESIDENT PROFESSORS. 

Besides the regular working force, the trustees have adopted the 
views of the committee on organization, in appointing men eminent 
in science and the arts, to deliver courses of lectures before the 
students and such citizens as desire to attend. Six of these non- 
resident professorships have, I learn, already been filled by the 
selection of distinguished gentlemen from difi'erent institutions of 
the country. 

Inasmuch as the Sophomore class will have the study of 
Botany the first term and the study of mechanics the sec 
end term of the next year, it is urgent that a professor or instruct- 
or of botany and horticulture, and a professor of phjsics and 
mechanics should be elected. I also respectfully ask that a 
matron or preceptress be provided for the next year. 

I respectfully recommend the election of a steward to take charge 
of the kitchen and dining room and to purchase supplies. 



Ko. 16.1 AGRICULTUEAL COLLEGE. I3 

The following classes were taught during the year : 

CLASSES OF THE FIRST TERM. 

Taught by the President — Rhetoric 96 

Landscape Gardening 5 

German 34 

Taught by Prof. Jones— Algebra 89 

Arithmetic 82 

Bookkeeping 84 

Taught by Dr. Townshend— Physical Geography 43 

Local Geography 80 

Taught by Dr. Foote — English Grammar 48 

Analysis 37 

Taught by Miss Mathews — Instrumental Music 22 

Taught by Mr. T. L. Thomipson — English Grammar 23 

Taught by Miss E. M. Bell— Arithmetic 22 

CLASSES OF THE SECOND TERM. 

Taught by the President — Kames' Elements of Criticism 47 

Kormal Class. 100 

Taught by Prof. Jones — Geometry 71 

Intellectual Arithmetic and Algebra. 62 

Taught by Dr. Townshend— Botany 81 

Physiology 37 

Taught by Dr. Foote — " Physiology 40 

Natural Philosophy 32 

Taught by Miss Beaumont — German 83 

English Grammar 24 

Spelling 27 

Taught by Miss Mathews — Instrumental Music 26 

Taught BY Miss E. M. Bell— Arithmetic... 40 

Taught by Mr. T. L. Thompson— English Grammar 23 



14 



AGRICULTUKAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. le. 



RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Becaose of the distance of the churches in Ames it was found 
necessary to give regular Sabbath instruction in the college. In 
the absence of any provision for Sabbath preaching, it was thought 
best to invite the clergymen of the different denominations on the 
line of railroad, from Marshalltown to Montana inclusive, to preach 
by turns in the college chapel on Sunday. Some twenty Sundays 
were supplied in this way. The remaining Sundays of the college 
year were filled by Dr. Townshend and myself alternately. Du- 
ring the last term the exercises of Sunday were as follows : 

11 A. M , Bible teaching. 12 M., sacred music. Prayer meet- 
ing at 7 P. M., in all of which attendance was voluntary. Preach- 
ing at 3 P. M., attendance required. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The government sustained in the Agricultural College has in 
view two objects — 

Ist. The uniform maintenance of such order, quiet and system 
that the attention of the student may never be diverted from the 
matter in hand whether it be study, recitation or manual labor. 

2nd. The reflexive effect on the governed, namely, the attain- 
ment of self control, good taste, courtesy, love of propriety, regard 
for others' rights, and a wholesome, habitual respect for law ; in 
short, all the social and civil virtues. 

The first of these objects employs good government as an aid in 
the furtherance of the enterprise in all its branches. The second 
applies it as an educating force that is quite as productive of indi- 
vidual progress in a college course as study, or recitation, or lec- 
tures. 

The first object is far more easily attained than the second, and 
for this reason I am able to report that the institution has made 
more decided advancement in it. The students as a body have 
shown a steady and hearty sympathy with ths government in its 
plans, policy and purpose. There has been throughout the year 
a degree of regularity, promptness, and cheerful obedience, which 
I have never seen surpassed in any institution. 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



15 



As to the second object I am glad to say that we have reached 
such results in numerous individual cases as to give great encour- 
agement for the future. Many of our pupils have proved, as seems 
to me, the genuineness of the system of government which we 
adopted by the growth they have made in the higher qualities of 
character under its influence. This moulding power found in a sal- 
utary control, weak in the earlier days of our institution grows 
stronger as the years pass. It attains its highest development 
when self-government supercedes that of the officers. In this di- 
rection an interesting experiment was made the last term, with 
results that seemed to me remarkable. The maintenance of disci- 
pline in the rooms and halls was entrusted solely to the students. 
At the opening of the college the entire body had been divided 
into seven sections, two of ladies and five of gentlemen, the sec- 
tions corresponding with the halls in which they roomed. Each 
section had, under instructions, chosen a captain and lieutenant, 
the captain to keep order in his section during study hours, and to 
report every morning to the president, and the lieutenant to act 
in a similar manner in the absence of the captain. This system of 
limited selt government which had been in successful operation 
from the beginning had paved the way for the complete self-gov- 
ernment that was to follow. Early in the last term it was suggest- 
ed to the students that they assume the entire control of all matters 
pertaining to order in their rooms and halls. The suggestion was 
accepted at once. They had already their executive officers, cap- 
tain and lieutenant above referred to. Each section met, and with- 
out delay adopted the rules for order in the rooms and halls 
hitherto in force and under the advice of the president, elected a 
judicial officer. Seven such officers were consequently chosen, two 
ladies and five gentlemen, who together constituted what was call- 
ed the council. The council organized by selecting a president and 
a clerk, the former to preside at all meetings, the latter to record 
the daily report made to him by the captain of each section on the 
conduct of his section the preceeding day and to present the record 
60 made, to the council at their regular meeting. The council met 
twice a week, listened to the reading of the record alluded to, and 
if any offences were reported therein, called the offender before 



16 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



them, tried him if the offence was serious and if found guilty in- 
flicted a suitable punishment. 

The eiFect of this experiment in self-government on the improve- 
ment in the order of the rooms and halls was immediate, striking, 
and permanent. General confidence in the council continued with- 
out abatement throughout the term. Only one appeal was made to 
the faculty, and that was withdrawn. Indeed such was the steady 
success of the whole scheme that that most perplexing question which 
has been discussed everywhere and settled nowhere, viz : how best 
to govern college dormitories, seemed at last to have found its solu- 
tion. If so, it ought to revolutionize college government. At all 
events it has done so here. I have dwelt with some minuteness on 
this new movement, both because of its interesting character and 
because of its important bearing on the welfare of the college 
hereafter. 

DAY'S EMPLOYMENT. 

The following is the division of the day's employments. The 
students rose promptly on a signal from the bell at half past five, 
and put their rooms in order. They then engaged in study till 
quarter to seven, the hour for breakfast. At quarter before eight 
the officers and pupils assembled in the chapel, and the daily ses- 
sion for recitations and lectures was opened with devotional exer- 
cises. The session occupied five hours, and closed at quarter to 
one. It was divided int(^ five portions of fifty minutes each for 
recitations, with short intervals between them for the movement of 
classes. The exercises of the session were so arranged that every 
student in either department spent three hours in receiving instruc- 
tion, and had two hours of uninterrupted study in his room. At 
quarter to one the captains of the " working squads," thirteen in 
number, met in the President's office, and received special orders as 
to work laid out for the afternoon. That no mistakes might be 
made respecting these orders, they were reduced to writing and read 
by the officer of the week, at the dinner table. The dinner bell 
struck at one o'clock. At quarter to two the " work bell " called 
the students to their allotted labors. The young women repaired in 
regular order to the laundry, the bakery, or the dining room, to do 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTUKAL COLLEGE. 



17 



tlie work assigned by the matron, while the young men gathered in 
squads on the terrace, received the proper tools from their captains, 
and went to their work cheerfully and promptly, whether it was on 
the drain, on the ornamental grounds, in the field, the garden or the 
orchard. Generally at quarter to five, but sometimes half an hour 
earlier, the work hours closed, and amusements began. These con- 
sisted of vigorous games of base ball by the various " clubs," of 
milder games of croquet by boys and girls together, and of such 
other plays as are morally and physically healthful. Tea terminated 
these sports usually at quarter past six ; at seven each pupil obeyed 
the signal bell for study hours, by retiring to his or her room and 
studying quietly till ten (if needful,) when the retiring bell sounded, 
the books were closed, the lights extinguished, and the day's work 
was done. I may add there was an exception to this regularity of 
the work hours in the ladies' department. The necessities of the 
kitchen and dining-room required that a squad of girls (six) should 
be employed there in the evening, and these consequently had their 
stu'ly hours In the afternoon. Moreover, a few young men had du- 
ties at difi'erent hours, such as the bell-ringer, the keeper of the 
store room, the superintendent of the dining-room, and the mail 
carrier. 

MANUAL LABOR AND ITS RESULTS. 

Many looked upon the introduction of regular manual labor into 
the Iowa Agricultural College with forebodings of evil. It had failed 
either partially or wholly in many similar institutions of the East. 
It had been tried by experienced educators and sooner or later 
abandoned. It had failed under circumstances seemingly as favora- 
ble as one could wish. For this reason not a few even of the friends 
of industrial education predicted that it would prove with us an ele- 
ment of weakness rather than of strength. But never was prophecy 
of evil farther from its fulfillment. Whatever the re><ults of the 
introduction of manual labor in other Institutions, here it has been 
thus far a gratifying success. The afternoon's work was always as 
cheerfully accepted as the forenoon's recitations, and its influence on 
the health, progress, and conduct, of our pupils was in the highest 
3 



18 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16 



degree salutary. Indeed it is my conviction that we could never 
carry our number undiminished through the summer term without 
manual labor. It gives needful exercise and bodily vigor, imparts 
skill in the use of tools, helps the student to defray a portion of ^his 
current expenses, applies science to practice, and promotes respect 
for honorable toil. From the experience of the past year and the 
convictions of a lifetime, I have full faith in the wisdom of the law 
that requires manual labor from every student, and I believe that 
such a requirement is indispensable to the prosperity of an Industrial 
Scho'ol. 

ORGANIZATION FOR MANUAL LABOR. 

The following arrangement for daily labor was found to be most 
effective. The students were divided into squads of six and each 
squad elected a captain from its own number. In almost every 
iastance the student most experienced in farm work was chosen. 
The squads were all reorganized once a month, and the captain 
held office for that time. Generally, however, the captain was 
re-elected. This monthly re-organization, while it left most squads 
unchanged, gave opportunity to correct possible abuses or want of 
harmony among those who worked together. It was the duty of 
the captain to see that his men were on hand at the required time, 
to receive the necessary tools from the foreman of the tool-room, 
to take care that these tools were cleaned and restored at the close 
of the work hours, to supervise and instruct his squad in case a 
foreman was not present, and in such case also to report in writing 
to the President the time, quality, kind, and value, of the work 
done that day by each member of his squad. 

Besides the captains, it was found necessary, because of the 
paucity of professors in the college, to appoint a few students of 
character and experience as foremen to take charge of one or 
several squads working together as occasion might require. The 
following young men held this responsible office : Wm. Wells, Jr. 
P. S. Brown, O. M. Schee, C. P. Wellman. 

The foreman's duty was to take charge of two or more squads 
on any single job ; to give instruction and correct bad habits ; to 
see that the work in hand was done thoroughly and well, and 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



19 



report to the President over against the name of each worker 
the time, quality, kind and value, of his work. When a 
single squad was engaged on any job, the captain acted as foreman, 
and simple justice compels me to say that not only the regular 
foremen, but the captains acting occasionally as such, were very 
attentive, prompt and faithful. 

SUPERVISION OF DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR. 

While the above mentioned officers (all students) supervised 
squads at work, each of the officers of the college had charge of a 
special department of labor. 

Dr. Foote had oversight of the students' rooms and furniture. 
He was also engaged a part of the season in making and preserv- 
ing a complete collection of plants that grow in this vicinity. 

Prof. Jones, as cashier and book-keeper, had charge of the ac- 
counts of the college and paid all bills made, on the order of the 
president. He held himself ready, also, in any emergency, to push 
forward any out of door enterprise which was specially urgent. 
The digging of cellars for professors' houses and a part of the work 
on the college drains was under his immediate supervision. 

Dr. Townshend had the special management of the garden and 
young orchard. He gave personal attention to these in the after- 
noon, reported to the president daily the progress of the work and 
stated the number of students necessary for help on the following 
day. 

The management of the Farm and consequently of all student^s 
labor connected therewith, were under the care and supervision of 
Hon. H. M. Thomson, the Farm Superintendent. Mr. Thomson^ 
early in the season made a complete statement to the President in 
writing of his plans for farm improvement and the raising of cropsy 
and thereafter to the date of his resignation sent in daily written 
reports specifying the jobs of work on hand for the day and the 
number of students required for them. Mr. Thomson also super- 
vised personally the squads at work on the farm whenever the onier- 
ous duty of buying supplies for the college did not prevent. 

The President had the general management of all the work. He 
organized the squads, appointed the foremen with the advice of the 



20 



AGRICULTUKAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



professors, received their daily reports, detailed squads to labor on 
the various jobs as needed, and gave special personal attention to the 
work on the ornamental grounds. 

Mrs. Potter, the Matron, arranged the squads of young ladies for 
the work of the dining-room, kitchen, laundry and bakery. With n 
the help of the Superintendent of the kitchen and dining-room, she 
planned a system of rotation by which every girl had practice in each 
of these departments of labor. She also detailed daily the various 
squads to meet the necessities of the day, and presented to the Presi- 
dent at its close a tabular statement giving for record the time, qual- 
ity, and rate per hour, of each girl's work. Mrs. Potter had more- 
over special charge of the laundry during most of the last term. 

EDUCATIONAL RESULTS OF MANUAL LABOR. 

I have already said that the effect of regular manual labor on 
the students has been thus far salutary in a high degree. It has 
furnished the proper amount of healthful exercise and thus pre- 
served that balance between the activities of the intellect and 
muscle which constitutes a sound mind in a sound body, but it 
must be confessed that its results as an educating force have not 
been as yet quite satisfactory. The truth is, it will require some 
years to realize the highest results of manual labor in this direc- 
tion. At the opening of the first term there gathered at the 
College one hundred and fifty students, each of whom was required 
by law to labor two and a half hours average a day throughout 
the college year. Over thirty of these were young women and 
there was no -difficulty in giving to them such work as is properly 
instructive in the art of house-keeping. But it was impossible to 
rfurnish a hundred and thirty young men and boys (equal perhaps 
to a force of twenty all-day laborers) such work for two and a half 
hours a day as would be directly instructive in the nicer processes 
of the garden, the farm, or the orchard. The trees for the new 
orchard were still in th-e nursery, and the grounds for a garden 
were yet to be selected. The farm had many valuable improve- 
ments, but much heavy work remained to be done before it could 
be called a imodel an<i experimental farm, except by courtesy. 
There was indeed enough to do. The grounds around the building 



No, 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



21 



were to be put into lawD, the terrace to be built, roads to be 
made, ornamental trees to be set out, grading to be done, cellars 
to be prepared for the new houses, a large sewer to be dug for 
draining the college building, many acres of woodland to be 
cleared of under-brush, fuel to be cut, ten acres of garden to be 
cultivated, an orchard to be laid out, planted, and cared for, fences 
to be made, the farm crops to be raised and gathered. All these 
and much more gave promise of work enough for all, but it was 
quite clear that the rough jobs that require muscle were greatly in 
excess of the artistic jobs that require skill. This condition of 
things, which was unavoidable in the outset, while it prevented us 
from making experts in many of the scientific processes of farming 
and gardening, it enabled us at any rate to fulfill the requirements 
of the law. Moreover it was our constant aim to enable our 
, pupils to realize for themselves all the higher values of manual 
labor of whatever sort. We were able to give some practical 
instruction to many in the operations of the garden and the field, 
in the laying out of grounds, in the planting and culture of trees, 
and the making of lawns and roads ; but whatever might be the 
character of the work in hand, we were able to inculcate upon 
all, such prime virtues of industry as punctuality, promptness, 
steadiness of purpose and effort, wholesome respect for labor, and 
the habit of doing well what is worth doing at all. It is some- 
thing to have accomplished these results, and something more to 
have made a beginning in the'thorough system of instruction in the 
handicrafts which, as the professors increase in number and the 
farm improves, we shall one day reach. 

VALUE OF STUDENTS' LABOR TO THE COLLEGE. 

The law declares that students shall labor three hours a day in 
summer and two in winter at the rate of from three to ten cents an 
hour. Tbe Trustees in applying the law decided that labor should 
be required two hours a day during the months of March, April, 
October, and November, and three hours a day during the months 
May, June, July, August, and* September. It is found by trial 
that students laboring three consecutive hours will accomplish 
nearly twice as much as when laboring only two hours. I would 



22 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



therefore recommend that the law be so modified as to require 
manual labor three hours a day, four days in the week, during 
March, April, October, and ITovember, and three hours a day for 
five days in the week, during May, June, July, August, and Sep- 
tember. The results of such an arrangement would be more fa- 
vorable to the institution, and quite satisfactory to the students 
themselves. 

It is yet too early to say with certainty whether the proceeds of 
the student's labor fully reimburse the College for the money 
invested in it at present rates of payment. The obstacles inci- 
dent to every new enterprise, the want of a complete supervising 
force, and the frequent and heavy rains of the past year, make 
it a poor criterion for settling so momentous a question. 
"When an increased number of professors shall enable us to carry 
out the system already devised in all its details, I verily believe 
the returns from student's labor will fully equal the amount paid 
for it. In other words, it is my conviction that when all possible 
appliances for its success in the College are rightly employed, 
manual labor will be uniformly self-sustaining. Even the ex- 
periment of the year that has closed, though hindered by all 
those frictions to which new machinery is liable, goes far to 
prove this conclusion correct. For it is the judgment of those 
who ought to know best, that some of the heaviest jobs begun and 
finished by students the first year, would not have cost less if the 
work had been done by ordinary laborers at usual wages. 

It was computed for example that the sewer necessary for draining 
the college building would if laid with brick and completed by 
ordinary labor cost §1200. The ditch for this sewer was dug mainly 
by volunteers from among the students, at an expense of $416. The 
sewer is nearly finished and its cost will not much exceed the first 
estimate. Still undoubtedly there were smaller jobs which on account 
of the reasons I have mentioned, cost more than if done by regular 
laborers paid at ordinary rates. 

The limits of this report will not permit a detailed description of 
the improvements made by student's* labor during the year. A few 
of them however may be noticed as examples, while a more minute 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



23 



account of farm work will be left to the report of Hon. H. M. Thom- 
son, Superintendent of the Farm. 

The sewer above mentioned consists of a hollow cylinder of brick 
made for the purpose laid in mortar. It is over eighty rods long, 
and its interior diameter is twenty-six inches. It lies everywhere 
below frost, and in many places runs eight or ten feet below the 
surface. It has suflScient descent, and its capacity is such that it 
will serve for the drainage of all the buildings hereafter erected on 
the college grounds. It is now connected with the college cellar 
by tiles, and with the kitchen, bakery and laundry by iron pipes, so 
that though not quite finished at the lower end, it is ready for 
use when the next term opens. 

IMPROVEMENTS MADE UPON THE ORNAMENTAL GROUNDS. 

The terrace in front of the college building is eighty-nine feet 
wide by one hundred and ninety-eight feet long, and an average of 
three feet high. Its three sides are neatly turfed, its surface cov- 
ered with gravel, and finished with a border suitable for the plant- 
ing of shrubbery next spring. 

About five hundred evergreens and deciduous trees were planted 
in a variety of groups on the ornamental grounds. All of them 
lived and grew thriftily. 

Five hundred young forest trees, selected in the woods early in 
the summer, were trenched around and had their roots cut back 
with the spade, so that the fibrous roots which this treatment com- 
pels them to throw out, might prepare them for being transplanted 
the coming spring safely and successfully. 

A road was built from the Farm House to the College sixteen 
feet wide, by sixty-eight rods in length. Where it crosses low 
ground, some ten rods, it was piked, pierced with a culvert, and 
heavily graded. The ren^ainder of the way it was constructed by 
removing the turf and top soil six inches in depth and filling up 
the excavation to the height of a foot in the center with gravel 
and cement from the fallen buildings. It is a solid piece of work, 
and with a little care will last through generations. 

A similar road eighteen feet wide is nearly finished from the 
•south end of the terrace to the creek, seventy- three rods, and forms 



24 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

a portion of the permanent approach from the public highway to 
the College. It will be completed the entire distance early next 
term. An appropriation of $1,000 will be needed for the improve- 
ment of the ornamental grounds for the ensuing two years. 

The following statement, made by the book-keeper, shows the 
sums paid by the college for every job on which the students were 
employed during the year. It will be seen that the amount paid 
for labor the last term greatly exceeds the amount paid the first 
term. The reason of this was the more favorable weather and the 
greater pressure of work. 



STUDENTS' LABOR, 1869, CHARGED TO THE FOLLOWING 

ACCOUNTS: 





SPRING 
TERM. 


FALL 
TERM. 


TOTAL 


Farm Labor— work on crops, about barn, stock, etc. . 


$252.33 


$534.59 


$786.92 


Garden — culture of vegetables for College table 


98.75 ■ 


198.35 


297.10 




146.17 


270.17 


416.34 






7.74 


7.74 




37.96 


222.94 


260.90 




44,84 


88.85 


133.69 






6.23 


6.23 


Incidental Expenses — book-keeping, janitors work, 










395.92 


545.82 


941.74 


Farm Improvements — principally fence-building 


79.96 


25.94 


105.90 






161.82 


161.82 




34.19 


45.84 


80.03 




60.95 


22.08 


83.03 


Ornamental Grounds — planting, care of trees, etc 


122.26 


13.78 


136.04 




87.57 


3.95 


91.52 




278.01 


576.22 


854.23 




39.90 


3.70 


43.60 




33.76 


5.12 


38.88 






18.12 


18.12 




12.16 


66.65 


78.81 






17.52 


17.52 


Cabinet — help in arrangement 


2.85 


30.29 


33.14 






3.20 


3.20 




1.15, 


1.15 




$1728.73 






% 


2868.93, 





Total for the year $4597.65 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



25 



FURTHER PROVISIONS NEEDED FOR STUDENTS' LABOR. 

After all, the greatest obstacle to the success of manual labor 
will be found in the want of employment enough to meet the re- 
quirements of the law. It will be difficult to furoish sufficient 
work for all, unless our facilities in this direction are greatly in- 
creased. There are two means of meeting this difficulty, both im- 
portant. 

Ist. To purchase three or four hundred acres of land at conve- 
nient distance for grazing and raising hay, and thus enable us 
to extend the area of the cultivated fields on the college farm. The 
act by which the Congressional grant of lands was made, confers 
upon the Trustees the right, under authority from the State Legis- 
lature, to invest one-tenth of the interest arising from the sale of 
such lands, in the purshase of a college farm. Beyond question, 
the right thus conferred extends also to the purchase of additional 
lands for the enlargement of the farm, when found inadequate ot 
the wants of the college. I respectfully urge therefore that the Le- 
gislature be asked to pass an act, authorizing such a purchase, and 
that the executive committee be directed, on the passage of such 
an act, to make such additions to the college farm as in their judg- 
ment its needs require. 

2nd. To build a work shop large enough for the accommoda- 
tion of students who take the course in mechanic arts. I hazard 
nothing in saying that with such a shop, together with a compe- 
tent instructor and foreman, the young men could do all the car* 
penter and joiner work needed on the farm, even to the finishing 
of dwelling houses and other necessary buildings. This necessity 
for a work shop is very urgent. I earnestly commend it to the 
attention of the board, and suggest that an appropriation of $5000 
be asked for this purpose. 

Something will be gained next year by dismissing the hire^ 
teamsters who were the only outside employes retained on the farm 
last term, and supplying their places with students. This can be 
done by holding an afternoon session for the recitations of the 
freshmen class, and giving them opportunity to work in the fore- 
noon. Such an arrangement will supply about an equal number of 
4 



26 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



squads for each division of the day, not onlj furnishiDg drivers 
for the teams but that continuous help so essential to the success of 
the garden and the farm. 

OBJECTS TO BE GAINED IN MANUAL LABOR. 

As it is the purpose of our college instruction and drill to make 
proficients in the sciences which underlie the various branches of 
industry, so it should be the object of manual labor to make ex- 
perts in all the vaious applications thereof to the operations of the 
garden, farm and work-shop. To the accomplishment of this desire- 
able object certain conditions are essential. The garden and the 
farm must be^brought to a state of high excellence. In the manner 
in which they are laid out, in the implements used, in the processes 
of cultivation, in their order and neatness, and, above all, in their 
products, they should be models, striking examples of the results 
which artistic skill can reach when rightly applied to these depart- 
ments of industry. They should be made to exhibit all the modern 
improvements, which are genuinely such. They should be made 
to illustrate all the new varieties of fruits, grasses and esculent 
roots that are really valuable, and with all this, they should reveal 
to every intelligent observer the fact that when beauty and profit 
are wisely combined, they ultimately produce the highest profits 
reckoned in actual cash. Then, further, the farm and garden 
ought to be so managed as to contribute something to the progress 
of agricultural and horticultural science and art. This important 
purpose must be effected by carefully conducted experiments which 
shall put all products and processes of questionable value to the se- 
verest test. Valuable varieties of domestic animals, of grains, 
grasses, woods, and ornamental trees, of vegetables and fruits, both 
large and small, should be introduced and submitted to trial, in 
order to determine whether they will flourish on Iowa soil. 

Striving constantly for superior excellence in management, 
method, and result, we shall be able as the years pass to settle 
many important questions, to extend the helping hand to the 
farmers and gardners of the State, and to exhibit annually cred- 
itable examples of our products at the State Fair. 

But the most important advantage to be derived from such a 



No. 16.] 



AGKICL'LTURAL COLLEGE. 



27 



farm and garden as we contemplate, is that they would afford the 
means of illustrating to our pupils,the best processes and the highest 
results, and enable them to apply to manual labor the sciences they 
study, to practice in the corresponding industrial arts. 

SYSTEMATIC ARRANGEMENT OF LABOR NECESSARY. 

Another condition of success in making experts in the nicer 
manual operations of the garden, farm and workshop, is that the 
different kinds of labor in each should be so divided and arranged 
that students may gradually progress from the simple to the more 
difficult, having practice in each, long enough to become adepts 
therein. In other words, a course of progressive labor should be laid 
out in each department corresponding as nearly as may be to the 
course of study and conducted with the same care and precision that 
are applied in the recitation room. The coming year will witness 
great improvements in this regard, for I am convinced that it is 
the only true way of securing the greatest possible benefit, from 
manual labor as an educating force. 

PROFESSOR'S DUTIES IN REGARD TO MANUAL LABOR. 

It is the manifest duty of every professor and teacher in the college 
to supervise and instruct students in the field, especially when his 
own classes are engaged on jobs in which are applied the theories he 
is employed to teach. It is quite as important, for example, that 
the Professor of Botany and Horticulture should teach the practice 
of Horticulture, as the classifications in Botany, and it is indispensable 
that the Professor of Practical Agriculture should give daily out-door 
instruction in the various operations of the field. 

MORE BUILDINGS NEEDED. 

It is of the utmost consequence that the college should be sup- 
plied with further conveniences Jn the way of buildings. Even 
the coming year the growth of the institution will be sadly checked 
for want of accommodations for its students. During the past year 
every available room has been filled by members, either of the 
freshman or preparatory class. All the members of these two classes, 



28 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



with a single exception, applied at the close of last term for permis- *^ 
Bion to return next spring. Beyond these more than one hundred 
and fifty applications, (fifteen from other states,) have been received,, 
for admission of new pupils at the next opening. How many more 
will apply before next March, I cannot conjecture, but I have no 
doubt that with ample room the college would open its second) 
year with between three and four hundred students. As matters 
now stand, some of the students of last year, who came from a few 
counties that sent more than their quota, will be compelled to 
yield their places to applicants from counties not yet represented 
in the college. These students, most of whom are promising 
scholars, entered in good faith, with an intention of graduating; and 
their case is one of peculiar hardship. It seems indeed almost an 
act of cruelty to drive earnest young men and women from the 
doors of an institution from which they have gained their noblest 
inspirations, and for which they cherish an afi*ection amounting to 
enthusiasm. I heartily deplore this hard necessity. It may change 
the current of many lives, otherwise full of promise, and I earnestly 
hope that the legislature will provide against the recurrence in 
the future of a similar misfortune, by making such appropriations 
for additional buildings as will enable us hereafter to welcome to our 
halls every son and daughter of the State who desires an industrial 
education. 

Our annual income, derived from the leasing of lands granted 
by Congress, now amounts to nearly $35,000. It is large enough 
to provide a liberal equipment in way of library, museum, and 
apparatus, and to gather a full corps of accomplished professors. 
With these abundant facilities, we can teach five hundred students 
almost as easily as one hundred and sixty. With means of 
instruction, illustration and practice which are unusually ample, 
with the number of students who are clamoring for admission, 
from all parts of the State constantly increasing, it will indeed be un- 
fortunate if dormitories alone should be wanting. Next year the 
present building will be filled by its freshman and sophomore classes. 
The year after, if no more buildings are added, we shall present the 
unheard of example of a college refusing to receive its annual fresh- 
man class for the want of a roof to shelter them, and compelled to 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



29 



await the graduation of its older pupils before it can admit its young- 
er ones. 

Even at the commencement of the coming year we shall be driven 
to the expulsion of twenty or thirty exemplary young men and 
women, in order to make way for others who are legally entitled to 
their places. Under such circumstances, is it not evident that, unless 
the legislature hastens to correct the calamity which threatens us, 
the growth of this beneficent enterprise will be checked, its youthful 
energies cramped, and its capacity for extensive good dwarfed. 

But the absence of sufficient dormitories is not our only urgent 
necessity in this direction. Our crowded condition has made it nec- 
essary to use all the public rooms for class recitations and lectures. 
There is, therefore, an entire lack of rooms suitable for a library and 
museum. The apartments designated for these purposes were una- 
voidably occupied by classes, and they are, at any rate, too small. The 
pressing need for a library must be met, for the present, by putting up 
temporary shelves in the room intended for this purpose, and using 
it for recitations as little as possible. Another still more serious 
difficulty of the kind must be encountered when the second year 
opens. The Sophomore class, eighty in number, will commence the 
study of chemistry next spring, and continue (general and analytical) 
through the year. There is an appropriation of |2,000, made by the 
Trustees at their annual meeting, for chemical apparatus, but no room 
in the building for a laboratory. Indeed, there is no proper place 
for a laboratory in a building in which students eat and sleep. The 
only relief from this dilemma that I can discover is to fit up a rough 
structure which stands near Prof. Jones' house, and is now used as a 
carpenter shop, and to occupy it temporarily for a laboratory until a 
small brick building, convenient for the purpose, can be put up. 
Such a building, sufficient for the present needs of the College, and 
capable of enlargement at a later day, might cost $5,000. 

THE KIND OF BUILDINGS NEEDED FOR THE AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE. 

The plans for further buildings which will best supply the neces- 
sities specified above, have received our most careful consideration, 



30 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



and it is my belief that nothing better can be adopted than the 
following : 

1st. To complete the present building by extending the wings 
according to the original purpose. 

2d. To build another dormitory for young men and leave the 
present one to be occupied by ladies only. 

The extension of the south wing would furnish : 

1st. A basement 35 x 50 feet for a laundry adequate to the wants 
of the College. 

2d. The first two floors above the basement, 35 x 50 feet, for the 
library, the upper one to be used as a s^allery. 

3d. The next two floors above (third story and attic) of the same 
dimensions, for a museum, the attic to be used as a gallery. 

These public rooms would be accessible, spacious, and every 
way adequate. 

The extension of the north wing fifty feet would enable us : 

1st. To enlarge the dining room in the basement to such dimen- 
sions that it would seat three hundred and fifty pupils. 

2d. To extend the present chapel so that it would be large 
enough to seat an audience of six hundred persons. 

3d. To get three ample recitation or lecture rooms in each of 
the two stories immediately above the enlarged chapel. 

4:th. To construct a room for practice in drawing, thirty-five 
feet square, in the attic. 

All these public rooms would be accessible from the inside 
through the halls in the corresponding stories, and from the out- 
side from a hall and staircase in the west end of the extended 
wing. I am of the opinion that the kitchen should be in a small, 
separate building. 

The extension of these wings as contemplated in the original 
draft will give symmetry and completeness to the entire building 
and furnish just the public rooms we need, neither more nor less. 

DORMITORY BUILDINGS NEEDED. 

The building proposed for dormitories and study rooms to be oc- 
cupied solely by young men, should be located some ten rods to 
the north-west of the present edifice and front the same way. 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURIAL COLLEGE. 



31 



The first building is one of great beauty, and the second one to be 
added should be made to harmonize with it in style and outline, but 
might be far plainer and less expensive. The basement might be 
used mainly for the heating apparatus and consequently could be 
made comparatively low. Then, inasmuch as the ceilings for rooms 
used for study and sleep are less elevated than larger rooms for 
public uses, four stories could be raised above the basement (besides 
the attic, without exceeding the height of the present structure. 

This number of stories would require less extent on the ground. 
In the plan proposed as in the first building, there would be a cen- 
tral building with two wings, limited to 124 x 42 feet and the wings 
to 41 X 42 feet. The main building should be divided from base- 
ment to roof by tivo cross walls, into three sections, each section 
would theji be 40 x 40 feet, exclusive of walls. A cross hall should 
traverse the center of each section from the floor of the first story 
to the attic, running from front to rear and accessible by a front 
door. On each side of this hall, in every story, there would be two 
rooms of good size, 15 x 15 feet, besides an alcove for a bed and 
a closet. In each section there would be twenty such rooms 
ample for at least forty students. 

Each of the two wings 40 x 40 feet, interior measurement, with 
the same division, would make a section, giving five sections in 
the entire building, capable in the aggregate of accommodating two 
hundred students. Space forbids anything more than an outline of 
the plan presented. I will simply add that I can conceive of none 
more simple, durable, less expensive, more favorable to quiet 
study or more convenient for heating and the introduction of the 
modern improvements. I hope it will be studied by the tru8tee«j 
with careful scrutiny. 

We estimate the cost of the two wings at |50,000 ; of the dormi- 
tory building at |85,000. 

MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 

Dr. Foote's excellent collection of minerals, secured for the Col- 
lege while he is professor therein, and the Shaflfer Zoological collec- 
tion, comprise the entire acquisitions for a museum. The Shaffer 
collection, from the pressure of other matters, has not as yet been 



32 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



classified, and though it contains many valuable specimens, is not, of 
course, complete. I would suggest that provision be made for 
classifying and increasing it the next year. 

At their annual meeting, a year ago, the Board appropriated 
|2,000 for the purchase of chemical and philosophical apparatus, and 
$2,500 for the purchase of books for the nucleus of a library, all to 
be invested nnder the direction of the President. Both these appro- 
priations are yet to be expended. While the want of books, espec- 
ially books of reference, was severely felt, it was found that the 
many weighty duties of the first year would not admit of the 
President's absence during term time without serious detriment to 
the College. He therefore proposes to devote a part of the present 
vacation to making the purchases referred to. Since chemistry is 
among the studies of the second year, no great loss has been sustained 
from the delay in the collection of apparatus for its equipment. It 
is now, however, imperative that a laboratory should be fitted up for 
the Sophomore class. Next to the men that teach its students, and to 
the men that control its affairs, the library, the laboratory, and the 
museum are the most important means of building up a great insti- 
tution of learning. 

OFFICE OF CASHIER AND BOOK-KEEPER. 

Under the appointment of the Board, Prof. Jones has managed the 
business of this office since the opening of the College, keeping such 
a system of accounts as to show the cost and pecuniary results of 
every department, and paying bills on the orders of the President? 
which are his vouchers. He has also received the deposits of the 
building committee, kept their accounts, and made disbursements 
according to their instructions. The business of the office is a heavy 
addition to his regular duties as Professor of Mathematics, involving 
the necessity of employing students as clerks. If further buildings 
are put up his duties will be largely increased. 

For a detailed exhibit of the expenses during the past year and 
the fractional term of the previous year, I refer you to the accompa- 
nying report of the cashier. It will be found from this report that 
the expenses of the college proper, which are legally chargeable to 
the interest fund, have been less than ^15,000 a year. This fund has 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



33 



from necessity been largely drawn upon for other purposes, but this 
can only be considered as a loan, and provision should be made for 
its immediate return. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS, HEATING, LIGHTING, ETC. 

Something further should be said in explanation of the heavy 
expenditure for various permanent improvements since the college 
opened, October 20, 1868. At that time the builder had completed 
his contract, and yet the building was destitute of all those conveni- 
encies which would put it in a fit condition for the reception of 
students. With a singular lack of foresight the architect had com- 
pleted the structure without making any provision for lighting, heat- 
ing, supplying with water, or for adequate drainage. These 
indispensable requisites for health and convenience had to be put in 
subsequently, at great disadvantage, and at an increased expense. 
The heating apparatus of Pennel & Co., introduced in the fall of 1868, 
failed to warm the building, and during the fractional term that 
followed, caused great discomfort and danger to health. As this 
could not possibly be remedied while the College was in session, 
the Trustees, at their meeting, March 18th, 1869, decided that the 
college year should close October 28th, in order to give Pennell & Co., 
(who are under bonds to heat the building to a uniform temperature 
of 65° in the coldest weather), both time and apportunity to make 
good their contract. I have no doubt, from the character of the 
preparations now making, that they will succeed. 

The plan for forcing water from a well, over seventy-five rods dis- 
tant, through all the stories of the building, by means of a pump driven 
by a wind-mill, is a complete success. 

The apparatus for manufacturing gas from gasoline, and supplying 
it to burners in every room, has furnished sufiicient light except in 
cold weather, which exception shows that a small brick building 
should be erected over the gasometer. With such a protection from 
atmospheric changes, it will doubtless supply excellent light for the 
college throughout the year. 

I have already described the sewer for drainage, begun and so 

nearly finished last year as to be ready for use when the building is 

again opened. 
5 



84 



AaRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



PROFESSOR'S HOUSES. 

Two professor's houses have been erected on the ornamental 
grounds the past year. One of them is completed and now occupied 
by my own family. It is a thoroughly built, well finished and taste- 
ful dwelling, and reflects credit on the foreman, N. P. Starks, who 
was employed by the building committee, and had its construction in 
charge. The other dwelling, intended for Professor Jones, is also 
under the supervision of Mr. Starks, and is well on towards comple- 
tion. This dwelling also will combine, in a high degree, the qualities 
of convenience and beauty. 

The expense for all these permanent improvements, except the 
sewer, will appear in the report of the building committee. 

These indispensable improvements, except professor's houses, 
should all have been made during the construction of the college 
building. They are properly chargeable to the cost of that building, 
and, though paid for in the past year, they are in no way con- 
nected with the current expenses of the institution. Whatever 
sums their completion has drawn from the interest fund must be 
returned by legislative appropriation. 

The entire disbursements of the two past years, as shown by the 
books of the college and the minutes of the Secretary, are as 
follows : 

[see cashier's statement.] 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

In adopting the plan of organization reported 'Nov. 20, 1868, the 
Board decided that the regular college year should commence early 
in March, and close late in November, making the vacation in the 
winter. The advantages of this arrangement are manifest from the 
following facts : 

Ist. The State law requires that every student of the college 
shall engage in manual labor two or three hours a day. I need 
hardly say to the gentlemen that compose this honorable body that 
it would be impossible in winter to furnish labor enough, without 
great pecuniary sacrifice, to enable one hundred and fifty students 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTXJRAL COLLEGE. 



85 



to comply with the requirements of the law. Clearly this valuable 
adjunct to our plan of organization must either be so modified as 
to render it insignificant, or wholly dispensed with, if the college 
year were to run through the months of winter instead of those of 
summer. We have opened and closed one most prosperous year 
with manual labor and a summer session. Indeed the number of 
students attending during the summer session was greater than at 
any other purely industrial college in this country. Shall we 
change policy in the tide of its unprecedented success? Neither 
reason nor result would sustain so unwarrantable a measure. 

2nd. A winter session with a summer vacation would go far 
to change the essential character and central idea of the enterprise. 
It would no longer, in any complete sense, be an industrial college. 
The college would be left, but the industrial element wanting. 
The peculiar characteristic of an industrial school is that it teaches 
the appiiGation of science to the useful arts^ hy actual example and 
manual practice. Take away example and practice, and there are 
a multitude of processes which could be taught as successfully as 
skating without ice, or swimming without water. How compara- 
tively valueless, for example, would be instruction in the theory of 
grafting, transplanting, budding, grouping, laying out of grounds, 
and the like, without illustration and actual trial in the garden and 
the field. Otherwise, in fact, the garden would have no purpose, 
the farm no meaning, except to add, as a specimen, another good 
farm to the thousands of good farms in the State, and the college 
would become an ordinary school, working on the old basis. The 
world has already proved, at the cost of millions, the futility of mere- 
ly theoretical knowledge in the industrial arts. It is true that those 
who are already experts can derive benefit from lectures simply on 
improved methods which they do not know, but it happens how- 
ever that the great bulk of those who resort to industrial colleges 
are not experts, but desire to be made such ; a result that can be 
reached only through study and manual practice combined. It is 
for the benefit of experts who have practice enough at home, that 
the Trustees determined a year ago to establish, as soon as it could 
be done, a course of winter lectures by distinguished men, on subjects 
of great interest to farmers, gardeners, stock-keepers, fruit-raisers, 



36 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



&c. Some of these lecturers have already been appointed, 
and their names published. I would advise that the first session 
for this course be opened on the first Wednesday of December 
next, and continued through the month. 

3d. I will only add that there are no indications of any general 
desire on the part of the farmers of Iowa, that the regular college 
year should be extended through the winter rather than the summer, 
as now successfully begun. Indeed, the fact that the college build- 
ing has been crowded to excess throughout the harvest months, and 
that many were at the same time refused admission for want of room, 
is tolerable evidence to the contrary. In an extensive correspon- 
dence with all parts of the State, only seven appUicants have 
expressed to me a wish to attend a winter term. Moreover, nearly all 
our advanced pupils being dependent — I am not sorry to say it — 
large upon themselves for support, gladly embrace the opportunity 
which a winter vacation affords to teach in the winter schools, and in 
this way to earn the means of defraying in part, the expenses of the 
coming year. More than a hundred are so employed at this time, 
and I regard them as valuable additions to the educating forces of 
the State. Most of them I fear, especially the young ladies, would 
not be able to attend the summer term without the winter's teaching, 
and these, and such as these, are here and elsewhere, by reason of a 
loftier purpose and a sturdier strength, the noblest material that 
ever enters the portals of a college. For these reasons I am con- 
vinced that the present arrangement of terms and vacations will 
confer the greatest good on the greatest number. 

In the above argument I have, of course, taken it for granted, 
that no man intelligent in educational matters can be found who 
believes that the students of Iowa, unlike all others, are able to 
study successfully through the entire twelve months. It is well 
known that the vast majority of students can accomplish as much 
in way of study in from thirty-six to forty weeks as in the whole 
year, and that the protracted strain of the intellect required in a 
course of advanced studies demands periodical relief. Hence the 
necessity of vacations. As regards the professors, it will be found 
in the very nature of this particular enterprise that their vacations 
must be much shorter than the regular ones. The next college 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEaE. 



37 



year as settled by the executive committee will, unless otherwise 
ordered by the Board, commence the 9th of March, 1870, and close 
on the 24th of November following, continuing thirty-e'ght weeks. 

EXPENSES OF STUDENTS. 

Expenses of students are reduced to the lowest figures possible. 
Board is furnished and washing done at actual cost. Students 
make a small deposit at the beginning of each month and settle all 
accounts at the end of each term. Room rent and tuition are free. 
Books are sold at the college at wholesale rates. For the past 
year board has been furnished at $2.75 per week ; washing at 50 
cents per dozen. Expenses which students incur at home ought 
to be defrayed by them in college. 

CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 

By decision of the Trustees, each representative district may send 
one student for every representative elected in such district to the 
popular branch of the Legislature. Applications for a certificate 
of admission to the college must be made to the Superintendent of 
Schools in the county in which the representative resides. The 
County Superintendent will examine each candidate and decide by 
lot which shall be the successful one. 



A. S. WELCH, President, 



38 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16 



FAEM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



ABSTRACT FROM REPORT FOR 1868. 
WORK DONE. 

Cleared part of Squaw creek of driftwood. Would have cleared 
all but for high water. 

Rebuilt fence on east side of farm, from south-east corner to rail- 
road, on the line. Cost $61.25. 

Rearranged stables in basement of barn, thereby greatly increasing 
their comfort, convenience and capacity ; put improved iron fasten- 
ing, in lieu of stanchions. Cost, less team and farm hands' labor, 
?146.5T. 

Put up flood gates, hung on forked posts, across Squaw creek bot- 
tom, on south side of farm, also in line with railroad fence, on north 
side of pasture. Cost, less farm labor. $25.00. 

Broke thirty-four and one-half acres prairie on second bottom, north 
of railroad. Cost, $121. 

Put up three sheds with yards attached for sheep and young cattle. 
Cost $100. 

Built three bridges over sloughs on south side of farm. Costs less 
farm labor, $20.00 

Bought, and laid in part, of drain tile, 9867 pieces, 2 inch ; 2500 
pieces, four inch ; 500 pieces, five inch, and 34 pieces of branch tile. 
Cost with freight, $669.15. 

Laid eighty-two rods of main drain, with numerous branch drains. 
Cost, $98.20. 

Bought of railroad company, 13179J feet superior pine fencing 
lumber. Cost, $329.48. 

Sowed grounds east and south from farm house, also high grounds 



No. 16. 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



in timber and bare spots in pastures with timothy, clover and blue- 
grass, mixed. Cost, ^37.45. Grasshoppers destroyed it all. 

Ploughed and carefully smoothed ten and one-half acres west of 
College building. Sowed same with oats, timothy and clover. Cost 
$74.55. Grasshoppers destroyed it all. 

Hauled coal, furniture, building material etc., for college, in all, 
sixty days, man and team. 



CROPS. 

Field J.—l^ 2.(iVQQ. O&Xq. Cost $73.50 

(All destroyed by grasshoppers.) 

Field C.—2% d^QVQ^. Oats. Cost 163.05 

Product, 293 bushels at 35 cts $102.55 

Yalue of straw : 20.00 

Total return 122.55 

Loss 40.50 

[Injured by grasshoppers.] 

Field F, 10^ acres. Wheat. Cost 84.40 

Product, 64 bushels at 75 cts 48.00 

Yalue of straw 5.00 

Total return 53.00 

Loss... 31.40 

(Injured by grasshoppers.) 

Field D.—lij 2iQYQQ. Wheat. Cost 110.60 

Product, 101 J bushels at 75 cts 76.12 

Yalue of straw 7.50 

Total return 83.62 

Loss 26.98 

(Injured by grasshoppers.) 

i^^■<sZ^? ^.—1 Of acres. Corn. Cost 83.75 

Product ,315 bushels at 35 cts 110.75 



40 AGRICULl-URAL COLLEGE. LNo. 16 

Yalue of fodder 10.50 

Total return 120.75 

Profit 37.00 

Field I. -f^i acres. Corn. Cost 110.38 

Product, 90 bushels at 35 cts 171.50 

Yalue of fodder 10.93 

Total return 182.43 

Profit 72.05 

Meld A. -IS Sieves. Corn. Cost 131.75 

Product, 450 bushels at 35 cts 157.50 

Yalue of fodder 13.50 

Total return 170.00 

Profit 38.25 

Field B.—li acres. Potatoes, Cost 30.00 

Product, 125 bushels at 50 cts 62.50 

Profit 32.50 

Part of field i was highly manured and sown to 
carrots; grasshoppers ate them. Planted 
same to beans ; grasshoppers ate them. 

Planted same to turnips, cost $45.10 

Product, 300 bushels at 20 cts 60.00 

Profit 14.90. 

Two acres in garden and orchard were sown with 

mangel wurzels; grasshoppers ate them. Ke- 

plowed and sowed same with turnips. Cost. . $34,00 

Product, 250 bushels at 20cts 50.00 

Profit 16,00 

Garden vegetables grew and promised well. Grasshoppers ate 
them for breakfast. 

Timothy hay— 24^ tons. Cost $ 66.37 



No. 16.1 AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE. 4| 

Product, 30 3-5 tons at $8,00. ' 244.80 

Profit 178.43 

Prairie hay— 80 tons. Cost $ 60.00 

All farm productions were greatly reduced by the ravages of the 
grasshoppers. 

FARM TEAMS. 



Bought team of large bay horses, wagon and harness. Cost..$ 575.00 



Sold old bay horse " Bill" for 70.00 

Bought pair of large mules. Cost 550.00 

Sold old white horse " Charlie " for 100.00 

LAND SALES. 

Have sold various lots of land in Story and Boone counties 

to different parties for cash and approved notes, amount- 
ing, with interest paid, to $2179.85 

Notes outstanding, not due, well secured 983.00 



FARM IMPLEMENTS AND WAGONS. 

Have purchased various necessary farm implements, among other 
things, a corn planter, farm wagon, two-horse cultivator, Hawkeye 
cultivator, reaper (Johnston's), mower (Buckeye), light spring wagon, 
Dickey sifter, straw cutter, root cutter, diamond harrow, together 
with many minor implements, as needed. Whole cost, $1033.98. 

REPORT FOR 1869. 
To THE BOAKD OF TRUSTEES I 

Gentlemen : As by law required, I hereby present to you my* 
annual report of the condition of the farm and operations thereon 
during the year just closed. 

Little in the shape of farm improvements was effected during 
the first three months. A temporary ice house was erected for 
the college and 2,500 cubic feet of ice securely stored in it ; the ice 
was mostly cut by persons employed about the college ; the hauling 
6 



42 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



of ice, lumber, sawdust, rails for floor, etc., was done by farm hands 
and teams ; rails, sleepers, etc., for the floor were taken from the 
woods on the farm ; lumber, nails, cutting of ice, etc., were paid 
for by cashier of college and appear in his books; sawdust was 
hauled from a sawmill south of Ames and cost nothing but hauling 
and getting out where it was frozen. The remainder of the time 
until near the last of March was filled up by hauling coal and wood 
to the college, wood, and forage for the stock, etc., etc. Com- 
menced the 29th of March to prepare ground for seed but was 
prevented by snow storm from sowing until fifth of April, when 
sowing wheat was begun and farm field work was prosecuted as 
vigorously as the unfavorable weather and other circumstances 
would admit. Finished sowing wheat by noon of the tenth of 
April. Extent of wheat sown, 33^ acres. 

One hundred and sixty-four rods of post and board fence was 
put up (chiefly by students) north of the railroad. The posts were 
made by students from logs found in the creek timber, covered 
with moss and supposed to be rotten, but which, on examination, 
were found to be very sound heart wood and made excellent posts. 
This fence encloses all the high land lying north of the railroad fit 
for cultivation. Cost of lumber, §162.36 ; students' labor, $40.20 ; 
teams, $14.00. Total, $216.56. 

The land, sixteen acres, lying due south of the college, from the 
east line of the old orchard has been all broken, by farm 
teams at spare time between the plowings of corn, to the 
slough running down from the well spring that supplies the college 
with water, up as far as the south line of the farm, except about 
two acres around the house immediately south of the college. 
It is also fenced, the sonth side with a substantial post and board 
ience, the west with a fence moved there temporarily, until the 
public road can be constructed around by the south-west corner 
of the farm, when all should be fenced and improved. 

Permanent fence 80 rods, temporary fence 50 rods, cost of lum- 
ber $103, teams $10.56, student s labor31.09 ; total $144.59 

It was found impracticable to fence the land in the creek bottom 
north of the railroad, owing to the continued high stage of water in 
the creek, keeping the lower portions of land overflowed. I would 



Ko. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



4a 



recommend that, when this land is fenced, it be done with wire, 
as I have found that a wire fence, made with the same amount of 
timber in posts, will stand better and last longer when exposed to 
occasional floods, than either posts or rails. It offers less resistance 
to the current of water, and if five strands of wire are put on posts 
seven feet apart, no stock that is allowed to run at large in Story 
county can get through it. The cost will be rather less than for posts 
and boards. 

As soon as the season permitted an effort was made to complete 
the tile drains begun last fall. About 120 rods, in addition to that 
made last fall, were cut, tile laid, and the drains completed in a very 
satisfactory manner. It has done good service. rods more 

were cut and got ready for the tile, when, owing to the excessive 
rains, the ground became like a sponge, and the sides caved in. Ef- 
forts to clear the drains long enough to get the tile laid, proved un- 
availing, and w^e were forced to abandon it for the time being. Could 
have finished it in the fall, but funds failed — appropriation exhausted. 

A young orchard of 300 apple trees was planted on a piece of 
land, selected by Dr. Townshend, near the w^est end of the farm. It 
is sheltered by the natural timber on the west and north, and is I 
think, the most suitable site or location for a successful orchard, on 
the farm. Cost of plants, $37.54, planting, tending, etc., 57.07, to- 
tal, 94.61. 

Of the evergreens that had beeen under cultivation on the farm, a 
considerable number were very successfully transplanted, under the 
direction of the President, by students, into ornamental groups on 
different parts of the college grounds, and already make a very mark 
ed improvement in the appearance of the landscape. 

In the nursery grounds there are yet several thousand trees of 
different sizes and varities, both evergreens and deciduous, many of 
which will be of good size for transplanting to permanent sites du- 
ring the coming season, while a large number would be benefitted by 
cultivation in the nursery for one or more years. 

Twenty-five hundred honey locust plants (three thorned acacia) 
were procured and planted in the spring, with a view to test its 
adaptability as a hedge plant for this latitude. They were planted in 



44 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

various kinds of soil, and in situations exposed and sheltered. So 
far the plants have grown well and are a good stand for a hedge. 
Length of hedge row (in aggregate) 116 rods. 

Cost of plants at nursery $ 12.50 

Freight, planting, and cultivating 11.25 

Total cost 23.75 



It is impossible to give an exact statement of the amount of grain 
raised on the farm during the past season. The crop was a very 
superior one, but, owing to the incessant rains, so much handling was 
found necessary to get it dried and kept from sprouting, that a great 
deal was shattered out and left on the ground. The work of hand- 
ling, binding, etc., was principally performed by students, and as they 
were in many different places on the same day and all reported to 
the President simply as *' harvesting," without designating in what 
particular field the work was performed, an accurate Dr. and Cr, 
account with each field cannot now be made out. The general result, 
however, is as follows : 



WHEAT, Dr. 

To breaking 33^ acres at $3.50 per acre $117.25 

To 60 bushels seed wheat at $1.15 per bushel 69.00 

To 13J days man and team in spring, putting in crop 35.00 — $221.25 

Cr. 

By 723 bushels wheat at 50cts per bushel $361.50 

By straw 33.50— 395.00 



To be set against expense of harvesting and stacking..$ 173.75 
The wheat is much above average quality this season. 

OATS, Dr. 

To 8 days plowing, 5 days sowing, 15 J days harrow- 
ing— 28^ days at $3.50 per day $ 98.87 

To 95 bushels seed oats at 65cts 61.75— 160.62 



No. 16.1 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 45 

Cr. 

Bj 976 bushels oats at 45cts per bushel $439.20 

Bj straw 10.00— 449.20 

To be set against expense of harvestingi 288.58 

The labor on small grain amounted to — 

Forty four days man and team $154.00 

Add for student's labor 152.92— 306.92 



Leaving a profit on the whole of 1155.41 



To 55J days work with man and team plowing, har- 
rowing, planting, cultivating, etc., at 3.50 per day.|194.25 

To seed 6.00 

To cutting and shocking by students 41.09 

To estimated cost of husking 105.00— 346.34 

Cr. 

By 1396 bushels of corn, at 45 cents per bushel. ..$628.20 

By corn fodder 100.00 -T28.20 



Profit ? 381.86 

There were several flat spots of land which, from the incessant rains, 
were under water so much that the seed perished ; estimated extent, 
four acres. 

The corn was cut and shocked by students, just previous to the 
first frost, and the fodder is of excellent quality. 

POTATOES 

Between six and seven acres of potatoes were planted. There are 
now about 600 bushels on hand. About 430 bushels have been used 
in college and farm house. 

Dr. 

To planting and cultivating, 17 days man and team, $ 59.50 



40 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. LNo. 16, 

To students' labor 13.17 

To Seed 20.00—$ 92.6T 

Cr. 

Bj 1030 bushels potatoes at 40 cts per bushel $ 412.00 

Profit 319.33 



It is supposed that enough potatoes are on hand to supply the 
College until the new crop comes in, also furnish seed, etc. 

HAY. 

Of timothy, 46J tons were saved in very good order — 



value $ 558.00 

Cost, students' labor, $18.88 ; other labor, 52.52 71.40 

Profit 486.60 

Of natural grass hay 40 tons, rather coarse and weedy — 

value I 160.00 

Cost, students' labor, $18.36; other labor, 56.81 75.17 

Profit 84.83 



All the natural grass in the creek bottoms was so sanded and 
damaged by the frequent floodings that it was unfit for food for stock, 
and a contract was made for fifty tons of upland prairie hay, at |2.75 
per ton in the stack. A sharp frost occurred before it was all cured 
and only twenty-nine tons have been secured on the contract. Cost, 
$79.75 ; hauling to be added, $36.25 ; total cost, $116.00. Another 
stack containing thirty tons has been secured from an adjoining farm 
at the same rates. Cost, $82.50 ; hauling, $37.50 ; total, $120.00. 

About two acres of vegetables were raised in the farm garden, 
an excellent crop. Cost, $50.00; value, $150.00; profit, $100.00. 

The young cherry trees nearly all bore fruit, several of the early 
trees very full. A little over a bushel of fruit was saved ; value 
unknown : consumed in college and farm house. 

Some few apples and grapes were also produced and chiefly con- 
sumed in farm house. 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



it 



On the 13th of April a quantity of wheat that had been received 
from the Department of Agriculture, called " Arnautka Wheat," 
was very carefully sown and harrowed in. By sowing a little 
thin, it made enough for one acre. It grew well, and until the ears 
were fully out gave promise of being an excellent crop, but to our 
excessive mortification, when it should have begun to mature, it 
commenced to rot, and rotted so rapidly that when it ought to have 
been ripe, it was, on a careful estimate, considered doubtful if it 
would yield enough to be seed for the same amount of land — the 
produce, a very flinty, inferior article. 

Of other seed from the same source, black Swedish oats proved 
a failure. Excelsior oats were a good crop but so injured by wet 
weather that a fair test of their merits was not obtained. 

Sommerset oats same as above, (believed to be same variety as 
Excelsior.) 

White Schonen sown at same time ; differs from the above and is 
later in ripening. 

Saxonian and Probstier barley were both carefully tried and 
promised well, but were so injured by wet as to be of little value 
except to save varieties. 

With the exception of the black Swedish oats, I think the other 
varieties, including the barley, should be further tested. 

The garden seeds from the Department of Agriculture were 
mostly under the care of Dr. Townshend, Professor of Practical 
Agriculture, who had charge of the College garden, and I am 
unable to make any report of their value. 

A few, consisting of three varieties of onions, three varieties of 
beets, four of carrots, three of cabbage, two of peas, two of beans, 
one of lettuce, three of radish, and three of corn, were sown in the 
garden at the farm house, and with the exception of the cabbage 
all did well, growing luxuriantly and being of excellent quality. 

About three acres of mangel-wurzel, two acres of Swede 
turnips, and several acres of white turnips, were sown as winter 
food for stock. Although the season was unpropitious, a very fair 
average crop was produced, but all were seriously injured by an 
unusualy severe early frost. The white turnips were an entire 
loss ; the mangel nearly so ; of the Swedes a considerable portion 
was saved, but mostly in a damaged condition. 



46 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



A small portion of the land set apart for College garden and not 
required for garden purposes, was planted with sorghum seed. 
The season was unfavorable and it did not mature well. The 
planting, hoeing, stripping, cutting, etc., was all done by students, 
and is charged along with garden work in cashier's report. 

Seed, team-labor, labor working up, and wood used in 

working up cost |53.75 

Cb. 

By 92 gallons sorghum syrup at 75 cents per gallon. . . $69.00 

About twelve acres of land were set apart for a garden for the 
College and taken charge of by Dr. Townshend. Some plowing 
and other work was done in it by farm teams and hands, an 
account of which will be found in books kept by the cashier and 
book-keeper in the College. Ml the work done for the College and 
Professors' houses, (including ice mentioned in the beginning of 



this report) is embraced in the following statement : 

In 1868 To days work by man and team for College or 

buildings, improvements, etc i . . . 604 

In 1869 To days work by man and team for College or 

buildings, improvements, etc . , , 258J 

318| days, man and team at $3.50 per day $1113.87i 

STOCK SOLD DURING THE YEAR. 

Jan. 21. Devon bnll Baker," to L. S. Coffin, for thirty 

mutton sheep (by Mr. Cusey) for $ 75.00 

21. Three high grade bucks to L, S. Coffin for nine 

mutton sheep (by Mr. Cusey) for 22.50 

Feb. 8. Durham bull calf " Spencer," to Hon. S. King 

for 150.00 

9. Yearling Devon bull to Mr. Hannan for 50.00 

11. Durham bull calf " Sherman," to Hon. J. D. 

Wright for 175.00 

Mar. 18. Old Durham Bull "Alexander," to Judge 

Hewitt for 150.00 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



49 



May 26. Young grade bull calf to Mr. George Kirk- 
ham for 30.00 

June 12. Young grade bull calf to Mr. A. J. Graves for 30.00 
14. (Seven days old) grade bull calf to Mr. Greely 

for ' 15.00 

Nov. 4. To P. Cadwell, Logan, one Durham bull calf 

" Iowa Duke/' for 150.00 

Dec. 29. To T, A. Graham, Toledo, one grade bull calf 

for 50.00 

30. Seven pigs sold at various times during the 

year 72.50 

30. Nine Turkeys 13.50 

30. Hides sold at various times 93.09 

Milk has been furnished to the college to the 
value of (the cost of milking partly paid 

by the college) 246.55 

Potatoes (partly dug by students) to the value 

of 109 00 

Beef, mutton, veal, pork, and cured meats to 
the value of (the cost of butchering mostly 

paid by cashier of college) 893.40 



The condition of the farm is much improved since last year. The 
additional amount of tile drain put in, enabled us to get a full crop 
of corn from land that had previously cost annually a large amount 
of labor, seed, etc., but had never yielded enough to pay for the 
seed, and was unsightly in every respect, and particularly so on a 
farm which should be a model of neatness and good management. 
It is with much regret that I call attention to the failure to complete 
the tile drains already begun. The appropriation made by the le- 
gislature would have been amply sufficient to have completed them; 
but for the causes heretofore stated, it was all expended without ac- 
complishing that object, and more money should be provided for 
that purpose. Provision should also be made to run some drains 
through the land set apart for a garden for the college, as portions 
of it are entirely too wet for garden purposes. I think |500 a year 
7 



50 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



for the next two years, could be very profitably expended in this 
manner, and no better investment could be made of the money, as 
other portions of the farm can be greatly improved by draining, and 
stand very much in need of it. A considerable quantity of tile is on 
hand for that purpose. 

It has been contemplated by the Board to have all the land en- 
closed, and got into improved pasturage, so that more stock can be 
kept. It is very desirable that this should be carried out, and it 
would be well to devise some means whereby three or four hundred 
acres of more land could be added to the farm for hay and pastu- 
rage. It will be impossible, with the farm as at present limited, to 
furnish the amount of labor the students are now required by law to 
perform, and not make that labor of a more expensive character than 
it ought to be. 

All of the bottom lands on Squaw creek, south of the railroad, 
were sown early in the season with a mixture of grass seeds, consist- 
ing of timothy, blue grass, and red and white clover ; but having 
been so often flooded, I fear that most of it has perished where 
flooded, and been so weakened from the extra rank growth of grass 
and weeds, where not, that a second sowing will be necessary. It will 
be well that this should be followed up, as these lands could not be 
converted into anything else but pasture, except at an expense 
greater in amount than what would be required to purchase land for 
hay and pasture, outside of the present limits of the farm ; and the 
land now used as hay-ground, or timothy meadow, could be put to 
other uses ; a portion of the labor for students could be furnished 
through this means. 

There is a piece of marsh land formed by the large spring N. E 
from the barn. From its suitable position for irrigation I am of opin- 
ion that with a little preparation it could be converted into a cran- 
berry bed. It is more like the natural habitat of the cranberry than 
any piece of land I know of in the country. It has never produced 
any useful thing as yet. The peat it contains will doubtless be of 
great value should fuel for the college or farm become scarce, and it 
would be valuable as a fertilizer for other portions of the farm when 
the natural fertility of the soil shall fall away, and manure cannot be 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



51 



made to keep it up. The cultivation of the cranberry would not 
interfere therewith, should it ever be wanted for either of the above 
purposes. I would therefore recommend that a small portion of it be 
prepared and the experiment of raising cranberrys fairly tried. All 
the preparation necessary is the paring off and removing of about 
two inches of the surface, covering about the same depth with sand, 
(which is close at hand), and planting the vines, hundreds of which 
may be had for the cost of gathering and transportation. 

I would further reccommend that a small annual appropriation be 
asked for to purchase seeds and plants for the experimental grounds, 
and for distribution throughout the State. These grounds should, to 
some extent, be used as a part of the educational force, and also to 
test the utility and practicability of introducing valuable trees and 
plants of other countries, and of other parts of our own country into 
our State. The College Farm is in the centre of the State, and 
should be its experimental garden. 

If it is still intended to carry out the plan of feeding and slaughter- 
ing the meats used in the College, I would suggest the propriety of 
abandoning wheat raising, except so far as may be necessary and 
advisable in the experimental grounds, and raise more corn, oats and 
roots. With the amount of stock now on the farm and necessary to 
be kept on it to supply the College with meats, we cannot raise wheat 
and sufficient feed for stock also ; but if wheat raising is abandoned, 
(except as above), and additional land acquired for grass and hay, I 
think that sufficient feed can be raised by the students' labor to supply 
the College with me.ats, and thus keep out of the market ; for if we 
have the land we can always raise it cheaper than we can buy it, 
whether we view it as corn, or beef and pork. 

Early in the spring, being unable to provide more renumerative la- 
bor for the students, and with a view to facilitate the introduction of 
grass for pasture into certain parts of the farm covered with timber, 
I had the students clear out the underbrush from about ten acres 
along the west end of the farm, and about six acres of that where 
thickest along the edge of the timber in Squaw creek bottom. It 
would improve the appearance of the farm very much to have all 
useless underbrush, rotten logs, etc., removed from these lands and 
the whole seeded down with blue grass and timothy. 



52 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



The act of Congress, making a grant of lands for the establish- 
ment of the College requires that an annual report, regarding the 
progress of the college should be made, see art. 4, sec. 5, page 126 
Report of Register of State Land office, for 1865." This has not 
yet been done, no provision having been made by the General Assem- 
bly to defray the cost thereof. 

In another part of this report I have called attention to the nec- 
essity for more land being added to the farm. I would most respect- 
fully suggest the propriety of asking Legislative sanction to the use 
of a portion of the funds arising from the sale of the lands granted 
by Congress as contemplated in art. 1, sec. 5, act of Congress above 
cited for this purpose. 

A good assortment of tools and implements are now on the farm. 

(See list and appraisement by Ex. Committee.) 

A walking corn cultivator, sent here as a donation by a plow man- 
facturing company in Moline, Illinois, has been used during the past 
season and found to be a very effective implement, of very light 
draught and easy management. 

Another donation received in September last was a plow from 
Skinner & Bro., Des Moines. It has some new and very commenda- 
ble improvements, among which is an arrangement by which the 
point of draught can be changed so that either two or three horses 
can be worked abreast without inconvenience. It is of easy draught 
and works well. 

In addition to the young Chester White sow donated by Mr. Court, 
Michigan, last fall, a very fine young sow was donated by Mr. 
Andrew Lovell, of Sycamore, Illinois, in the month of June last, and 
another by Hon. L. W. Stuart, Monmouth, Iowa, in the month of 
August last. 

Free copies of the Daily State Register^ Iowa Homestead^ Daven- 
port Gazette and Country Gentleman newspapers have been received 
during the year at this office. 

For financial statement see book-keeper's report. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

H. M. THOMSON, 
Superintendent and Secretary until October 1, 1869. 

P. S. BROWN, 
Superintendent and Secretary ^ pro tern. 



No. 16.] AGRICULTURIAL COLLEGE. 53 



REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE 

FOR 1868. 

COLLEGE BUILDING. 
To THE BOAED OF TRUSTEES. 

Gentlemen : Tour Committee met at the College Farm, April 
21st, 1868, for consultation on the proper course to be pursued in 
completing the work on the College Building ; present, Messrs. 
Dnnham, architect and superintendent, and Eeichard, contractor. 

Your Committee were of opinion that the law making appropri- 
ation of $10,000 to complete the Building and settle with Mr. 
Reichard, contemplated first the sure completion of the Building* 
With this view, they determined to direct the expenditure of the 
money and to see that all bills for material and labor performed 
should be paid under their supervision. They proposed to Mr. 
Keichard that he should proceed with the work, make his own con- 
tracts for labor and material, and your committee would pay all 
legitimate bills presented to them. Mr. Eeichard declined. Your 
committee then proceeded to complete the building, the work being 
done under charge of Mr. M. B. Moore, the superintendent's 
efiicient representative. The building has been well completed, so 
far as the contract with Mr. Eeichard required, at a cost of 
$8,900.86, properly chargable to the contractor. In addition, bills 
not properly chargable to him have been paid, amounting to 
$1,584.93. Total expenditure, $10,570.79. Amount of appropri- 
ations drawn, $13,000. 

PKOFESSOK'S HOUSES. 

At the meeting of your Board in May last, your committee were 
instructed to proceed with the erection of three houses for the use 
of professors. 



54 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



After careful examination of houses built of concrete blocks, upon 
the favorable opinion of the architect, there being no adverse opin- 
ion expressed by any member of your board, they reported in favor 
of building the house, of that material. The manufacture of the 
blocks being finiehed,work was commenced on the walls of the buildings 
as soon as deemed safe. About the latter part of September the 
walls of one house were completed, and the roofing partly on. While 
the masons were finishing a chimney in the center of the building, 
it gave way and took with it an inside wall on which the 
joists from the side, of the building rested ; the joists, falling, drew 
with them the outside walls of the whole structure. This unfortunate 
catastrophe is supposed to have been the result of using the concrete 
blocks before they had hardened sufficiently, and of the continuous 
wet weather that prevailed during that portion of the year. The 
whole night and morning preceding its fall had been very wet, proba- 
bly the immediate cause of the calamity. 

It was the desire of your committee to have all the houses enclos- 
ed early, with a view to their entire completion within the year. 
With this view they had instructed Mr. Moore to hurry them for- 
ward as fast as safe. This desire, no doubt, prompted him to use the 
blocks during the wet weather, before hard enough. 

Soon after the fall of the building your committee met, and ordered 
all work upon the houses stopped for the season, hoping that next 
spring the blocks would harden sufficiently to be safe. Of the other 
two houses, one has the joists of the second floor laid, and the other 
of the first floor. The walls have been banked to protect them from 
water and frost, and it is hoped they will prove satisfactory in the 
spring. Mr. Moore reports the wood work of the fallen building 
little injured. 

Your committee had purchased all the lumber thought necessary 
for the erection of the three houses, likewise window frames, glazed 
sash and doors. Total disbursements for the houses, $8,214.62 ; 
of the appropriation has been drawn |6000. 

HEATING APPARATUS AND COOKING RANGE. 

According to instructions of your board, your committee investiga- 
ted various processes of heating large buildings. Their preferences 



Ko. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



55 



were for heating by steam pipes. They invited parties engaged in 
the business at Chicago to examine the building and submit proposi- 
tions. The lowest bid received was $13,400, with the condition that 
changes should be made in the building estimated at $1500, making 
the entire estimated cost exceed the bounds of the appropriation 
therefor. Your committee were thereby precluded from attempting it 
bv that process, being sworn to refrain from letting any contract, 
or undertkaing to order any work, the estimated cost of which should 
exceed the amount appropriated for the purpose. 

Your committee then examined the Ruttan system of heating and 
ventilation and invited W. A. Pennel & Co., of Normal, III., to exam- 
ine the building and submit a proposition for warming and ventilating 
it under the Ruttan patent. After due examination by a member of 
their firm, they proposed to warm the building to at least sixty-five 
degrees, Farenheit, during the coldest weather, for $6,500, on con- 
dition that such changes be made in the building as were then point- 
ed out. These changes involved the enlargement of two flues the 
entire height of the building, and the construction of hot and cold air 
ducts, aud of ventilating flues, with other less important changes. 
Your committee were of opinion, from estimates made by Mr. Moore, 
that these changes could all be made within the amount of the ap- 
propriation, and therefore concluded a contract with Pennel & Co. 
for the completion of the work, taking bonds to the amount of the 
contract price from them, with security for its faithful performance. 
The work ordered by them has been completed according to 
their instruction, but we are sorry to say that the building has not yet 
been sufficiently warmed to meet the requirements of their contract. 
We understand their agent has been at the college and ordered more 
furnaces with a view to a full compliance therewith. 

The amount expended has over run the estimated cost. Total dis- 
bursments, including cooking range, $10,339.89. Appropriation 
drawn, $10,000. 

WATER, CLOCK AKD BELL. 

A bell has been procured and is now in the belfry ; cost in place, 
$184.11. 



56 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



It was deemed best by your committee to refrain from procuring a 
clock until a permanent supply of good water should be procured. 
After examining various projects, it was finally determined to dig a 
well at the head of a spriug about three hundred yards west of the 
College building, and, by the use of a windmill, force the water to a 
tank in the upper story of the building. Accordingly a mill was 
bought of Mr. Halliday of Batavia, 111. It has proved a success, 
furnishing an abundant supply for all purposes, besides providing a 
means of speedily extinquishing fire. The water is brought from 
the well in a two inch iron pipe, smaller ones being used for conveying it 
through the building. The whole amount paid out and charged to 
this fund up to date is, $1,354.98. This amount does not however, 
cover the entire expenditure, in as much as pipe and fixtures for the 
water works and for gas works were embraced in the same bill and 
no data is now at hand to make the proper division. The whole is 
included in the account for gas works ; appropriation drawn, |2,000. 

SAFE. 

A large safe has been purchased, and is now in the building, at a 
cost of $800 in Chicago, at a discount, as donation to the College, of 
$100 ; whole expenditure, $850. Appropriation of $1,200 not drawn. 

GAS WORKS. 

Your committee were instructed to examine gas generators, with a 
view to procuring gas to light the building. After much inquiry and 
personal examination of different machines used for the purpose, they 
finally concluded to accept a proposition made by J, M. Stryker, of 
Chicago, to furnish and put up an apparatus under the Rand patent. 
Your committee preferred this, among other reasons, on account of 
its location outside of the building. Mr. Stryker proposed to furnish 
and put up the apparatus for $800, and to have it completed in a short 
time. Your committee were informed by him that delay was caused by 
the death of the foreman who had the works in charge. It is now nearly 
finished, however. Your committee employed Mr. John S. Pearco, a 
gas fitter of Des Moines, to examine the building and give an esti- 
mate of the amount of pipe and all necessary fixtures to complete the 
gas fitting ; they also agreed to employ him by the day to perform 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



57 



the labor. The estimated cost of the whole gas fixtures and appara- 
tus, when we finally concluded to have it put in, was about f 3000> 
allowing, as was supposed, a liberal estimate. The actual cost, no 
doubt, will exceed that amount ; the precise sum, however, cannot 
be ascertained. 

Total disbursements charged to this account, $3011.58. 

OUT-BUILDINGS. 
Total disbursements, $634.46. Appropriation not drawn. 

INSIDE FITTINGS. 
Total disbursements, $793.42. 

CLEANING BUILDING. 
Total disbursements, $191.36. 

RECAPITULATION. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 



Amount expended for completion of College building 110570.79 

Amount expended for Professor's houses 8214.62 

Amount expended for heating apparatus and cooking range 10339.89 

Amount expended for bell 184.11 

Amount expended for water works 1354.98 

Amount expended for safe 850.00 

Amount expended for out-buildings 630.46 

Amount expended for gas works 3011.58 

Amount expended for inside fitting up 793.42 

Amount expended for cleaning 191.36 



Total 136141.21 

BECEIVED. 

State appropriation drawn. College Building $13000.00 

From sales of household goods 127.75 

State appropriation drawn, Professor's houses 6000.00 

State appro, drawn, heating apparatus & cooking range 10000.00 

8 



58 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16- 



State appropriation drawn, water, etc 2000.00 

Interest fund loaned, gas works, etc 5000.00 

Total 136127.75 

Your committee have effected a settlement with Mr. C. A. Dunham, 
the architect and superintendent. The amount which appeared to 
be due him after making the deduction on his percentage of $500 
according to contract, was $2500.88, which has been paid in full. 
Your committee have been furnished a bill of extra work and mate- 
rial allowed Mr. Reichard, according to contract, certified by the 
architect and superintendent, amounting to $3615.75, which we fully 
approve, and recommend that the same be placed to Mr. Richard's 
credit, thereby leaving a balance due the State from him of $5370.11. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JNO. RUSSELL, Chairman, 

REPORT FOR 1869. 

To THE Board of Trustees : 

Gentlemen : Since your last annual meeting no written report 
has been made relative to the various matters that have demanded 
the attention of your committee. With a view to present a continous 
record in a brief form, we will make a detailed statement of our 
action on the various important matters that have demanded our 
attention. 

The heating apparatus having been found inadequate to fully 
warm the whole building, Messrs. Pennel & Co., who put it in and 
guaranteed its success, were informed of its failure and urged to 
make such arrangements as would fulfill their guarantee. In 
February, 1869, after their agent, in connection with a member of 
their firm, had visited the building, a meeting of your committee 
was held at the college and a course of action agreed upon which, 
it was believed, would remedy the defects. 

The original contract bound the State to make such changes 
in the building as were required to adapt it to the reception of the 
apparatus. It was contended by Fennel & Co. that the State 
should, on its part, make additional changes after it was supposed 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



59 



the necessary alterations had been made and completed. As the 
terms of the contract seemed to leave the duty of the State in some 
doubt in relation to further changes, your committee concluded to 
raake such as were desired, provided the company on their part 
would give an additional bond for the payment of one thousand 
dollars — the amount of estimated cost — in case of their still failing. 
Your committee's action in the matter was submitted to jour 
honorable body, amply discussed at your meeting in March last, 
and fully approved. The changes authorized are now making and 
are hoped to prove adequate. 

In addition to the four extra furnaces they contemplated setting, 
Pennell & Co. proposed to furnish new, heavier and more durable 
ones in the place of those that have been used ; the college setting 
them and paying freight. It was deemed best to accept their propo- 
sition, and thereby secure new and better furnaces in the place of 
those that had been overheated, and in a considerable degree in- 
jured. It seemed to be the desire of the firm to make everything 
satisfactory and permanent. The cost of the changes now in pro- 
gress cannot yet be fully ascertained. 

SEWERAGE. 

The attention of your committee was early called by the President 
to the absolute necessity for adequate sewerage for the building, in 
order to secure the health of the students, no provision having been 
made therefor in the original plan. As a matter of necessity, 
your committee authorized the construction of the necessary sew- 
erage, and ordered it built of brick made for that purpose. A 
contract was accordingly made with Mr. J. J. McDougai to make 
the necessary amount, and the work was placed in charge of the Pre- 
sident. The season having proved extremely wet and unfavorable 
for the prosecution of such work, it was pursued under many difficul- 
ties, and at greatly enhanced expense. It is now nearly completed, 
and will prove all that could be desired for the purpose contem- 
plated. The cost will be found in the report of the cashier. There 
having been no appropriation made by the State for the purpose^ it 
was temporarily paid from the funds of the institution, trusting the 
General Assembly would make provision for refunding it when ad- 
vised of the necessity for its immediate construction. 



60 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE. 



LNo. u: 



PROFESSOR'S HOUSES. 

At a meeting of your committee held at the College in March, 
the building of Professor's houses was taken into consideration. 
After a full examination of the concrete blocks which had been 
manufactured the previous season, it was found that they had not 
hardened and were of too fragile a character to justify us in using 
them for the purpose designed. The failure in this material is 
something for which we are unable to account. While they were 
making they were examined by parties well acquainted with the 
material, whose experience in building entitled their opinions to 
great weight and consideration. Among others the Architect,, 
Mr. Dunham, pronounced them the best he had seen made in thei 
State, and in his opinion they were excellent for the purpose; 
For some cause they proved unfit and were not used. 

Y'our committee, in view of the disastrous and unfortunate i 
result of that experiment, determined to construct two houses of 
brick, and entered into a contract with Mr. McDougal to make and 
deliver on the farm not less than one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand good clay brick, at eight dollars per thousand, the first to 
be delivered by the 20th of June, and the balance as fast as needed 
for the prosecution of the work. Delay was caused in their 
delivery by the extremely unfavorable weather, but your com- 
mittee were satisfied that Mr. McDougal did the best he could to 
secure them in time, and were willing to overlook his deficiency in 
this respect, especially as the brick furnished were of excellent 
quality. Had the opportunity for obtaining brick been as good 
the previous year, the experiment of using concrete blocks would 
probably not have been made, and thus have saved the loss 
and vexation attending that misfortune. But it seemed impractica- 
ble at that time to obtain or to make good brick within accessable 
distance of the farm. 

After full consultation (having on hand the doors, windows, 
joists and other material designed for it), your committee determined 
to build the President's house on the same plan as the one that had 
fallen. But for this prepared material, your committee might have de- 
termined to change the plan to a somewhat less expensive building, in 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



61 



view of the loss consequent upon the misfortune of the previous year. 
Some little change was made in the original plan of the other build- 
ing which it was believed would rather decrease the expense, always 
having in view the use of the doors, windows and other material 
obtained the previous year and on hand. 

It was also determined to do the work by the day, under the direc- 
tion of a competent foreman. Mr. N. P. Starks was engaged and has 
filled the position in a satisfactory manner. 

The President's house is now completed and occupied, and is really 
a model of beauty and excellence in appearance as well as in comfort 
and convenience. The other house is not quite finished, but is brown- 
coated and will soon be ready for occupancy. It, too, is an excellent 
building, neat, comfortable and convenient. 

The whole season was so very unfavorable for building that the 
work has been done under many difiicultiesf, and at increased 
expense. For a part of the work, it was found impossible to get 
stone from any of the quarries in the neighborhood, or at Le Grand, 
in consequence of the continuous floods that prevailed, and, in order 
to do the work at all, it was found necessary to send to the Anamosa 
quarries, located at a great distance from the farm. The hauling of 
material was accomplished at a great additional expense over what it 
might have cost under favorable circumstances. The progress of the 
work was also delayed from those causes, all of which occasioned 
much vexation and annoyance to your committee and all parties con- 
nected with the work. The estimates for the buildings were much 
less than the actual cost has proved to be. 

STABLE. 

Your committee designed to erect a horse stable during the past 
season, and made some provision for materials. As the season pro- 
gressed and continual difficulties occurred in the erection of the 
other buildings, the project was abandoned. 

For a full account of the cost and expenditure on all the buildings 
and improvements during the year, see the report of the Cashier. 

COLLEGE BUILDING. 

Since your last annual meeting your committee have paid a bill 



62 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LKo. 16 



of paints and oils purchased by Mr. Eeichard from Page & Sprague, 
of Chicago, to the amount of $251.95. This amount should be 
added to the amount reported last year, as the full amount of cost 
of the completion of his contract. 

The amount reported by your committee last year as properly 
chargable to Mr. Eeichard was $8900.86. To this add the above 
amount, making in all $9152.81. The amount allowed Mr. 
Eeichard for extra work, as certified to by the architect and on the 
minutes of your last annual meeting, was $3605.75. This amount, 
deducted from the $9152.81, leaves a balance due the State of 
$5547.06. In order to settle up the whole matter, as far as Mr. 
Eeichard is concerned, your committee would recommend that he 
be released from any obligation to refund the amount due from 
him, as we are satisfied that he was the loser to that amount. The 
law making the appropriation, empowers your board to settle with 
him, and allow him for losses as you may deem just. 
Eespectfully submitted. 

Jl^O. EUSSELL, Chairman. 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



63 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

FOR 1868. 



To THE BOAKD OF TRUSTEES: 

Gentlemen : — The undersigned, members of the Executive Com- 
mittee, herewith submit the following report of our transactions for 
the year 1868. 

In accordance with your instructions we have purchased some 
additional stock, farm machinery, teams, etc., and made various 
improvements on the farm. For a more detailed statement thereof 
we refer you to the report of the Superintendent. 

It was intended to have erected several additional buildings for 
stable, granary, tool house, etc., but we were unable to procure brick 
except at exorbitant prices, and, not being satisfied from the experi- 
ments made with concrete blocks, that they were desirable for 
building material, we found the season so far advanced before we 
could form our plans, that it was determined to postpone the erection 
of these buildings until another year. With the erection of some 
additional sheds and repairs on barn and stable, we have provided 
sufficient accommodation for the present need. Some anticipated 
improvements upon the farm were delayed (hoping to get proper 
plans from Mr. Blair, landscape gardener, of Chicago,) until too 
late in the season to make them. 

Early in the year we authorized Mr. Thomson, Farm Superintend- 
ent, to make such purchase of teams as were needed to carry on the 
business of the farm ; this he did in a manner very satisfactory 
to us. 

After extensive correspondence, and after visiting some of the 



64 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



most celebrated herds of cattle in the United States and Canadas, 
we made purchases as follows : 

Of J as. O. Shelden of Geneva, New York, one short-horn 



bull calf I 600.00 

Three short-horn heifers 1000.00 

One Jersey or Alderney heifer 100.00 

Of Major George Greig, Canada West, one Ayshire 

cow (gold) 100.00 

Two Ayshire heifers (gold) 100.00 

Of Col. D. C. May, l^ew E-ochelle, Illinois, one Devon 

bull calf 150.00 

(Of which sum Col. May donated $25.00) 
Of Wm. Miller, Jr., of Canada West, five pure Co'swold 

sheep 200.00 

Six pure Southdown sheep TO.OO 



Of H. D. Court, of Michigan, one Chester White boar . . 20.00 
He donated one sow pig. 

We also have donations promised of sow pigs from Mr. Stewart | 
of Jackson county and Mr. Lovell of De Kalb, Illinois. 

We believe our purchases to be very advantageous to the farm. 
The short-horns are of excellent breeds, the bull being pure 
Oxford, got by Baron of Oxford out of Gem of Oxford, recorded 
in English as well as American herd book. The sheep were 
purchased at our State fair at very much lower figures than they 
\COdld have been obtained for in Canada, as we know by actual | 
observation. The Devon bull calf is also ve^y fine. 

Expecting to purchase stock in difierent localities, and the 
Chairman of Committee not accompanying us, we took with us 
our Superintendent, Mr. Thomson, to aid us not only in shipping, i 
but also by his advice in purchasing. | 

The crops on the farm were much injured by grasshoppers, so ' 
much so that from forty-eight acres of oats sown but 219 bushels 
were threshed, which will necessitate the purchase of corn to carry 
through our stock in proper condition, much to our regret, as we 
had hoped to make the farm self-sustaining in that respect at least. | 

All of which is respectfully submitted. ^ 

B. F. GUE, Chairman, \ 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



65 



BEPORT FOR 1869. 
To THE BoAKD OF TRUSTEES I 

Gentlemen : The details of the college and farm affairs for the 
past year have been so fully set forth in the reports of the Presi- 
dent and Superintendent, that but little additional remains to be 
given by your committee. 

LAND DEPARTMENT. 

In accordance with instructions of your Board, we proceeded to 
an examination of the affairs of the Land Department, for the pur- 
pose of giving the agent instructions in relation to forfeited leases. 

After conference with Mr. Bassett, we gave him the following 
written instructions : 

To Hon. Geo. W. Bassett, Land Agent of the Iowa State 
Agricultural College : 

You are hereby authorized and directed to re-lease such of the 
college lands, as by the terms of the former lease have been for- 
feited for non-payment of interest; and in such releasing you will 
observe the following directions : 

1st. Dec]are and enter upon your books a forfeiture of those 
leases only upon which interest is delinquent for one year or more. 

2d. The said lands which were leased under the appraisement 
made in the year 1865, may be leased at a price per acre not less 
than 50 per cent additional to the price of said tracts under 
such appraisement. 

The lands which were leased under the second valuation, as de- 
termined by chapter Yl, of the acts of the Eleventh General As- 
sembly, may be released at a price per acre not less than the said 
valuation, as shown by your books, increased by the amount of 
delinquent interest, computed to the date of releasing. 

3rd. The lessee assumes all risk as to the validity of the mode 
of enforcing a forfeiture of the first lease ; and shall have no claim 
against said college, or the State of Iowa on account of any right 
9 



66 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



or interest, legal or equitable, if there be sucb, still remaining in 
said first lessee or his assignees in and to said premises. 

In case the outstanding forfeited lease shall be surrendered, you^ 
are authorized to release such tracts under the usual forms of lease 
heretofore used. 

4:th. If the applicants shall prefer a foreclosure of the outstand- 
ing lease before taking a second lease upon any tract, and will pay 
all expenses of such action, you are authorized to proceed in behalf 
of said college to bring said action, and when deciee of foreclosure 
shall have been rendered, you are authorized to issue to said appli-. 
cant, upon making the required payment, a lease in the form here- 
tofore used by you in leasing said lands. 

5th. If it shall be decided by the Supreme Court of the State 
of Iowa or the Circuit Court of the United States, that said out- 
standing losses do not require foreclosure to perfect the forfeiture, 
you are authorized to release said forfeited lands, using the usual 
forms of lease, and you are authorized to bring the necessary action 
to test said question of forfeiture. 

Signed, this 22d of June, 1869. 

B. F. GUE, 

R. W. HUMPHREY, 

JNO. RUSSELL, 

Committee, 

SIOUX CITY LANDS. 

The interest fund accumulating from leased lands being greater 
than the present wants of the college seemed to require, the Board 
resolved to invest a portion thereof in the college land scrip of 
other States, In accordance with this resolution scrip was 
purchased and lands amounting in the aggregate to 15,013.18 
acres were selected and located in the counties of Buena Yista, 
Cherokee, Plymouth, Dickinson, Lyon and Sionx at a cost of 
(including all fees and expenses) a little over $1.05 per acre, or 
a total of $15,926.55. These lands were apraised at from $2.00 
to ^2.50 per acre, and are being rapidly taken up at those rates. 

In the location of the College scrip, purchased by direction of 
the Board of Trustees with surplus interest fund, the Land Office 



No. 16.] 



AaRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



67 



required the location to be made in the name of an individual, re- 
fusing to locate it in the name of the State, as not in accordance 
with law. 

Consequently we located the scrip in the name of J. C. Cusey. 

After the location was made, Mr. Cusey deeded the land to the 
Board of Trustees, whereas it should have been deeded to the State 
of Iowa. When the mistake was discovered, new deeds were made 
out by Mr. Cusey to the State of Iowa, and sent to the different 
counties in which the land was located. 

Upon presentation of the scrip to the Land Department, one 
piece was pronounced counterfeit, and notice sent to the Land Of- 
fice. 

Upon examination it was found that this piece was procured 
of Tylerl& Ullman, of Chicago, who express their willingness to 
refund the amount paid upon the presentation of the counterfeit 
piece with the proper affidavits. 

We directed the Register of the Land Office, to procure, and 
send to the Land Department, a genuine piece to replace the 
counterfeit, and return the latter to us, to be redeemed by the firm 
from whom it was procured. We have not yet received the coun- 
terfeit piece from Washington, but will attend to the redemption of 
it, as soon as it is returned. 

SECRETARY AND SUPERINTENDENT. 

At the August meeting of your committee, Hon. H. M. 
Thomson handed in his resignation as superintendent and secre- 
tary, to take effect on the 30th of September. 

P. S. Brown, one of the advanced students, was appointed by the 
committe to fill the vacancy until the meeting of the Board in 
January. 

At a meeting held on the 30th day of November, we examined 
the books and vouchers of the President, Cashier and Secretary, and 
found the expenditures properly accounted for. 

FARM. 

The Superintendent will give you a distinct statement of operations 
on the farm, and it will be unnecessary here to re-capitulate. 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

The farm, although in much better condition than two years since, 
is far from being a model one, as, indeed, how could it be without 
funds for its improvement. No appropriations have ever been made, 
with the exception of the proceeds of a few hundred acres of Jasper 
county lands, and one thousand dollars for the specific purpose of 
drainage. 

What improvements there are have been made with the proceeds of 
the sales, from time to time, of the small parcels of land donated 
by citizens of Story and Boone counties, and the sales of surplus 
produce. In the same manner a beginning has also been made in 
stocking the farm. 

Legislative appropriations will be needed to continue the farm 
improvements and increase its stock. At the very lowest estimate, six 
thousand dollars will be needed for the former purpose, for the ensu- 
ing two years, and ten thousand dollars to increase its stock. Donble 
these amounts can be judiciously expended, and we confidently 
appeal to the liberality of the legislature in making appropriations 
for the above named objects. The fine stock upon the farm should 
be in such numbers that farmers from any part of the State might be 
certain, at any time, of finding there for sale, at reasonable prices, i 
good animals wherewith to improve their own stock. The College i 
Farm might thus be of almost incalculable value to the State at large. 
When we take into consideration the fact that single herd animals of 
either sex often sell for one thousand dollars, and not unfrequently at 
from three to five thousand, it will be seen how very small is the 
appropriation named. A good cattle barn is also needed ; estimated 
<cost of a suitable one,"$7,500,00. 

Attention is also called to the necessity of additional grazing lands, 
and the necessary legislative action requested to enable us to use of 
the interest fund to obtain it. 

The estimated value of stock upon the farm at present, is as fol- 



lows, to-wit: 

Cattle— fifty-four |Y,185.00 

Horses— five 655.00 

Mules— two 500.00 

Sheep— one hundred and twenty-three 887.00 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



69 



Swine — sixty -three 
Poultry —sixty . . . . 



$ 420.00 
54.00 



COLLEGE. 



Estimate of appropriations needed, to furnish further facilities 
necessary to the growth of the Iowa State Agricultural College in 
accordance with plans as stated in President's report. 

Extension of wings to present building $50,000.00 

Additional dormitories for young men .... 85,000.00 

Laboratory 5,000.00 

Work-shop 5,000.00 

House over gasometer 500.00 

One house for use of Professor's family .... 4,500.00—150,000.00 

Your committee, at its meeting, N"ovember 30, 1869, exam- 
ined the accounts of Hon. B. F. Gue, Chairman of the Committee 
on Organization, and the special Committee for the purchase of 
College scrip and the location of lands. We found vouchers for all 
money drawn from the Treasury for the purpose of paying for 
furniture, scrip and other bills, covering the full amount charged 
against him. Your committee were instructed at the last annual 
meeting to settle the accounts of Mr. Melendy also, but not having 
met with him, or been furnished with his bills, we have been un- 
able to make the settlement desired. 



Kespectfully submitted, 



JOHN KUSSELL, Chairman. 



70 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



LAND DEPARTMENT. 



To THE Board of Trustees : 

Gentlemen : The subjoined report of the transactions of the Land 
Department of the College for the year ending December 31, 1869, 
is hereby submitted for your consideration : 

During the year interest has been collected and paid Treasurer as 



follows : 

Mar. 31. First quarter ending Mar. 31 1869 $8393.86 

June 30. Second quarter ending June 30, '69 6404.74 

Sept 30. Third quarter ending Sept. 30, 1869 9627.32 

Dec. 32. Fourth quarter ending Dec. 31 '69 6595.51 

Mar. 81. Amt. paid Treasurer, voucher No. 21 $8393.86 
June 30. Amt. paid Treasurer, voucher No. 22 6404.74 
Sept 30. Amt. paid Treasurer, voucher No. 23 9627.32 
Dec. 31. Amt. paid Treasurer, voucher No. 24 6595.51 

$31021.43 — 31021.43 

Amt. coll. on leases paid up during the year 3005.14 
Sept 30. Amt remitted to Treas., voucher No. 1 $240.00 
Nov. 4. Amt remitted to Treas. voucher No. 2 2485.14 
Dec 31. Amt remitted to Treas. voucher No. 3 280.00 

$3050.14— 3005.14 

No. of acres leased during the year 13444.92 

No. of acres leased prior to Dec. 31, 1868 190611.77 

No. of acres undisposed of 149.67 



Total No. of acres in the grant 



$204206.36 



Ifo. 16. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Valuation of lands leased during the year $ 43103.46 

Valuation of lands leased prior to Dec 31, 1868 444505.13 

Total valuation of lands leased 487608.59 

Total valuation of lands unleased 449.01 

Total valuation of grant $488057.60 

Average valuation per acre, $2.39. 

ANNUAL REVENUE OF COLLEGE. 

57436.34 acres, valuation $109459.44 at 6 per cent $ 6567.56 

146620.35 " " 378149.15 8 « 30251.91 

204056.69 " " 1487608.59 36819.49 

Total payment of interest to Dec. 31, 1868 66754.21 

Total payment of interest from Dec 31, 1868 to Dec. 31, 

1869 31021.43 



Total interest collected and paid over to Dec. 31, 1869 ' $97775.64 

Patents have been received on all the leases above reported as 
paid up. 

The number of acres in the grant was reported to be 204,309.30, 
whereas the actual number of acres is 204,2u6.36, a difference of 
102.94 acres. The report showed the several quarter sections on 
the north line of the State as full, whereas the State line cuts a 
fraction off from them. 

The only tract of land belonging to the grant that has not been 
leased is the nw. qr. 30, tp. 97, r. 28, which has not been offered 
on account of conflict of title with swamp land selection. 

The following instructions from the committee, to whom was 
referred the question of forfeited leases, have been received : 

To Geo. W. Bassett, Agent for the Iowa Agricultural College : 

You are hereby authorized and directed to release such of the 
college lands as by the terms of the former lease have been forfeited 
for non-payment of interest, and in such re-leasing you will observe 
the following directions : 



72 



AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



1st. Declare and enter upon your books a forfeiture of those 
leases only upon which interest is delinquent for one year or more. 

2d. The said lands which were leased under the appraisement 
made in the year 1865, may be leased at a price per acre not less 
than 50 per cent additional to the price of each of said tracts under 
such appraisement. 

The lands which were leased under the second valuation, as de- 
termined by chapter 71, of the acts of the Eleventh General As- 
sembly, may be re leased at a price per acre not less than the said 
valuation as shown by your books, increased by the amount of 
delinquent interest, computed to the date of re-leasing. 

3d. The lessee assumes all risk, as to the validity of the mode 
of enforcing a forfeiture of the first lease, and shall have no claim 
against said college, or the State of Iowa, on account of any right 
or interest, legal or equitable, if there be sach still remaining in 
said first lessee, or his assignee, in and to said premises. In case 
the outstanding, forfeited lease shall be surrendered, you are au- 
thorized to release such tracts under the usual form of lease here- 
tofore used. 

4th, If the applicant shall prefer a foreclosure of the outstand- 
ing lease, before taking a second lease upon any tract, and will pay 
all expenses of such action, you are authorized to proceed in 
behalf of said college, to bring said action, and when decree of 
foreclosure shall have been rendered, you are authorized to issue 
to said applicant, upon making the required payment, a lease in 
the form heretofore used by you in leasing said lands. 

5th. If it shall be decided by the Supreme Court of the State 
of Iowa, or the Circuit Court of the United States, that said out- 
standing leases do not require foreclosure to perfect the forfeiture, 
you are authorized to release said forfeited lands, issuing the usual 
form of lease, and you are authorized to bring the necessary action 
to test said question of forfeiture. 

Signed, this 22d day of June, 1869. 

B. F. GUE, 

K. W. HUMPIIKEY, 

JOim KUSSELL, 

Committee. 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



73 



Under these instructions I proceeded to declare 173 leases forfeited 
for nonpayment of interest, and have re-leased 66 of them, inserting 
a condition in all cases where the first lease had not been surrendered, 
that the second lessee accepted the lease subject to all the rights of 
first lessee or his assignees. I have also brought an action in this 
District Court to test the rights of the original lessee in lease 
forfeited for non-payment of interest. The District Court decided 
that the first lessee in such cases had no rights or interest, and the 
Greneral Term of the Circuit Court has confirmed this decision, 
the case will go before the Supreme Court this winter for its decision. 
I have no doubt but that the decision of the District Court and the 
General Term of the Circuit Court will be confirmed by the Supreme 
Court, in which case interest will be paid more promptly, as in case 
of non-payment, forfeitures can be declared and the lands re-leased 
to parties who will pay the interest. 

The money collected, has been paid over to the Treasurer quar- 
terly, according to the terms of my contract, and quarterly reports 
have been made to the Secretary of the college. 

Accompanying this is a report showing each tract leased, No. of 
lease, name of lessee, the number of acres in each tract, and its 
valuation, and the amount of interest received thereon, up to Dec. 
31, 1869, and the office fee received on each lease. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

GEO. W. BASSETT, Agent Iowa Ag. Oollege. 

(Per J. D. Strow.) 



10 



74 



AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT. 



03 C 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entrance fee. 




$14: 


loo l\} 


1 A 
14 


170 AA 
<<i UU 


1 A 
14 


1^ < yn 


1 A 
14 


1 PiQ AA 


OQ 


1 kQ fiA 

loo OU 


OQ 
AO 


4 DU 


1 A 
14 


121 64 


14 


64 82 


14 


1 AQ OA 
lUO 


14 


to 40 


14 


•TQ /I ft 
io 40 


1 A 

14 


4 / OO 


1 A 
14 


4 » 00 


1 A 
14 


4 4 00 


14 


'7'7 Qft 
4 4 OO 


^A 
14 


Q1 A s:ft 
OlU 00 


1 A 
14 


1 A ^ QA 
1U4 oU 


1 A 
14 


1 OQ QA 
1^0 OU 


1 A 
14 


1 A 1 QA 


14 


1 OQ QA 
1^0 oU 


1 A 
14 


Qft 

40 oO 


1 A 
14 


1 OQ 7ft 
1^0 40 


OQ 


1 ftQ AA 
loo UU 


1 A 
14 


i flQ AA 

loo UU 


1 A 
14 


■i A A AA 
144 UU 


-( A 
14 


■\ Oil 0(l 

167 00 


OQ 

AO 


np AA 

yo UU 


14 


i no AA 

ly^ UU 


1 A 
14 


ftA 

1 oU 


1 A 

14 


r^o A A 

4 2 UU 


14 


~^."» A A 

4 2 UU 


1 A 

14 


170 A A 

72 UU 


X4 


1717 -i Ct 

77 12 


14 


441 35 


00 


168 00 


14 


168 Oo 


14 


cm AA 

yo UU 


1 A 
14 


f\t' AA 

yo UU 


14 


HA ftA 
o4 OU 


14 


84 00 


14 


84 00 


14 


80 07 


14 


153 58 


14 


168 00 


14 


168 00 


14 


187 80 


14 


187 05 


14 


62 40 


14 


62 40 


14 


(>2 40 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


62 40 


14 



1 

2 
3 
4 
4 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
13 
18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 



ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr... 
se qr. . . 
n lif . . . . 
s hf . . . . 
neqr. . . 
ne qr . . 
se qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr. . , 
nwqr. . 
sw qr . . 
se qr. . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 

all 

sw qr . . 
nw qr . , 
se qr . . , 
ne qr. . , 
ne qr. . . 
j swqr, 
] se qr , 
ne qr. . , 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
s hf . . . 
ne qr. . 
n hf . . . 
se qr . . , 
ne qr. . 
nw qr . 
sw qr . 
se qr . . 
alL ... 
se qr . . 
se ((r . . 
se qr . . 
sw qr . . 
ne qr. . 
ne qr. . 
se qr. . 
ne qr . . 
nw qr . 
se qr. . 
ne qr. . 
nw qr . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. . 
nw qr . 
seqr. . 
se qr . . 
sw qr. . 
swqr.. 



28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
36 

6 
36 
34 
24 
24 
24 
24 
25 
25 

2 

14 
14 
4 
4 
28 
36 
35 
34 
34 
28 
2 
26 
24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
12 
24 
4 
6 
11 
11 
2 
15 
15 
10 
23 
24 
18 
18 
18 
36 
36 
36 
35 
35 
25 



89 
89 
89 
98 

96 
89 
89 
89 
95 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
89 
89 
89 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 
89 
93 
90 
89 
89 
89 
97 
97 
97 
97 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
320 00 
320 00 
160 00 
188 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
642 48 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



320 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
28 i 320 00 
28,160 00 
28 320 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
640 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
188 10 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
178 86 
178 15 
160 00 
1()0 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00| 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
34 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
31 
27 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
97130 
97 30 



480 00 
480 00, 
240 00| 
480 00 
640 00 
640 00 
240 00 
376 00 
240 00 
320 00 
280 00 
280 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
963 72 C 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
280 06 



G. B. Starr 

N. E. Tinker 

J. D. Strew 

W. H. Godair.... 

A. A. Call 

A. A. Call 

A. C. Call..... .. 

U. Heath 

1. Trembly 

W. L. Leggett 

M. H. Negus 

Rebecca Negus 

C. L. Webster 

J. B. McCalmont. . . 

J. C. Frail 

S. McCalmont 

G. Jones 

Yates 

D. Hakes 

T. Brooks 

S. Brooks 

Austin 



J. 
F. 
B. 

E. S. 
G. O. 



1865. 
July 21 



Aug. 



486 00 S. G. A. Reed 

560 00 A. Miller 

560 00 N. Miller 

480 00 F. F. Westerfield. . . 
640 00 D. E. Fergerson. . . . 
320 00 G. G. L>')ckhard. . . . 

640 00 J. M. Binkcrton 

240 00 Henry Durant Jr... 

240 00 Asa C. Call 

240 00 Asa C. Call 

240 00 Asa C. Call 

240 00 J. R. Mclntyre 

1600 00 G. H. Edgcrton .... 
560 00 J. M. Shepherd .... 
560 00 J. M. Shepherd.... 

320 00 J. C. Braley 

320 00 H. S. Braley 

282 13 C has. C. Chubb.... 
280 00 G. W. Olmstead.... 
280 00 G. W. Olmstead. . . . 
400 00 J. B. B. W. Moore . 

480 00 John Murphy 

560 00 E. D. G. Morgan.... 

560 00 F. D. Stone 

626 01 F. D. Stone 

623 52 F. D. Stone 

240 00 De Witt C. Conkey 
240 00 De Witt C. Coidtey 
240 00 Dc Witt C. Conkey 
240 00 De Witt C. Conkey 
240 00 De Witt C. Conkey 
240 00 De Witt C. Conkey 



18 



19 



28 



29 



30 



31 



AGEICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



75 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



Lease. 


<V 


Sec. 






Acres. 


Valua- 


0. of 


Pts. of 


d 


CO 

O 


a 


o.of 


c3 O 














55 


all 


26 


961 


30 


640 00 


$960 00 


56 


se qr . . . 


22 


98 


29 


160 00 


280 00 


57 


ne qr . . . 


32 


88 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


58 


se qr . . . 


32 


89 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


59 


nw qr . . 


30 


89 


30 


172 71 


604 48 


60 


ue qr . . . 


30 


89 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


61 


se qr . . . 


30 


89 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


62 


nw qr. . . 


9 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


63 


uw qr. . . 


4 


93 


27 


193 11 


482 77 


64 


se qr . . . 


4 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


65 


se qr . . . 


8 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


66 


sw qr . . . 


2 


96 


28 


160 00 


320 00 


67 


se qr . . . 


26 


98 


29 


160 00 


280 00 


68 


sw qr 


36 


97 


29 


160 00 


240 00 


69 


se qr . . . 


2 


96 


29 


160 00 


320 00 


70 


se qr . . . 


15 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


71 


sw qr . . . 


15 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


72 


sw qr . . . 


22 


93 


27 


160 00 


400 00 


73 


ne qr . . . 


9 


95 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


74 


w llf . . . 


14 


95 


28 


320 00 


528 00 


75 


w lif . . . 


6 


94 


30 


329 67 


494 50 


76 


e llf ... . 


4 


94 


30 


325 47 


488 20 


77 


e llf ... . 


30 


95 


30 


320 00 


480 00 


78 


se qr . . . 


28 


88 


29 


160 00 


240 00 


79 


nw qr. . 


28 


98 


29 


160 09 


280 00 


80 


w llf . . . 


23 


96 


30 


320 00 


480 00 


81 


j e hf . . 


23 










( nw qr. 


14 


96 


30 


480 00 


720 00 


82 


nw qr . . 


21 


95 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


83 


sw qr . . 


21 


95 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


84 


se qr 


10 


89 


31 


160 00 


400 00 


85 


sw qr . . 


10 


89 


31 


160 00 


400 00 


86 


se qr . . . 


8 


89 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


87 


nw qr . . 


18 


89 


31 


172 86 


432 15 


88 


ne qr . . . 


18 


89 


31 


160 00 


400 00 


89 


sw qr . . 


29 


96 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


90 


w llf . . . 


32 


96 


30 


320 00 


480 00 


91 


se qr . . . 

e hf 


29 


96 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


92 


32 


96 


30 


320 00 


480 00 


93 


ne qr . . . 


5 


95 


30 


187 77 


328 60 


94 


nw qr . . 


5 


95 


30 


187 67 


328 42 


95 


sw qr . . 


13 


96 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


96 


nw qr . . 


22 


98 


29 


160 00 


240 00 


97 


ne qr. . . 


14 


95 


28 


160 00 


280 00 


98 


sw qr . . 


21 


96 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


99 


all , . . . 


32 


90 


24 


640 00 


1600 00 


100 


all 


30 


90 


24 


639 30 


1598 25 


101 


sw qr . . 


24 


90 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


102 


sw qr . . 


34 


89 


30 


160 00 


560 00 


103 


se qr . . . 


14 


95 


28 


160 00 


280 00 


104 


sw qr . . 


8 


89 


31 


160 00 


400 00 


105 


ne qr. . . 


8 


89 


31 


160 00 


400 00 


106 


se qr . . . 


6 


94 


30 


160 00 


240 00 


107 


1 j n hf . . 

1 ] sw qr 


8 
5 


94 


30 


480 00 


720 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
28 
28 
28 
28 
14 
14 
28 

42 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
28 
14 
28 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
56 
56 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 



S. C. Hogue 

W. Gibbons 

Chas. Giesler . . . 
Chas. Giesler . . . 

H. Hayodorn 

H. Hayodorn . . . 
H. Hayodorn . . . 
Henry G. Tyler. 
Henry G. Tyler. 
Henry G. Tyler. 
Henry G. Tyler. 
Geo. B. Culver. . 
Geo. B. Culver. . 
Geo. B. Culver. . 
Geo. B. Culver. . 
Mary E. Weller. 
Mary E. Weller. 
Mary E. Weller. 

S. B. Hatch 

S. M. Whitbeck. 
P. Dorweiler . . . 
P. Dorweiler . . . 
P. Dorweiler . . . 
Geo. O. Austin. . 

E. Searle 

L. Boyle 



L. B. Read 

O. F. Kiumonth. . 
O. F. Kinmonth. . 

■Joseph Yates 

J. Van Home 

S. Q. Duntly 

J. H, Ortrom .... 

8. Q. Duntly 

H. P. Hatch 

H. P. Hatch 

E. Hatch 

Mason Leach 

Mason Leach. . . . , 

A. Holdridge 

H. T. Merriam. . . 
D. D. Wadsworth 
C. M. Dickerson. . 

A. Johnson 

B. F. Waterman. . 
H. W. Dutcher . . 

A. Loehr 

Peter Krell ....... 

Albert Swain .... 

H. Willey 

H. Willey & Carr 
J. Pohlmann , 



Aug. 31 
Sept. 1 
2 



5 

".14 



".15 



.16 



,18 



.19 



.".27 



Oct. 



288 00 

67 20 
179 20 
179 20 
193 39 
145 60 
145 60 
104 00 
154 45 
128 00 
128 00 
102 40 

89 60 
76 80 
102 40 
104 00 
104 00 
104 00 
76 80 

135 96 
127 32 
125 69 
123 60 

33 00 
88 90 
123 60 

185 40 
76 20 
76 20 
102 80 
102 80 
143 88 

136 92 
102 

61 68 
130 56 

76 
123 36 

84 46 

84 40 

68 88 
61 68 
71 90 
6144 

409 33 
408 87 
142 80 
142 80 

88 20 
120 00 
120 00 

61 20 



183 60 42 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. LNo. 16. 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



C cd 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



108 
109 
110 
111 
113 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 



sw qr. 
e hf. . 
se qr. . 
lie qr. 
se qr. . 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr.. 
sw qr, 
sw qr. 
se qr. . 

122 neqr. 

123 se qr. 



324 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 

140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 



se qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr . , 
sw qr. 
ne qr . , 
nw qr 12 



$93 27 



93 



27 



100 34 
100 

97 

97 

97 

97 

96 



12 



sw qr 
se qr. , 
se qr. , 
ne qr. 
all . . . 
swqr. , 
nw qr 29 
se qr. , 
nw qr 
se qr. . 
s hf. . 
n hf . . 
ne qr. 
nw qr. 
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sw qr. 
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ne qr . 
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nw qr 
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sw qr. 
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ne qr. 
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nw qr 28 
nw qr 23 



141 96 



95 30 
95130 
95 28 
96 
93 
94 
96 



96 
96 
95 
94 
96 
94 
96 
90 
90 
94 
99 
89 
96 
96 
96 27 
96 27 



160 00 
320 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
640 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

640 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
158 51 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
151 96 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
100 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
100 00 



400 00 
800 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
400 00 
400 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
1600 00 
320 00 
240 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 

960 00 
240 00 
320 00 
240 00 
396 27 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
227 94 
240 00 
240 00 
480 00 
480 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 



Marshall Fleming. . 

E. McLaurey 

0. A. Frederickson . 

J. A. Lucas 

S. A. Wilson 

W. K. Vickroy 

Robbins & Lowry. 
Henry Robbins . . . 

Chas. Wilkins 

Chas. Wilkins 

Chas. Wilkins 

Chas. Wilkins 

P. Dorwiler 



Oct. 2. 



W. Macintosh 

Maria Shney 

H. W. Loppin 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Call 

S. Woodward. . . 

A. Woodward 

Geo. Phillips 

J. H. Hutchinson . 

Jacob Meads 

D. M. Crane 

John Christen.. 

IM. M. Abbey 

J. W. Moore 

Geo. Wilcox 



John Brann 

Chas. Evans 

Geo. M. Peer 

A. D. Clark 

S. S. Saterlee 

Isaiah Dalrymple . 
Isaiah Dalrymple 
Isaiah Dalrymple 
Isaiah Dalrymple 
Isaiah Dalrymple 
J. A. Dalrymple . 
J. A. Dalrymple . 
H. C. Phillips.... 
H. C. Phillips. . . . 
Jacob Carstens. . . 
Jacob Carstens. . . 

J. Davidson 

A . Habcrnicht 

H. Habcrnicht 

A. J. Pitcher 

A. R. Kennedy. . . 

Z. S. Sabin 

A. Croup 



Oct. 5.. 



.10. 



,.16. 



.17. 



.25. 



....30.. 
....31. 



Nov. 1, 



No. 16.1 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 77 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



^ 2 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
183 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 



sw qr.|34 
nw qr| 8 
ne qr. 10 
aw qr|lO 



w hf. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
w lif. 
w lif.. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
sw qr. 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
se qr. 
se qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr, 
se qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
ne' qr . 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
ehf .. 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr 
se qr . 
w lif . 
n hf.. 
s hf. . 
s hf . . 
sw qr 
n hf.. 
s hf .. 
nw qr 



97 28 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
89|23 
89i23 



89 



94 29 
94 30 
94 30 
94 30 
,94 30 



316lne qr. 



94 
94 
94 
95 
96 
94 
97 
97 
97 
94 
95 
97 
95 
97 
93 
96 
96 
97 
97 
96 
95 
95 
95 
96 
96 
95 
95 



30 
29 
29 
28 
28 
30 
29 
29 
29 
29 
28 
29 
30 
28 
27 
2' 
27 
29 
29 
27 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
95130 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
381 92 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
339 58 
320 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
165 86 
167 
160 00 
160 00 
152 55 
147 92 
160 001 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
348 40 
150 01 
208 31 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
344 
320 00 
320 00 
320 00 
160 00 
376 70 
320 00 
188 15 
210 00 



400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
954 80 
400 09 
400 00 
400 00 
848 95 
800 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
320 00 
240 00 
248 79 
250 59 
240 00 
240 00 
305 10 
295 84 
240 00 
320 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
320 00 
320 00 
240 00 
522 60 
300 02 
520 77 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
516 54 
640 00 
480 00 
480 00 
240 00 
565 05 
480 00 
282 22 
315 00 



A. M. Sumner . . . 
J. B. Edams 

B. B. Howard . . . . 

T. D. Snow 

F. S. Dunning . . . 

D. W. Slanter..., 

0. H. Ives 

Edwin Hull 

W. E. Trude 

J. S. Olson , 

A. Brown , 

L. McNe 

S. C. Huff. 

Jas. Cahill 

Geo. W. Mingle. 

O. M. Miner 

J. Guming 

W. A. Levalley . 

E. S. Reynolds.. 

W. Cahill 

W. Ringstorf 

W. A. Seller 

J. L. Smith 

H. H. Purhee . . . 
J. W. Purhee.... 

C. B. Purhee.... 

Geo. Holm 

J. G. Pengree. . . 

Jas. Price 

W. H. Ingham. . . 
R. W. Woods . . . 

H. Ebert 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Oall 

A. Mackey 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Call 

Asa C. Call 

Mary C. Finch. . 
G. W. Wallace . . 

M. Taylor 

W. H. Ingnham. 
W. E. Wilson. . . 
W. E. Wilson. . . 
W. E. Wilson. . . 
J. W. Frazer 

D. A. Barrett . . , 
D. A. Barrett . . , 

J. P. Foster 

J. P. Foster 

J. P. Foster 

J. P. Foster...., 

J. P. Foster 

J. P. Foster 



Nov. 



Sept. 25 



Nov. 



11 



,22 



Aug. 31 



.52 00 
124 00 
124 00 
100 00 
238 68 
100 00 
100 00 
124 00 
263 23 
248 00 
124 00 
124 00 
100 00 
102 40 
126 40 
126 40 
126 40 
102 40 
126 40 
102 40 
80 00 
59 85 
62 16 
77 41 
74 16 
74 16 
94 25 
91 41 
16 50 
79 52 
73 92 
45 16 
59 56 
59 56 
98 61 
79 41 

73 96 
129 61 

74 45 
129 16 

59 52 
59 52 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
127 26 
192 00 
144 00 
144 00 
72 00 
169 50 
144 00 
84 65 
94 50 



$14 
14 
14 
14 
28 
14 
14 
14 
28 
28 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
28 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
28 



28 
14 
28 



14 
14 



78 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
REPORT OF LAND AGENT.— Continued. 



[No. 16/ 



I 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease 



317 se qr. 
218' 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 



se qr . . 

sw qr. 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
sw qr. 
se qr . . 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
se qr. 
nw qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr 
se qr 
sw qr 
se qr, 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
se qr . . 
ne qr . 
nw qr 
se qr . . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr. 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr 
se qr. . 
sw qr 



255 isw qr. 



256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 



ne qr. 
se qr.. 
sw qr. 
sw qr. 
nw qr. 
se qr. 
ue qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
ne (jr. 
nw qr 
nw i\r 
ne qr. 



24 
24 
24 
13 
13 
2 
12 
12 
4 
18 
18 
18 
18 
24 
24 
24 
24 
12 
12 
12 
12 
14 
14 
14 
32 
12 
12 
12 
20 
29 
11 
11 
28 
28 
28 
14 
24 
1 
1 
22 
10 



95128 
95 1 28 
95 28 
95|28 
95 28 



160 00 
160 00 
158 01 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 09 
188 45 
162 88 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

158 77 

159 59 

160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
100 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
212 40 
210 80 
160 00 
160 00 



$ 240 00 
240 00 

237 01 
280 00 
280 00 
280 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
329 77 
325 76 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
320 00 
320 00 
320 00 
240 00 
240 00 
400 00 
240 00 

238 15 

239 38 

240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
400 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
320 00 
531 00 
527 00 



J. P. Foster 

H. Hawkins 

E. E. Thomas 

A. A. Vroman 

Asa C. Call 

Henry Cunan 

D. H. Fitch 

A. Eaton 

H. N. Cowen 



Erick Kmitesen. 

E. J. Tracy 

E. J. Tracy 

J. B. Dwinnell. . 
Seth H. Tracy . . 
Seth H. Tracy.. . 
Seth H. Tracy... 
Seth H. Tracy..., 
Seth H. Tjacy..., 
Seth H. Tracy..., 

E. H. Irwin 

S. H. Tracy 

S. H. Tracy 

ABamell&H Smith 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . . . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 
Wm. H. Dwelle.. 
Wm. H. Dwelle. . 



Aug. 
Nov. 



Nov. 



Nov. 6 



H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

Sarah Dwelle 

Sarah Dwelle 

Sarah Dwelle 

J. O. Curtis 

Seth H, Tracey. . 
Seth H. Tracey. . 
Setli H. Tracey. . 
Thos. Dawson . . . 
A. C. Call........ 

M. Colt 

John Gough 

R. L. Adams 

John Love 

H. Stow 

J. Q. A. Hudson.. 
Wm. H. Henry. . . 

Mary Parker 

S. M. Parker 

320 OOlSaml. M. Henry.. 
400 00|Wm. H. Henry... 



Nov. 
Nov. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Aug. 



Nov. 30 



Dec. 



$ 72 00 
15 84 
72 52 
85 68 
85 68 
35 28 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
82 45 
81 13 
59 76 
59 76 
59 76 
79 68 
79 68 

98 88 
59 76 
59 76 
26 40 
58 88 
58 43 
58 71 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 
58 88 

99 00 
72 00 
72 00 
72 00 
58 80 
58 80 
58 80 
58 80 
58 80 
58 80 
58 801 
58 80 
78 40 

130 10| 
160 731 
78 40 
50 00 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



79 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



<D 
W 


ci 

<v 








m 


03 

o 


m 


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m 
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QC 


% 

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Ph 




272 


se qr. 


33 


99 


34 


160 00 $ 


273 


sw qr. 


30 


95 


37 


163 43 


274 


w hf. . 


27 


96 


27 


330 00 


275 


e hf . . 


27 


96 


27 


330 00 


276 


w hf .136 


96 


27 


330 00 


277 


ne qr. 


34 


96 


27 


160 00 


278 


se qr . 


34 


96 


27 


160 00 


279 


se qr . 


36 


96 


37 


160 00 


280 


nw qr 


35 


96 


27 


160 00 


381 


e hf . . 


35 


96 


27 


330 00 


282 


w hf . 


36 


96 


37 


330 00 


283 


n hf. . 


3 


94 


30 


333 58 


284 


s hf. . 


3 


94 


30 


330 00 


285 


all . . . 


10 


94 


30 


640 00 


286 


n hf . . 


04 


99 


34 


415 94 


287 uw qr 


34 


96 


30 


160 00 


288 


lie qr. 


34 


96 


30 


160 00 


289 


ne qr. 


1 


95 


28 


197 00 


290 


se qr . 


1 


95 


38 


160 00 


291 


se qr . 


10 


95 


38 


160 00 


292 


se qr . 


4 


95 


30 


160 00 


293 


se qr . 


9 


95 


30 


160 00 


294 


nw qr 


38 


9934 


160 00 


295 


sw qr. 


33 


99 


34 


160 00 


296 


se qr . 


36 


95 


30 


160 00 


297 


ne qr. 


14 


94 


38 


160 00 


398 


!iw qr 


14 


94 


38 


160 00 


299 


nw qr 


7 


95 


30 


157 31 


300 


ne qr. 


30 


96 


30 


160 00 


301 


se qr . 


30 


96 


30 


160 00 


303 


nw qr 


30 


96 


30 


160 00 


303 


ne qr. 


36 


96 


31 


160 00 


304 


nw qr 


31 


96 


30 


160 00 


305 


sw qr . 


35 


95 


30 


160 00 


306 


sw qr . 


34 


90 


34 


160 00 


307 


sw qr . 


1 


99 


36 


160 00 


308 


ne qr. 


3 


99 


36 


191 65 


309 


nw qr 


3 


99 


36 


191 31 


310 


se qr . 


3 


99 


36 


160 00 


311 


sw qr . 


9 


99 


36 


160 00 


313 


sw C[r . 


9 


99 


36 


160 00 


313 


ne qr 


32 


99 


36 


160 00 


314 


nw qr 


33 


99 


36 


160 00 


315 


se qr . 


14 


99 


36 


160 00 


316 


se qr . 


21 


99 


36 


160 00 


317 


se qr . 


37 


100 


36 


160 00 


318 


se (][r . 


33 


100 


36 


160 00 


319 


sw'qr. 


12 


96 


30 


160 00 


330 


nw qr 


13 


96 


30 


160 00 


331 


se qr . 


3 


96 


30 


160 00 


333 


sw qr. 


3 


96 


30 


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333 


se qr . 


31 


96 


371 160 00 


334 


ne oj. 


31 


96 


37 


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335 


ne qr. 


3e 


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37 


160 00 


326 


nw qi 


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9C 


37 


160 00 



,—1 3 

l5 O 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entrance fee' 


$ 73 00 


Il4 


80 41 


14 


118 34 


38 


118 34 


38 


118 34 


38 


59 13 


14 


59 13 


14 


59 13 


14 


59 13 


14 


118 34 


28 


118 34 


28 


133 35 


28 


118 34 


28 


336 48 


56 


187 15 


28 


60 00 


14 


60 00 


14 


98 50 


14 


70 00 


14 


99 30 


14 


70 00 


14 


74 40 


14 


73 00 


14 


73 00 


14 


115 30 


14 


38 40 


14 


38 40 


14 


28 31 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 30 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


38 80 


14 


96 00 


14 


115 30 


14 


138 00 


14 


137 68 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 


115 30 


14 



240 00 
326 86 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 P, 
240 00 
480 00 
480 00 
500 37 
480 00 
960 00 
633 91 
340 00 
340 00 
394 00 
320 00 
330 00 
380 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 
360 00 
480 00 
480 00 
353 95 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
360 00 
431 31 
430 33 
360 00 



J. P. Foster. . . 
John Wilson. . 
S. T. Woodard, 



Dec. 
Nov. 



A. Woodward. 



CJ. Young.. 

Danford Eddy, 



J. D. Smith 

A. M. Lull 

H. Hamilton . . . 

J. D. Strow 

P. H. Gunnison. 



H. C. Hovey. 



Seth H. Tracey 
J. B. Dwinell . . 
S. H. Tracey . . , 
J. D. Strow 



Warren Walston . . . 



H. V. Hawkens 

Thomas Dawson . . . 
George Yan Yelson 

S. Booth 

D. H. Hopkins 

Wm. Whoiin 

M. AYare 

W. L. Le 



ggett 
J. L. Blair... 



D. D. Rvrie 

R. W. A'twood. . . 

B. F. Sargent 

360 00! David T. O wings 
360 00|D. S. Hoaglan . .. 
360 001 D. C. Adams .. .. 
360 00 1 Isaac Scarritt. . . . 

360 00 IJ. A. Ryrie 

360 O.O! George Johnston. 
360 00 John McDowell. . 



360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



L. E. Houghton. 
Harvy Yeech . . 
M. H. Topping . 
Gains Paddock . . 
Geo. E. Hawley . 
A. T. Hawley. .. 

Levi Davis 

Levi Davis, Jr. . 
James Johnston. 



July 31 
Dec. 1 
May33'66 



80 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



[No. 16. 



iNo. of Sec. 1 


Township. 


iRange. 1 


No. of acres. 


33 


95 


30 


160 00 


33 


95 


30 


160 00 


33 


95 


30 


160 00 


28 


95 


30 


160 00 


28 


95 


30 


160 00 


36 


96 


31 


160 00 


2 


95 


31 


160 00 


2 


95 


31 


160 00 


36 


96 


31 


160 00 


25 


96 


27 


160 00 


25 


96 


27 


160 00 


25 


96 


27 


160 00 


14 


96 


27 


160 00 


13 


96 


27 


160 00 


13 


96 


27 


160 00 


23 


96 


27 


160 00 


23 


96 


27 


160 00 


23 


96 


27 


160 00 


24 


96 


27 


160 00 


11 


96 


30 


160 00 


29 


100 


36 


160 00 


29 


100 


36 


160 00 


19 


97 


29 


160 00 


20 


97 


29 


160 00 


12 


84 


29 


160 00 


14 


84 


28 


160 00 


28 


85 


29 


160 00 


28 


85 


29 


160 00 


30 


85 


29 


160 00 


30 


85 


29 


152 66 


30 


85 


29 


160 00 


30 


85 


29 


155 00 


32 


85j29 


160 00 


32 


85 


29 


160 00 


32 


85 


29 


160 00 


32 


85 


29 


160 00 


36 


85 


29 


160 00 


36 


85 


29 


160 00 


36 


85 


29 


160 00 


36 


85 


29 


160 00 


15 


96 


30 


160 00 


10 


96 


30 


160 00 


10 


96 


30 


160 00 


6 


89 


31 


116 00 


20 


96 


27 


160 00 


25 


95 


28 


160 00 


14 


96 


27 


160 00 


15 


96127 


160 00 


15 


96 


27 


160 00 


14 


96 


27 


160 00 


18 


94 


30 


160 00 


18 


94 


30 


163 97 


18 


94 


30 


160 00 


18 


94 


30 


163 59 


24 


100 


36 


160 00 



Name of Lessee, 



Date of 
Lease. 





«2 






3 > 


1 









a 


< 




$ 86 40 


114 ; 


86 40 


14' 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14: 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 J 


28 80 


14 r 


28 80 


14. 


28 80 


14 1 


28 80 


14 



327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 

347 sw qr . 

348 nw qr 

349 se qr 

350 sw qr 

351 sw qr 

352 se qr 

353 se qr 



ne qr. 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 
se qr . 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
sw qr 
ne qr. 
se qr . 
sw qr 
sw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
sw qr 
qr. 



se 



354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 



sw qr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr . 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
sw qr . 
ne qr. 
aw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr . 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
se qr . 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
mv . . 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
nw qr 



I 360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 L, 
360 00' 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
400 00 
400 00 
480 00 



Jos. Quigley 

V. Quigley 

Nat. Quigly 

C. Mitchell 

John Fitzgerrald. 
Richard Flagg . . . 

' H. Felt 

J. A. Anten 

Mary Flagg 

A. B. McChesney 
R. Hutchinson . . . 
J. Hutchinson . . . 

W. Corey 

Wells Corey 

H. Daniels 

Geo. K. Hopkins. 
Ed. M. Hopkins. . 
John Hopkins . . . 



May 



J. G. Schaeffer. 
Geo. Barry 
Wm. A. Blair . . 
J. W. Blair. . . . 
W. Guernsey. . . 
Mrs. F. Leggett 
A. P. Knuteson 
S. R. Blatchley. 



June 14. 



June 



400 00|E. O. Hovey 



400 00 
400 00 
381 65 
400 00 
387 50 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 
360 00 



M. E. Bassett 

W. S. Schemer horn, 
J. A. Schemerhorn. 

A. C. King 

Mary E. King 

M. Anis 

D. Milliiran 

J. W. Ki^ng 

Alpheus King 

M. Whitford 

J. L. Campbell 

Wm. C. White 

H. W. Hovey 

Abraham Booth 

P. H. McGrew 

Kate McGrew 



460 00| George W. Pierce 



360 oO 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
368 93 
360 00 
368 08 
360 00 



John Ray. 
J. D. Weaver . 
Ella O. Brown, 
E. Houghton . . 



L. E. Houghton 

L. L. DeMary 

C. W. Leverett 

W. Leverett 

Warren Leverett. . . 

Wm. Leverett 

W. C. Quigley 



June 14. 



June 22. 
June 29. 



July 2. 



115 20 


14 1 


115 20 


141 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14. 


86 40 


14 


115 20 


14: 


115 20 


14 : 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


128 00 


14 


153 60 


14. 


128 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


122 12 


14 


128 00 


14'. 


124 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


128 00 


14 


96 00 


14 


96 00 


14 


128 00 


14 i 


128 00 


14; 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


14 : 


115 20 


14 


211 20 


14 ■ 


115 20 


14 . 


115 20 


14: 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 




115 20 


14 i 

14 ' 


115 20 


118 04 


14 : 


115 20 


14 


117 80 


14 


86 40 


14 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



81 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Conthtued. 



Lease 


Sec. 


d 
QQ 


.Br 




Acres 


valua- 










cu 






o 
6 


o 


Q 
O 


own 


fcJD 

a 

03 


®. 

o 


—1 ^ 
^ 2 
















382 


SW qr. 


13 


100 


36 


160 00 


t .^fiO 00 


383 


aw qr 


4 


95 


31 


184 89 


416 00 


384 


ne qr . 


4 


95 


81 


186 19 


418 93 


385 


se qr. . 


4 


95 


31 


160 00 


3fi0 00 

0\J V/ \J\J 


386 Is w qr. 


4 


95 


31 


160 00 


QRf) (If) 


387 |sw qr. 


26 


98 


28 


160 00 


3fi0 00 


388 ;se qr.. 


27 


98 


28 


160 00 


QfiO 00 

0\J\J w 


389 nw qr 


26 


98 


28 


160 00 


3fi0 00 


390|ne qr. 


27 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


391 


ae qr. 


19 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


392 1 11 w qr 


20 


97 


29 


160 00 


3fi0 00 


393 


se qr.. 


36 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


3941 sw qr. 


36 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


395 


aw qr 


34 


97 


50 


160 00 


360 00 


396 ue qr. 


34 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


397 


ne qr. 


14 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


398 law qr 


14 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


399 se qr.. 


14 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


A.00 


aw qr. 


14 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 




sw qr. 


22 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 




ne qr . 


23 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 ©0 




nw qr 


23 


96 31 


160 00 


360 00 


404 


se qr. . 


23 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


405 


sw qr. 


23 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


406 


se qr. . 


32 


96 


31 


160 00 


36(> 00 


407 


ne qr. 


32 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


408 


se qr. . 


27 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


409 


sw qr. 


27 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


410 


se qr. . 


34 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


411 


nw qr 


35 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


412 


ne qr 


22 


84 


29 


160 00 


560 00 

\J\J 


413 


ae qr. 


29 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 

W-'Vj \J\J 


414 


aw qr 


29 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 

\J\J 


415 


se qr. . 


29 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 

%J^\j \J\J 


416 


sw qr. 


29 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 

0^\J \J\J 


417 


ae qr . 


27 


97 


30 


160 00 


qfin OO 


418 


nw qr 


27 


97 


30 


160 on 


qfin on 


419 


ue qr. 


28 


97 


30 


160 Oft 




420 


se qr. . 


28 


97 


30 


160 on 


^60 On 


421 


ne qr. 


6 


98 


36 


160 00 


QfiO 00 


422 


nw qr 


6 


98 


36 


136 ft7 


^07 Qft 


423 


sw qr. 


5 


98 


36 


160 00 


q60 OO 


424 


nw qr 


8 


98 


36 


160 on 


Qfin nn 


425 


se qr. . 


3 


96 


30 


160 00 


36o 00 


426 


sw qr. 


3 


96 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


427 


sw qr. 


14 
14 


93 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


428 


ae qr. 


94 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


429 


nw qr 


14 


94 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


430 


ae qr. 


10 


95 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


431 


se qr. . 


10 


95 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


432 


ae qr. 


34 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


433 


aw qr 


34 


98 


28 


160 00 


260 00 


434 


ne qr. 


24 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


435 


uw qr 


24 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


436 


sw qr. 


20 


96 


33 


160 00 


360 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Chas. Lea, Jr 

J. Murphy 

T. Murphy 

R. R. >lurphy . . . 

J. Willis 

VI. J. Lee 

P. W. GuernsQy, 

E. J. Guernsey. . . 

F. O. Guernsey . . 

J. Newman 

S. T., Newman. ., 

G. D. Sidway 

E. Sidway 

M. E. Place 

J. J.^ W. Place . . . 

J. C. Price 

J. Price 

E. H. Goulding... 

E. P. Goulding.. , 

F. Hewit 

A. F. Rogers 

E. Rogers 

E. Rogers 

J. Bortwick , 

J. Balkley .... 

H. E. Bulkley.... 
P. Reibsammon.. , 

John Quick 

J. Stanley , 

Thos. Hall 

M. Renter 

A. M. Topping. . . 

B. F. Winscott... 

J. P. Nisbett 

W. Liem 

./. E. Liem 

C. Paddock 

T. Nisbett 

iM. F. Topping.. . 

L. Paddock 

J. Patterson 

J. Hartman 

C. G. Vaughn. . . , 

J. S. Topping 

B. F. Child 

J. Mitchell 

O. Paddock 

G. Paddock 

E. Hollister 

M. E. Hollister.. , 
O. L. Choutran. . , 

John Dow 

T. Dunford 

E. Dunford 

A. Dunford 



July 2. 



.12. 



.16. 



.18. 



.20. 



.Vmount re- 
ceived 


lEntr'nce Fee 


f cfo 40 


$14 


133 12 


14 


134 04 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-f A 

14 


115 20 


-t A 

14 


57 60 


■1 A 

14 


57 bO 


-i A 

14 


57 bO 


■i A 

14 


57 bO 


■i A 

14 


t -1 K OA 
115 Z\) 


■i A 
14 


115 W 


■1 A 

14 


£JA 

57 bO 


14 


5< bU 


-1 A 

14 


Klf CA 

57 bO 


■1 A 

14 


■1 1 K OA 

115 /SO 


-1 A 

14 


■i -t K OA 

115 aO 


i A 

14 


■t -t K OA 

115 loO 


i A 
14 


■1 -i K OA 

115 /sO 


-< A 
14 


^ 1 sr OA 
115 W 


i A 
14 


i 1 K OA 
115 /iO 


i A 
14 


^ 1 sr OA 

llo 


■i A 
14 


i i Pr OA 

115 /sO 


i A 
14 


115 20 


-t A 

14 


■1 -t K OA 

115 550 


■i A 

14 


57 60 


■1 A 

14 


57 60 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-4 A 

14 


115 20 


H A 

14 


115 20 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-i A 

14 


179 20 


-4 A 

14 


115 20 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-i A 

14 


115 20 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-t A 

14 


115 20 


■i A 

14 


115 20 


-< A 

14 


115 20 


■1 A 

14 


^ i (T OA 
115 JiO 


i A 
14 


115 20 


-i A 

14 


Oft KR 




115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 



11 



82 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



[No. 16 



No of Sec. 


Township. 


P5 


No. of Acres. 


Total valua- 
tion. 


8 


98 36 


160 00 


$360 00 


28 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


28 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


29 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


29 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


25 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


25 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


28 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


28 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


28 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


2 


95 


32 


186 25 


419 06 


21 


95 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


21 


95 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


11 


96 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


15 


96 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


83 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


33 


98 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


23 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


23 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


23 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


22 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


21 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


22 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


22 


96 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


10 


100i35 


160 00 


360 00 


36 


98 34 


160 00 


360 00 


24 


98 34 


160 00 


360 00 


1 


99 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


12 


99128 


160 00 


360 00 


12 


100135 


118 73 


267 14 


27 


96 


36 


160 00 


360 00 


27 


96136 


160 00 


360 00 


12 


100135 


118 21 


265 97 


22 


96 31 


160 00 


360 00 


22 


96131 


160 00 


360 00 


20 


97i29 


100 00 


360 00 


30 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


32 


90 '31 


160 00 


600 00 


29 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


29 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


OQ 


96136 


1 fin OA 




27 


96 


36 


160 00 


360 00 


23 


96136 


160 00 


360 00 


27 


96! 36 


160 00 


360 00 


22 


97 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


21 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


32 


97 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


32 


97 30 


160 00 


360 00 


13 


95|27 


160 00 


480 00 


13 


95 1 


27 


160 00 


480 00 


13 


96127 


160 00 


360 00 


13 


96 


27 


160 00 


360 00 


15 


97130 


160 00 


360 00 


12 


100135 


160 00 


360 00 


12 


100135 


160 00 


360 00 



Names of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 













o 








s 

d 






|115 20 


$14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


57 60 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


100 56 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


57 60 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


-t A 

14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 22 


14 


85 48 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


85 11 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


144 00 


14 


86 40 


14 


115 20 


14 


57 60 


14 


57 60 


14 


57 60 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


i 4 
14 


115 20 


14 


153 60 


14 


153 60 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


28 80 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 



isw qr., 
nw qr 
sw qr., 
ne qr . , 
se qr. , 
nw qr, 
sw qr., 
nw qr, 
sw qr., 
se qr . , 
ne qr . 
ne qr. 
se qr . , 
sw qr. 
ne qr . 
ne qr. , 
nw qr, 
ne qr . , 
aw qr, 
se qr . . , 
sw qr , 
se qr. . , 
nw qr, 
sw qr . , 
sw qr.. 
ne qr. , 
463 jse qr.. , 
464 1 se qr.. , 

465 ne qr. . 

466 ne qr. , 

467 sw qr. . 
468jse qr. . 
469 nw qr . 
470|ne qr. . 

se qr. . 
se qr . . 
ne qr. . 
nw qr . 
nw qr . 
sw qr.. 
se qr. . 
lie qr. . 
nw qr . 
nw qr . 
lie qr. . 
sw qr.. 
sw qr.. 
se qr.. 
ne qr. . 
nw qr. 
ne qr. . 
:!W qr. 
se qr . . 
sc qr . . 
sw qr.. 



E. A. Dunford. . . . 

A. D. Bnll 

E. E. Bull 

H. B. Bull 

E. E. Bull 

W. R. Adams .... 

E. R. Adams 

W. C. Pierce .... 

E. S. Pierce 

W. B. Pierce 

C. E. Pierce 

T. Otre^ 

W. Otrey 

J. Atwood 

E. Atwood 

C. L Lee 

W. Quigley 

W. T. Rowan .... 

M. I. Rowan 

G. Davis 

W. Carnoby 

S. J. Carnoby 

G. L. Reed 

M. Reed 

W. Thomas 

C. Thomas 

T. S. Duuford. . . . 

H. Duiiford 

G. Lrwis 

L Thomas 

R. James 

R. J. James 

P. James 

J. McKenna 

A. McKenna 

G. H. Davis 

B. L. Bruner 

A. Haner 

J. Bartou 

G. R. Ferguson . . 

G. James , 

J. Jan\es , 

E. Mitchell 

D. V. Brooks 

E. Clement 

C. B. Avis 

A. Warren 

V. Warren 

R. E. Pattison 

E. W. Patt ison 

P. B. Whipple 

II. G. AVhippl.".... 

C. Holden, Jr 

M. E. Hanson 

N. E. Hanson 



July 20 



."..21 



July 21 
... "..31 



Aug. 1 



.8 



10 



\.18 



,". .20 
,"..24 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



83 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



493 
493 
484 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
545 
546 



ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
w hf se q 
ne qr . . . 
se qr . . . 
ne qr. . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr. . . 
elifneqr 
nw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
se qr . . . 
ne qr. . . 
se qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
nw qr. . 
se qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
sw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
se qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr. . 
se qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
ne qr. . . 
nw qr.. 
ne qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr . . . 
ne qr . . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr . . 
sw qr . . 
nw qr.. 



03 

> . 

^ 2 



29 
29 
29 
29 
85 29 



98 



96 
96 
94 
94 32 



94 
94 
100 
99 
95 



99128 
99|28 
9928 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

81 65 

174 08 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

175 56 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

147 60 

148 38 
148 65 
148 21 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



$360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
200 00 
200 00 
360 00 
180 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
183 71 
391 66 



640 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
420 00 
420 00 
420 00 
420 00 
420 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
395 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 

332 10 

333 85 

334 46 
333 47 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



Names of Lessees. 



Date of 
Lease. 



S. F. Conner 

S. A. Conner 

H. J. Jennison 

G. A Hanson 

J. H. Sedgwick . . . 

L. Washburn 

L. Olson 

N. Cliarlson 

L. Mathews 

H. S. Mathews 

H. C. G. Moritz . . . 

E. Duffner 

L. Jaryenson 

K. Hanson 

O. Bendickson 

360 00 H. Hulverson 

360 00 T. Hanson 

400 00 G. Taylor 

400 00 P. McCulloch 

360 00 A. G. Studor 

J. W. Duncan 

O. Oleson 

K. Ganderson 

M. Hobson 

J. Hobson 

C. R. Hobson 

A. M. Hobson 

L. Cooper 

E. M. Cooper 

M. Cooper , 

A. A. Cooper 

S. McKnight 

J. W. Duncan , 

A. Duncan 

W. H. Wineman 

A. H. Wineman 

N. T. Wineman 

J. N. Williams 

R. A. Williams 

L. Mason 

S. Mason , 

N. Hutton , 

S. Barnes , 

B. F. Hutton , 

L. Hutton , 

J. M. Stout , 

J. W. Stout 

J. M. Snyder , 

N. B. Snyder 

F. M. Vaneil 

G. L. Organ 

W. R. Organ 

S. Organ 

S. Organ 

B. Organ 



Aug. 24 



...."..28 



Sept. 3 
...."..15 



Oct. 



Bee. 



...."..13 
...."..24 

Nov. 10 



"..26 



[Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entra'ce fee. 


ti 1 5 on 




115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


16 00 


14 


16 00 


14 


115 20 


14 


57 60 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 

XTb 


115 20 


14 

x^ 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 

Xtc 


58 80 


14 


125 32 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 

Xt* 


32 00 


14 

Xrfc 


32 00 


14 


115 20 


14 

X*! 


204 80 


14 


115 20 


14 
xt 


115 20 


14 
xt 


115 20 


14 

X'* 


115 20 


14 

Xrt 




14 


115 20 


14 




14 


10ft 8ft; 


14 


100 8ft. 


14 

XTt 


1 0ft 80= 


14 

Xrfc 


134 40 


14 

Xrfc 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 
xrt 


28 80 


14 
x^ 


28 80 


14 

XTt 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 
xt 


.^1 fiO 


14 
x^ 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


26 56 


14 


26 70 


14 


53 50 


14 


26 67 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


88 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 



84 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT.— Continued. 



Name of Lesee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entrance fee 


5 28 80 


$14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


199 36 


14 


28 80 


14 


100 80 


14 


100 80 


14 


33 60 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


31 12 


14 


28 8t.> 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


38 40 


14 


38 40 


14 


48 00 


14 


49 60 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


48 00 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 



547 
548 
549 
550 
551 
552 
553 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
561 



ne qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr. 
se qr.. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr. 
562ise qr.. 
5631 sw qr. 
564jnw qr. 
565 sw qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr.. 
nw qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr.. 
ne qr. 
se qr.. 
ne qr.. 
ne qr. 
se pr.. 
se qr . . 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
sw qr 
ne qr. 
sw qr . 
se qr . 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
ne qr. 



566 
567 
568 
569 
570 
571 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
579 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
.586 
.587 



588 
589 
590 
591 
592 
593 
594 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 



nw qr. 
se qr. . 
sw qr . 
ne qr. 
nw qr, 
se qr. . 
ne qr., 
nw qr. 
se qr. . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr. 
se qr. . 
ne qr. 



34 
34 
34 
|26 
31 
31 
30 
19 
19 
17 
8 
17 
21 
21 
36 
30 
17 
17 
20 
34 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
36 
36 
36 
35 
25 
25 
25 
26 
26 
26 
27 



99 
96 
100 



28 
32 
35 
34 
23 
32 
28 
28 
23 
34 
34 
34 
34 
31 
96 31 
96 31 
96 31 
95 
95 
90 
90 
90 
90 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 
96 



36 
24 
24 
24 
24 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
96 31 



97127 
9727 



160 00 
160 00 
115 95 
160 00 
166 13 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00' 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
172 91 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
165 33 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
100 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



360 00 
360 00 
260 89 
360 00 
623 00 
360 00 
420 00 
420 00 
420 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



H. Organ 

M. L. Gibson. . 

S. Baker 

M. Dewis 

C. J. Dewis. . . 
M.M. Dewis. , 

T. Duncan 

E. N. Duncan, 

M. Duncan 

L. Mason 

G. Hutton.. . , 
E. Barnes 



Dec. 



360 00 W. Dewit. 



360 00 N. P. Heath.... 

360 00 C. Heath 

360 00 J. E. Buruet... 
360 00 W. L. Burnet. . 
389 05 Dr. J. L. White. 

360 00 H. White 

600 00 J. O. Hamilton. 
600 00 1 M. Hamilton... . 
600 00 O. B. Hamilton. 

600 00 G. 8. Miles 

360 OOjA. T. Bitz 

360 00|P. Seibold 

360 00 W. Gerhardt... 



360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
480 00 
600 00 
620 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
300 00 
360 00 
860 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



N. Seibold 

M. Seller 

C. H. Foote 

L. M. Cutting. . . 
A. H. Cutting. . . 

M. B. Miner 

L. J. Miner 

J. S.Malot 

F. Osborn 

M. Osborn 

C. M. Hamilton.. 
M. C. Hamilton.. 

D. T. Bonnell... 

G. W. Parent.... 

J. F. Smith 

N. Beaty 

A. Beaty 

F. H. Spencer.. . 

D. E. Beaty 

N. K. Beardslee. 
J. M. West 

E. S. Beardslee.. 

J. Vandike 

0. H. Vandike . . 

J. K. Smith 

C. Corzine 

W. Embly 

P. C Walker. . . . 
E. L. Birsley 



Dec. 
Dec. 



No. 16.1, 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
REPORT OP LAND AGENT— Continued. 



85 



No. of Lease 


Pts. of Sec. 


o 
QQ 

O 


Township. 


Range. 


No. of acres. 


Total Valua- 
tion. 


602 


se qr. . . 


27 


97 


27 


160 00 


$ 360 00 


603 


se qr . . . . 


23 


97 


27 


160 00 


360 00 


604 


sw qr. . . 


23 


97 


27 


160 00 


360 00 


605 


sw qr. . . 


24 


90 


24 


160 00 


600 00 


606 


lie qr . . . 


36 


96 


32 


160 00 


360 00 


607 


sw qr. . . 


22 


91 


37 


160 00 


600 00 


608 


nw qr. . 


Oft 


90 


24 


160 00 


600 00 


609 


ne qr' . . 


26 


90 


24 


160 00 


600 00 


610 


ne qr. . . 


32 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


611 


nw qr. . 


32 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


612 


se qr. . . 


32 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


613 


sw qr. . . 


32 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


614 


nw qr. . 


36 


95 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


615 


ne qr . . . 


36 


95 


31 


160 00 


360 00 


616 


se qr . , . 


22 


98 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


617 


nw qr . . 


8 


95 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


618 


nw qr. . 


32 


90 


32 


160 00 


600 00 


619 


sw qr. . . 


32 


90132 


160 00 


600 00 


620 


sw qr. . . 


28 


90132 


160 00 


600 00 


621 


se qr. . . 


28 


90 


32 


160 00 


600 00 


622 


sw qr. . . 


24 


94 


28 


160 00 


360 00 


623 


ne qr. . , 


25 


94 


28 


160 00 


480 00 


624 


se qr. . . 


25 


94 


28 


16o 00 


480 00 


625 


nw qr. . 


26 


94 


28 


160 00 


480 00 


626 


se qr. . . 


26 


90 


24 


160 00 


600 00 


627 


ne qr . . . 


34 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


628 


ne qr . . . 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


629 


nw qr. . 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


630 


se qr. . . 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


631 


sw qr. . 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


632 


sw qr. . . 


36 


100 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


633 


se qr . . . 


8 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


634 


ne qr, . . 


8 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


635 


nw qr . . 


8 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


636 


sw qr . . . 


8 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


637 


ne qr. , . 


26 


91 


37 


160 00 


600 00 


638 


nw qr . . 


33 


98 


29 


160 00 


360 00 


639 


sw qr . . . 


26 


90 


32 


160 00 


600 00 


640 


ne qr . . . 


4 


94 


32 


160 00 


360 00 


641 


sw qr, . . 


4 


94 


32 


160 00 


360 00 


642 


ne qr. . . 


8 


94 


32 


160 00 


360 00 


643 


se qr 


4 


99 


34 


160 00 


360 00 


644 


se qr 


22 


98 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


645 


nw qt.. 


26 


98 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


646 


swqr. . . 


26 


98 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


647 


se qr . . . 


26 


94 


28 


160 00 


600 00 


648 


nw qr. . 


36 


94 


28 


160 00 


600 00 


649 


se qr. . . 


2 


94 


28 


160 00 


600 00 


650 


sw qr... 


2 


94 


28 


160 00 


600 00 


651 


nw qr . . 


36 


95 


28 


160 00 


420 00 


652 


ne qr. . . 


18 


97 


33 


160 00 


360 00 


653 


nw qr.. 


20 


98 


30 


160 00 


360 00 


654 


ne qr. . . 


20 


98 


30 


16o 00 


360 00 


655 


se qr. . . 


36 


85 


31 


160 00 


200 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Amount r 
ceived. 


Entrance fee 


$ 28 801114 


28 80 


14 


9S SO 


14 




14 




14 


4S 00 


14 
11 




14 
14 


4.R 00 


14 
14 


28 80 


14 
14 


11 9.0 


14 
14 


8fi 40 

OU '±\J 


14 
14 


86 40 


14 

14 


^1 fiO 


14 
14 


57 RO 


14 
14 


86 40 


14 

14 


86 40 


14 

14 


4S 00 

rtO \J\J 


14 
14 


48 00 


14 
14 


4-S 00 


14 
14 


48 00 


14 
14 


9R 80 


14 
14 


38 40 


14 
L4 


QG AO 


14 
14 


38 40 


14 
14 


4S 00 


14 
14 


9S SO 


14 
14 


28 80 


14 
14 


9,9, SO 
/CO ou 


1 4 
14 


28 80 


14 
14 


9,S so 

/ilO OU 


14 
14 


9S SO 
i*o ou 


14 
14 


Sfi 40 

ou '±U 


14 
14 


86 40 


14 
14 


86 40 


14 
14 


86 40 


14 

14 


14.4. 00 

Itt uu 


14 
14 


28 80 


14 

14 


48 00 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


115 20 


14 


28 80 


14 


115 20 


14 


115 20 


14 


48 20 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


4 ^ 00 


14 


33 60 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 8G 


14 


28 80 


14 


48 00 


14 



Dec. 



C .Mulford 

J. L. Spencer 

G. R. Swallow 

G. W. Ware 

A. C. Hamilton 

C. W. D. Hamilton. 
W. H. Anderson . . . 
S. W. Davis 

B. Trabue 

A. O. Trabue 

G. R. Garretson 

B. Garrettson 

A. Moffitt 

C. W. Moffitt 

J. Bates*&A. Seym'r 

1867. 

J. F. Kinmonth Jan. 

H. Law 

Harriet Law . . . 

J. Law 

J. W. Trabue... 
E. Trabue 

B. Shults 

C. Shults 

S. Shults 

S. Parker 

A. J. Smalley. . . 

D. F. Evans .... 
J.H. Smalley... 
M. Olmstead. . . . 
S. S. Olmstead. . 

M. O. Brien 

M. W. Seaman. . 

E. P. Cutler 

E. B. Meatyard . 
J. A. Meatyard . 

D. Flint 

'T. Hay 

C. Roscialouski. . 

F. Trabue 

Trabue 

A. C. Roferty. . . 
W. T. Spencer. . 

B. Kesler 

J. Kesler 

B.E. Morse 

G. Shults 

J. Fisher 

G. Merriweather 

A. Preston 

J. Leaton 

J. F. Gish .... 

J. Wise 

W. T Cooper... 
F. Hewis 



19 



27 



17 



Dec 27 '66 
Jan 17 '67 



21 



Feb. 2 



86 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



c3 

c3 O 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



656 
657 
658 
659 
660 
661 
662 
663 
664 
665 
666 
667 
668 
669 
670 
671 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 
678 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 
688 
689 



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690 1 nw qr 
691 
692 
693 
694 
695 
696 
697 
698 
699 
700 
701 
702 
703 
704 
705 
706 
707 
708 
709 
730 



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98 

98 

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92 

92 

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98 

96 

91 

91 

98 

98 

90 33 
100 
100 
100 

98 

98 

97 

99 

89 

89 

99 



99 
99 
98 
98 
99 
99 
99128 



171 47 

164 16 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
169 62 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
112 39 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

165 12 
165 59 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
100 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



385 81 
369 36 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 W 
600 00 
636 07 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
252 88 
360 00 
360 00 
36 00 
420 00 
360 00 
360 oO 
840 00 
840 00 
360 00 



C. Prindle 

M. Quitchell . . . . 
M. Cooper 

D. Davis 

J. L'lforce 

E. McCarty 

H. M. Gilmore . . 

J. F. Chase 

L. A. Reynolds . 
T. S. Mathers. . . 
O. H. Forker . . . 
J. W. Vinson . . . 
D. L. Rieves 

G. Parmeter . . . . 

D. E. Petteiigill. 
C. Petteugill . . . 

H. H. Beach 

E. Beach 

G. M. Raymond . 
W. A. Stoddard . 
O. C. Sullans. . . 

fl. Pogue... 



W. King 

C. King 

W. S. King . . . 

J. P. Camp 

M. L. Leggett. . 
L. H. Leggett. . 
T. H. Barnett. . 

A. Leak 

C. Parmentcr. . 

T. Smirl 

M. Landon 

T. Foster 

H. M. Foster . . 
H. O. Goodrich 



360 00 
360 00 
360 00 

371 52 

372 57 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
3()0 00 
3(50 00 
3()0 00 
3(50 00 
360 00 
360 00 



J. A. Goodrich 

M. L. Vins(Hi 

^ '. H. Knap 

FL Nevins 

A. Starkweather . 

E. IT. Smith 

J. W. Sutherland. 

W. Douglass 

R. S. Cole 

M. N. Cole 

C. W. Cole 

E. A. Col" 

R. S. Cole, Jr. . . . 

David Kirby 

E: Kirby . 

J. Kirby 

N. M. Brown 

R. F. Cl:irk 



Feb. 2. 



March 
' 15 ' 



April 2. 



No. 16.1 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. §7 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



711 
712 
718 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 
727 
729 
730 
781 
782 
733 
734 
735 
736 
737 
738 
789 
740 
741 
742 
743 
744 
745 
746 



nw qr 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
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nw qr 
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aw qr 
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sw qr. 
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ne qr. 
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sw qr. 
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sw qr. 
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749 jnw qr 
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747 
748 



751 
752 
753 
754 
755 
756 
757 
758 
759 
760 
761 
762 
768 
764 



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qr.. 
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88 



98 
100 
100 
95 
95 
95 
95 
98 
98 
97 
98 
97 
97 
97 
97 
98 
98 
98 
98 
98 
97 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



140 61 
160 00 

140 95 
160 00 

141 75 
160 00 
141 00 
160 00 
153 00 
160 00 
160 Oo 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
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120 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00| 



480 00 E. W 

423 09 
480 00 

424 05 
480 00 
575 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



421 00 J. F. Williams.. 
480 00 Williams.... 
428 87 L. R. Williams. 

Page.... 

A. M. Page 

E. J. Manning.. 
VI. iS. Williams. 

L. Granby 

W. L. Howard.. 
William Ball. . . 

C. Davis 

E. B. Park 

J. B. Robinson. 
L. (\ Robinson. 

360 00 1 S. Kafka 

860 00 Sarah Kafka. .. 
860 OOlL. Whitney. . . , 
360 00 A. B Whi.ney. 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 
360 00 
360 00 
271 80 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
860 00 
360 00 
860 00 
860 00 



F. L. Whitney 

E. Whitney. . . 
C). Reibsaman. 
John Kell.... 

D. Kell 

I. War nick 

G. Warnick. . . 

F. Hajaman. . . 

H. Hajaman 

J. Smith 

C. Henick 

F. Henick 

T. C. McCorkle 

S. Mc^'orkle 

S. y. Grossman 

L. D. Corey 

R. Newton 

Rue 

Rue 

E. Henderson . . . 

Kinsley - 

A. Henderson. . . 

Henderson 

M. West 

A. Picket 

Daniels 

Starkweather 

Challacombe 

Challacombe 



April 8 



..14 



April 9 



,30 



J. R. Challacombe 
J. L'. Challacombe, jr 

J. Oowe 

J. Quartou 

J . Lock 

L Lock 

360 001 J. Bruner 

360 00 W. C. Stryker 



May 



May 18 



June 





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FH 




O 




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$ 67 48 


$14 


76 80 


14 


67 56 


14 


76 80 


14 


67 68 


14 


76 80 


14 


67 84 


14 


76 80 


14 


138 09 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


65 22 


14 


88 40 


14 


88 40 


14 


38 40 


14 


88 401 14 


86 40 


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86 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


28 80 


14 


86 40 


14 



88 



AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 




76(5 se qr.... 
767 sw qr. .. 
768|ae qr. .. 
7691 ne qr... 

770 1 se qr 

771 Isw qr. ., 
7721 se qr... 



773 
774 
775 
776 
777 



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sw qr. . . 
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nw qr . . 
778jsw qr . . 
779 ehf seqr 

se qr 

se qr, 



780 
781 



782|sw qr... 
783 
784 
785 
786 
787 
788 
789 
790 
791 
792 
793 
794 
795 
796 
797 
798 
799 
800 
801 
802 
803 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
811 
812 
813 



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se qr 

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810 
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160 00 
160 00 
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159 75 
80 00 

160 00 
160 00 
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160 00 
160 00 
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164 32 
166 84 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 00 
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160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
149 34 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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79 25 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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1360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
385 81 
480 00 
840 00 
360 00 
420 00 
200 00 
360 00 

359 44 
180 00 

360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
840 00 
480 00 
493 56 
500 52 
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360 00 
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420 00 
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360 00 
360 00 
300 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
300 00 
178 31 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Kate Stryker 

Mary Stryker 

J. V. Stryker 

A. Y. Trogden 

M. Trogden 

E. Twitchell 

J. Cooper '. . . 

J. G. Boulter 

B. Godfrey 

C. W. Brown 

W. D. Perrin 

L Trabue 

M. Trabue 

T. Olson 

J. H. Tealien 

W. Mathews 

N. Mathews 

T. Haywood 

N. R. Taylor 

C. Taylor 

J. B. Taylor 

L. C. Taylor 

W. C. Merrill 

H. A. Merrill 

L. Hewit. 

F. P. Henderson . . 
W. C. Everingrew 

W. Earley , 

F. Krais 



June 



R. E. Godfrey... 
J. J. Sunibali . . . 

H. Sumball 

Jas. Treloar 

.J 110. Treloar 

W. Edcboff, Jr.. 

E. Eii'lehoff 

W. li. Prickett. . 
V. F. Prickett... 
N. A. Prickett.. . 

J.A.Wert 

J. G. Barnsback. 
H. C. Barnsback. 
E. M. Prickett. . . 
C. A. Wert 

C. F. Peal 

M. J. Wert 

J. G. Robinson . . 
J. Bozzo 

E. Bozzo 

W. Bender 

D. Gillespie 

S. E. Barnsback. 
J. A. Barnsback. 
L. J. Bariisbiick . 

F. Barnsback 



Date of 
Lease. 



,"..10 



June 10 
.."..11 



13 



,"..22 



.26 



July 2 



,"..12 



."..20 



,22 



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115 20 


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67 20 


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28 80 


14 


33 60 


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48 00 


14 


28 80 
86 25 


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43 20 


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14 
14 


28 80 


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86 30 


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67 20 


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76 80 


14 


78 96 


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94 08 


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100 80 


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86 40 


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86 40 


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57 60 


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57 60 


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57 60 


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57 60 


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57 60 


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57 60 


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57 60 


14 


57 60 


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57 60 


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86 40 


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86 40 


14 


86 40 


14 


42 78 


14 


86 40 


14 


144 00 


14 


144 00 


14 


144 00 


14 


144 00 


14 



No. 16.J AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



89 



O 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entrance fee. 


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24 
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95 
96 
90 
89 
92 
92 



31 
33 
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49 
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46 



33 
33 
32 
32 
32 
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42 
42 
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31 
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161 29 
160 00 

174 12 
160 17 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 60 
153 31 
152 33 
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175 65 
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1362 90 
360 00 
652 95 
846 14 
480 00 
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343 95 
342 74 
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349 92 
360 00 
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360 00 
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354 98 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
333 54 



T. J. Barnsback. . . 
iVT. E. Robinson . . . 
Terry & Garber. . . 
Terry & Garber. . . 

J. S. Trares 

J. Trares 

N. T. Wart 

E. J. Prickett 

W. M. T. Springer. 
L. C. Springer .... 

S. S. Gillum 

J. M. Gillum 

N. P. Gillum 

J. G. Leonard 

A. A. Leonard 

C. E. Clark 

J. B. McMichard . . 

C. H. Spilman 

S. O. Bonner 

M. Minock 

T. Deatz 

A. Atkins 

J. Atkins 

H. Atkins 

D. Atkins 

T. Judy 

D. Judy 

T.J.Judy 

A. S. Judy 

M. Judy 

E. A. Love 

W. E.Nix 

W. H. Nix 

J. McKee 



July 22 
August 7 



327 51 July McKee 



360 00 
360 00 

325 23 

326 77 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
387 16 
658 69 
600 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



C. McKee 
N. H. McKee . . . 

J. B. McKee 

H. F. McKee... 

F. A. McKee.... 
H. J. McKee.... 
T. J. Neusham . . 
T. W. Twitchell. 
S. B. Gilham.... 

J. A. Gilham 

H. Gilham 

L. O. Gilham . . . 

G. J. Gilham . . . 
L. H. Gilham . . . 
C. P. Sebastian . 
O, Sebastian . . . . 

J. Kolb 

L. Kolb 

J. Derbert 

E Derbert 



Sept. 



,12 



.23 



,10 



90 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



876 se qr 



877 
878 
879 



881 
882 
883 
884 
885 



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94 37 
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87 40 
90 45 

88 41 
88 41 
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160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
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160 20 
160 20 

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161 40 
161 80 
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159 90 

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164 09 
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160 00 
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360 00|Y. May 

360 OOIJ. Newdecker. . 
360 00 0. Newdecker. . 
360 00 1 P. iN'ewdecker. . 
360 00 IG. Newdecker. 
360 45 1 J. C. Thurman. 
360 OOjK. Thnrmau ... 

363 15 F, O. Thurman 

364 05 J. Ellison 

360 00 F. W, Stalliuau 
360 00 E. Newdecker . 
360 00 F. Wentz 



360 00 



360 00 B. Keelt. 



360 00 



W. Weatz 



H. F. Wood. 



360 00 J. Speis 

360 00 ' \ Speis 

360 00jG. Volk 

360 00 1 L. Wentz 

360 00 J. Spies, Jr 

359 77 L. Spies 

360 00 C. Pflirter 

360 00 G. Gravins 

360 00 Geo. S. Pence... 
360 00 A. B. Parker . . . 
480 00 t:. D. Pelton.. . . 
480 00 -'\ A. Pelton. ... 
260 80|J. A. Dunaag-an. 
265 70 1 L R. Dunnagan . 
360 00 IT. Black 



360 00 A. ]V[. Black. . 
360 00 H. H. SiniMi . 
360 00 J. A. Wood.. 
360 00 W. J. Wood. . 

360 00 J. Wood 

360 00 .I.F. West... 
360 00 M. Wood .... 



360 00 H. L. Wood... 

360 00 D. Evans 

360 00 T. Evans 

360 00 R. J. Simmons. 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



341 73 
330 93 
360 00 
600 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 



C/. H. Simmons. . 
J. H. Simmons . 
Jas. IL Simmons 
II. H. Smith. . .. 
369 20 N. E. Sebastian . 

360 00 S. T. Mason 

M. V. Mason.... 
P. D. Merwin . . . 

E. Merwin 

J. Blattner 

M. S. C. Blattner 

A. Blattner 

Anna Blattner . . 



Sept. 5. 



Oct. 9. 



10 



11 

30 



N)v. 1. 



13 
14 



21 



600 00 IL Weinheimcr 



; H6 40 |14 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 52 

86 40 

87 15 
87 36 
28 80 
86 40 
28 80 
28 80 
86 40 
86 401 
86 40 
86 40 
57 60 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 

115 20 
115 20 

62 58 

42 50 

28 80 

28 80 

86 40 

57 60 

57 60 

86 40 

86 40 

86 40 

86 40 

86 40 

8() 40 

86 40 

86 40 

86 40 

86 40 

8() 40 

59 06 

28 80 

27 34 
79 41 
8() 40 
48 00 
38 40 

28 80 
28 SO 
48 00 



fo. 16. 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



91 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



S3 > 



931 
932 
933 
934 
935 
936 
937 
938 
939 
940 
941 
942 
943 
944 
945 
946 
947 
948 
949 
950 
951 
952 
953 
954 
955 
956 
957 
958 
959 
960 
961 
962 
963 



964 
965 
966 
967 



lie qr . . 
lie qr.. 
se qr. . . 
ne qr . . 
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aw qr. 
se qr. . . 
sw qr.. 
se qr. . . 
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se qr. . 
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lie qr. . 
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sw qr. 
sw qr. 
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se qr. . 
ne qr . 

972 se qr. . 

973 sw qr. 
se qr. . 
sw qr. 



969 
970 
971 



974 
975 



976 ne qr. 



977 
978 
979 
980 
981 
982 
983 
984 
985 



ne qr . . 
se qr. . . 

nw qr, 
ne qr. , 
se qr. . , 
se qr. . . 
se qr. . , 
sw qr.. 
ne qr. , 



90145 



41 
41 
88 41 



88 41 
88 41 

87 45 

88 43 
90 32 
90 45 
90 45 



86 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 OOi 
41 226 55 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
41 160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
172 92 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 72 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



44 160 00 



160 00 
160 00 

131 32 
160 00 

132 52 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
190 99 
160 00 
160 00 
160 10 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

94 36 160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



94 36 
94 36 



94 36 

93 36 

94 36 
94 36 

40 
94 33. 
98130 
30 



160 15 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
166 37) 



480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
509 74 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
840 00 
840 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
480 00 L, 
480 00 
655 95 
840 00 
600 00 
360 00 

360 00 

361 62 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
492 45 



600 00 
496 95 
600 00 
360 00 
600 00 
238 74 
600 00 
600 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
374 33 



A. M. Weinlieimer . 

E. Weinlieimer 

P. Weinlieimer 

W. Shum 

P. Slium. 

A. Parkison , 

A. A. Parkison 

D. B. Parkinson 

G. W. Parkinson. . , 

A. Bruegger , 

M. Bruegger , 

F Scnn , 

M. Hofer 

J. Buley 

T. Gruaz 

P. C. C;hipron 

E. C. Chipron 

Cliipron , 

C. M'Alilly , 

M. L. M'Allilly 

F. Earnst 

J. Earnst 

M, Earnst 

A. Osthoff 

D. Briner 

J. Wasmer 

J. Wild 

J. Hediger 

G. W. Ballerton. . . 

S. Ballerton 

J. R. Blattner 

A. E. Blattner 

J. Seidler 

T. Blattner 

N. Thalmon 

F. Payer 

W. Metz 

Dan Blattner 

J. Metz 

L. Baer 

C. Kinne 

E. Montgomery. . . 
N. Montgomery. . . 
N. J. Montgomery . 

A. M. Montgomery 
M. M. Montgomery 

B. J. Meiitgomery. 
R. N. Montgomery 
J. Montgomery . . . 
Wm. Montgomery. 
P. E. Montgomery 

A. H. Judd 

E. A. Judd 

C. Thubor 

W. Mayo 



Nov. 21 



Dec. 



. . . . 16 

Nov. 1 



5 38 40 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
40 78 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
67 20 
67 20 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
48 00 
38 40 

38 40 
52 47 
67 20 
48 00 
28 80 
28 80 
28 93 
28 80 
48 00 
48 00 
57 60 
57 60 
48 00 

39 40 
48 00 
39 75 
48 00 
57 60 
48 00 
19 10 
48 00 
48 00 
38 40 
76 80 
76 80 
76 80 
76 80 
76 80 

115 20 
115 20 
115 20 
115 20 
115 20 
144 00 
86 40 
86 40 
89 85 



|14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
l4 
14 
14 
l4 
l4 
14 
14 
14 
l4 
14 

l4 

l4 

If 
l4 

If 

l4 
l4 

l4 
14 
14 

If 
l4 



92 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT-Continued. 



[No. 16. 



986 
987 



993 
993 
994 
995 
996 
997 
998 
999 
1000 
1001 
1002 
1003 
1004 
1005 
1006 
1007 
1008 
1009 
1010 
1011 
1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
1018 
1019 
1020 
1021 
1022 
1023 
1024 
1025 
1026 
1027 
1028 
1029 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1033 
1034 
1035 
1036 
1037 
1038 
1039 
1040 



nw qr. . 
nw qr . . 
ne qr. . , 
nw qr. . 

se qr 

sw qr . . . 
sw qr . . . 
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Oil 

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98130 
99 30 
95133 
95 33 
95133 
95133 



166 93 $375 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
156 77 

163 44 

164 48 
160 00 

178 76 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

179 76 
160 00 
178 08 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

162 60 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
150 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
152 29 
152 39 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

163 01 
160 00 

83 34 
162 50 



360 
360 
360 
360 
360 
600 
587 
367 
370 
360 
536 
360 
360 
360 
360 
360 
600 
480 
480 
360 
404 
360 
400 
480 
480 
480 
480 
480 
487 
360 
360 
600 
840 
480 
480 
360 
456 
457 
360 
360 
600 
360 
360 
360 
360 
480 
480 
480 
360 
366 
360 
187 
365 



Name of Lessee. 



59 E. Mayo 

00 F. Dreses 

00 J. Gehrig 

00 E. Gehrig 

00 A. Gehrig 

00 Jacob Gehrig 

00 H. Blattner 

89 A. Blattner 

74 W. Koernbaum 

08 E. Koernbaum 

00 G. Gouterman 

28 W. Kinder 

00 S. M. Kinder 

00 W. T. Kinder 

00 A. J. Kinder 

00 G. A. Kinder 

00 T. N. Williamson . . 
00 .T. Carney & J. P. Jarvis. 

00 J. Carney, Jr 

00 E. B. Carney 

00 S. Throp 

46 T. A. Throp 

00 M. Throp 

68 R. Williamson 

00 J. F. Jarvis 

00 M. A. Jarvis 

00 S. B. Jarvis 

00 G. W. B. Harringer. 

00 S. J. Harringer 

80 C. Schlechtnig 

00 Andrew Parker 

00 Mary Parker 

00 J. Blattner 

00 L. Apiiel 

OOi.T. R. Miles 

00 E. A. Miles......... 

00 J. W. Ruedy 

87 M. W. Seaman . . . . 

1'7 E. Seaman 

00|A. B. Se: 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
77 
00 
50 
83 



aman 



162 631 365 92 M. Catlin 



J. W. Ayer 

L. Pline 

W. Donoho 

H. P. Donoho 

W. B. Donoho 

W. T. Donoho 

F. A. Sobin 

J. BrtrsDnck, W.W.Jarvie 

J. Howe!! 

R. Kittleson 

R. Catlin 

R. Dart 

T. F. Catlin • 

II. C. Poster 



Date of 
Lease. 



Nov.^ 1 
Dec. * *i2 



."..20 



Nov. 1 
Dec. 31 



Dec. 31 



Jan. 27 



...."..31 

Feb. 15 



Mar. 19 



May^ 10 
.*.'.*.'"!. 19 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Eutrance fee.! 


<|p aJ lO 




OD 




4 ou 


1 J.1 




14.1 

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p»7 fin 


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14 


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14 


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57 00 


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57 60 


14 


57 60 


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76 80 


14 


76 80 


14 


76 80 


14 


57 (50 


14 


58 68 


14 


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14 


30 00 


14 




14 


58 52 


14 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



93 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



1041 sw qr. . . 

slif ne qr 
shfnwqr 
sw qr. . . 
nw qr. . . „^ 
iiwqr sehf 21 
whf sw qr 
nw qr . . . 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease 



+3 



18 



1042 
1043 
1044 
1045 
1046 
1047 



99 23 

100 21 

97 28 



1048 ne qr. 

1049 se qr 

1050 nw qr. . 

1051 ne qr. . . 
1062 se qr.... 

1053 sw qr. . . 

1054 nw qr. . 
1055 jnw qr. . 
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1066 se qr 28 

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1077 se qr.. . . 

1078 ne qr. . . 

1079 ne qr. . . 

1080 se qr..-. 

1081 sw qr, 



1059 
1060 
1061 
1062 
1063 
1064 



22 
22 
22 
22 
26 
4 
30 
2 
2 

35 



1082 sw qr.. 



1083 
1084 
1085 
1086 
1087 
1088 
1089 
1090 
1091 
1092 
1093 
1094 



162 45 



$ 365 51 IE. Marshall May 19 



48 
48 
48 
41 
40 
. „ 40 
96 31 
94 39 
94 39 
94 39 

94 39 

95 31 

94 37 
98 48 

95 30 
95 30 
95 27 
95 27 
95 27 
95 27 
94 37 

94 37 

95 27 
48 
48 
46 
30 



90 




98 30 
98 30 
98 30 
98 30 
98 30 

98 30 

99 30 
99 30 
99 30 

30 
98 30 
93 40 
93 40 
90 47 
95 33 

98 30 

99 33 
99 33 
99 33 
99 33 
95 27 
95 27 
95 27 



196 56 
160 00 
160 00 
40 00 
80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
80 00 
80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
16o 00 
16o 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
150 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
16o 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 09 
160 00 
80 00 
160 00 
168 05 
148 33 
160 90 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



442 26 1 8. Parish 

480 OOlJ. McCornell 

360 00 H. Nelson 

90 00 Ole Nelson 



180 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
180 00 
180 00 
480 00 
480 00 



Ole Nelson 

D. Gilmore 

J. McClurg- 

S. ^. McClurg... 
W. R. Stonhara . 
A. Kneekle 

E. Knaekle 

L. Werner 

Leona Werner. . . 
J. A. Stoneham. 

J. A. Wrong 

J. Paulson 

W. Emerson 

W. Emerson 

M. L. Hite 

L. H. Hite , 



480 00 G. W. Davis. 



480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
840 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
420 00 
360 00 
378 11 
333 74 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 



J. E. 

G. H 
M. B 
J. W 

H. L, 
F. P. 



$ 58 48 



$14 



5$ept. 
May 



June 
July 



Davis 
bmith. . . . 
Smith . . . 
Morse... . 
Dean. . . . 
Dean 

C. 8. HamiUon. 
A. T. Wright.. . 
W. H. Ashby... 
J. Safford 

D. Craw 

H. L. Craw 

J. 8. Morris 

A. P. Twinchan 
M. M. Lawson.. 

A. W. Bell 

J. D. King 

H. 8. Gillum... 

J. Robinson 

D. D. Jones 

D. O. bettlemire. 
8. T. Settlemire 

J. Buchanan 

T. 8chirenburg , 

G. II. Pomeroy. 

W. Jenkins 

J Jenkins 

IVT. M. Jenkins.. 

H. Jenkins 

D. R. 8parks. . . 
A. D. Sparks.. . 
M. A. M. Sparks 



18 



25 

August 4 



>ept. 



8ept. 8 



July 



October 5 



.26 



70 76 
115 20 
57 60 
14 40 
28 80 
48 00 
96 00 
96 00 
57 60 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
86 40 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
28 80 
28 80 
76 80 
76 80 
76 80 
76 
57 60 
57 60 
38 40 
57 60 
57 60 
67 20 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
96 00 
96 00 
67 20 
57 60 
60 50 
53 40 
57 60 
57 60 
57 6o 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 



24 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



1095 
1096 
1097 
1098 
1099 
1100 
1101 
1102 
1103 
1104 



! nw qi 
ne qr. 
se qr . 
uw qr 
sw qr . 
nw qr 
sw qr . 
nw qr 
nw qr 
; sw qr . 
llOSine qr. 
1106|sw qr. 
1107 1 ne qr. 
1108 nw qr 
1109 1 se qr . 
lllOisi sei 



1111 
1112 
1113 
1114 
1115 
1116 
1117 
1118 
1119 
1120 
1121 
1122 



ne qr 
nw qr 
sw qr . 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr . 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr . 
nw qr 



1123 ne qr 
1124 
1125 

1126iswqr, 



nw qi 
ne qr. 



1127 
1128 
1129 
1130 
1131 
1132 
1133 
1134 
1135 
1136 
1137 
1138 
1139 
114.0 
1141 
1142 
1143 
1144 
1145 
1146 
1147 
1148 
1149 



se qr . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
sw qr. 
nw qr 
sw qr . 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
ne qr, 
nw . . 
ne qr. 
nw qv 

ilW (II' 

ne qr. 
inv qr 
ne qr. 

qr . 
iw (ir 
ne (|r. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 



32 
34 
34 
35 
35 
34 
34 
33 
31 
31 
10 
4 
8 
8 
8 
22 
20 
20 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
9 
9 
9 
9 
32 
28 
28 
33 
34 
26 
25 
26 
27 
22 
8 
30 
26 
26 
28 
!8 
28 
28 
28 
24 
24 
14 
28 
1 
2 
22 
22 
22 



95 33 
94 39 
34 
33 



99 



33 
48 
47 
36 
36 
33 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
99131 
99 31 



99 33 



94 39 
8() 37 



99 [48 
98130 
98 
99 
99 
09 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

160 00 

161 97 

162 80 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

206 80 

207 60 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

159 69 

160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
1(50 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
167 67 
167 27 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
364 43 
366 30 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 



360 00 
465 30 
467 10 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
480 00 
600 00 
600 00 

359 30 

360 00 
300 00 
360 00 
360 00 
3(50 00 
360 00 
600 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
377 26 
376 36 
360 00 



Name of Lessee. 



W. D. Sparks 

W. Best 

B. C. Best 

VI. J. Best 

W. E. Best 

Z. Boyd 

L. A. Boyd 

J. Doefest 

F. M. Miles 

J. Rogers 

N. J. Boyd 

E. A. Andrew 

V. G. Carmichael . . 

J. W. Bovard 

480 00 1 L L. Townsend . . . . 

420 00 If. Harvey 

480 00! W. T. Mathews . . . . 
480 00 M. M. Mathews . . . . 

C. Beardsley 

W. Nemier 

H. Niemann . . . 

M. Niemann 

C. Niemann 

M. H. Niemann 

L. L. Niemann 

L. C. Niemann 

E. F. Niemann 

J. and S. Flyau 

E. Sontliworth 

L. M. Southworth. . 

J. S. Stnro-is 

N. A. Sturgis 

E. A. Best. 

E. L M. Best 

M. L. Best 

W.Best &D.B.Sparks 

IL n. Beach 

Al. Gag-e 

E. W. Miller 

J. H. Utcliman 
W. H. Utclnniin 

F. Utchman 

n. J. Utchman. 
W. Lf'ving.... 

J. Lcving 

A. Gusti'ne 

K. IT()l)S()!i, Jr. . 
A. W. Samson. 
W. Hobson .... 
C. H. Bauer . . . 

IL Roov 

IL R. Rooy 

W. U. Rooy .... 



Date of 
Lease 



Oct. 26. 



July 1. 



Oct. 81. 
Noy. 7. 
16 



Noy. 16. 



Dec. 2. 



30 



3(50 00 C. Rooy 
360 OOIE. Rooy 



Jau 18,'69 
Dec31,'68 





$ 38 40 114 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 

57 60 
28 80 
28 80 

58 30 
58 60 
28 80 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
76 80 
67 20 
76 80 
76 80 
28 80 
74 44 
74 72 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
57 60 
76 80 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
38 40 
48 00 
96 00 
28 74 
57 60 
57 00 
57 60 
57 60 
28 80 
28 80 
48 00 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
30 18 
30 10 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80, 



Ui 
14 
14' 
14 i 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

14 
14, 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 



No. 16.] 



95 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



1150 
1151 
1152 
1153 
1154 
1155 
1156 
1157 
1158 
1159 
1160 
1161 
1162 
1168 
1164 
1165 
1166 
1167 
1168 



pin 



sw qr 
ue qr. 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr . 
sw qr. 
sw qr 
se qr. 
se qr . 
ehf neqr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
se qr. 
ne qr 
11 w qr 
se qr. 
Il69|sw qr 

1170 se qr. 

1171 nw qr..l 2 



99 



33 



41 
41 

42 
42 
42 
42 
97148 



1172|ne qr. 



1173 
1174 



nw qr. 
nw qr. 



1175 ne qr. 



1176 
1177 
1178 
1179 
1180 
1181 
1182 
1183 
1184 
1185 
1186 
1187 

4188 
1189 
1190 
1191 
1192 
1193 
1194 
1195 
1196 
1197 
1198 
1199 
1200 
1201 
1202 
1203 



nw qr . . 

s hf se qr 
sw qr. . . 
nw qr. . 
nw qr. . 

hfseqr 
se qr . . 
n e qr . . 
sw qr.. 
nw qr. 
sw qr,. 
ne qr & 
hf se qr 
e hf se qr 
sw qr., 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
uw qr 
se qr. 
sw qr, 
nw qr 
11 e qr. 
DW qr 
sw qr. 
ue qr. 
se qr. 
wlifseqr|32 
^sw qr.. .|28 



97 
86 
94 
100 
93 
93 
94 
94 
94 
94 
86 
86 
87 
86 
87 
87 
87 



48 
42 
36 
34 
48 
48 
37 
39 
39 
39 
42 
42 
42 
41 
40 
41 
41 
97 48 



22 
18 
18 

21 
32 
33 
14 
14 
14 
14 
4 
4 
4 
32 
33 
29 
.129 
2 



87138 
86i41 
92 1 46 
98 29 



98 

99 
94 
94 
87 
87 
87 
87 
85 
86 
98 
94 
94 
95 



Name of Lessee. 



160 00 f 360 OOjL. Rooy 



95{30 
9340 
9433 
87 38 



160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
138 40 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
164 23 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
148 40 
147 60 

120 00 
80 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 001 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
162 35 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
80 00 
160 00 



61»0 00 1 H. D. Hatch . 
600 00|d. C. Hatch.. 
600 00 L. R. Hatch.. 
S. L. Hatch.. 
B. B. Coloiu. 
H. Muoger . . 
P. Dean 



600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
480 00 

480 00 1 H. Banm 

600 OOjF. A. Gajlorcl. 
240 00 
360 00 
480 00 
480 00 
311 40 
360 00 
360 00 
360 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
615 86 



Date of 
Lease. 



D'c.31,'68 
Fb. li;69 



Mar. 



T. Puckett I ". 16 

H. G. Day I Apr. 1 

J. R. Sayers |. . . 

M. Sayers I " 

G. V. Brackett | .22 

B. Miller . 
J. Mais. . . 
J. Kuaeble 

D. Care "..29 

S. Care . . . 
R. An]-!er]y 

A. Row May 



600 00 T. Hay ward. 



600 00 
600 00 
480 00 
480 00 
420 00 
600 00 
840 00 
840 00 C 
420 00 
600 00 
720 00 
600 00 
333 90 
332 10 



Wm. G. Mathews. 

M. Mathews 

S. S. Mead 

H. Keith 

A. R. Fnlton 

J. Booth 

J. S. Wiley 

Snvder 

B. Snyder 

J. C. Moore 

W. G. Mathews . . 

J. G. Day 

H. G. Bicknell . . . 
E. H. Ballard . . . . 



270 00 T. H. Brand 

180 00 J. Rogers 

360 OOiJ. & J. Armstrong. 

600 00 J. S. Peers 

600 00 E. W. Peers 

600 00 T.W. Peers 



12 



.24 



.25 



June 



600 00 
720 00 
720 00 
365 29 
360 00 
360 00 
420 00 
420 00 
600 00 
180 00 
600 00 



A. C. Peers 

L 0. Moore 

W. T. Matthews. 
iD. A. Beardsley . 

\1 Sibley 

J. Wooley 

F. Minger 

J. U. Bariiward. 
J. Shurrinton . . . 

Hugh Wilson 

E. A. Reed 



28 80 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
38 40 
88 40 
48 00 
19 20 
28 80 
38 40 
38 40 
24 90 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
48 00 
48 00 

48 00 

49 27 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
38 40 
38 40 
33 60 
48 00 
67 20 
67 20 
33 60 
48 00 
57 50 
48 00 
26 82 
26 56 

21 60 
14 40 

28 80 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
57 60 
57 60 

29 22 
28 80 
28 20 
38 60 
33 60 
48 00 
14 40 
48 00 



96 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 



[No. 16. 





0^ 








OQ 




Leas 


o 


0) 

'J2 






Aon 


valui 


Cm 








a5 
be 






O 

d 


CO 


o 
d 


o 


O 

d 


3.2 














1 


^ n{\A 
15i04 


ne qr 


10 


86 


42 


160 00 


$ 600 00 


i OC\K 
l^UO 


nw qr . . . 


10 


86 


42 


160 00 


600 00 




sw qr 


10 


86 


42 


160 00 


600 00 




sw qr 


32 


87 


41 


160 00 


6U0 00 




ne qr 


2 


86 


41 


164 03 


615 11 




ne qr 


8 


97 


48 


IdO 00 


480 00 


1210 




8 


86 


41 


160 00 


720 00 


1211 


sw qr 


13 


97 


48 


160 00 


480 00 


1212 


ehf sw qr 


28 


99 


48 


160 00 


80 00 


1213 


n e qr . , . 


36 


87 




160 00 


600 00 


1214 




28 


86 


43 


160 00 


600 00 


1215 


ne qr 


28 


86 


43 


160 00 


600 00 


1216 


sw qr 


36 


87 


45 


160 00 


600 00 


1217 


ne qr 


36 


87 


45 


160 00 


600 00 


1218 




36 


87 


45 


160 00 


600 00 


1219 


nw qr. . . 


36 


87 


45 


160 00 


600 00 


1220 


sw qr 


36 


97 


48 


160 00 


480 00 


1221 


w hf neqr 


28 


94 


36 


160 00 


240 00 



Name of Lessee. 



A.L. Heed 

J. Reed 

M. Reed 

H. H. Merrick... 

W. R. Gresjg 

T. N. Keitn 

\V. H. Johnston . . 

S. Lindy 

J. JNielson 

Cox 

H. F. Scott 

W. H. Scott 

F. Holtzelaw 

H. Miller 

H. Miller F. Holtzelaw 

J. W. Sutherland 

W. Lumpkin 

J. R. Strow 



Date of 
Lease. 



June 30 



July 



12 

21 

23 

Auo:. 23 



Sept. 27 





^: 




o 
t> 


a Qj 


fl ; 

cS : 


a s 




• 

a : 


■< 


; 


$ 48 00 


$14! 


48 00 


14 i 


48 00 


14; 


48 00 


141 


49 20 


14) 


38 40 


14! 


57 60 


14 r 


88 40 


14 i 


14 40 


14 i 




141 - 


48 00 


14- 


48 00 


14; 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


48 00 


14 


38 40 


14 


19 20 





The following is a list of forfeited Leases thai have been re-leased, tlie lands being 
included in th£ foregoing list, but not the interest received when re-leased. 



No. of Lease. 


Parts of Sec. 


1 No. of Sec. 1 


Township. 


1 Range. | 


No. of Acres 


Total valua- 
tion. 


1222 


sw qr 


24 


94 


28 


160 00 


$ 408 00 


1223 


nw qr. . . 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


403 20 


1224 


iihf sw qr 


26 


99 


34 


80 00 


201 60 


1225 


slif sw qr 


26 


99 


34 


80 00 


201 60 


1226 


sw qr 


36 


100 


34 


160 00 


403 20 


1227 


ne qr 


26 


99 


34 


160 00 


403 20 


1228 




26 


99 


34 


160 00 


403 20 


1229 


ne qr 


36 


91 


37 


160 00 


680 00 


1230 


sw qr 


30 


91 


36 


165 33 


702 55 


1231 




20 


91 


37 


160 00 


680 00 


1232 


sw qr 


22 


91 


37 


160 00 


672 00 


1233 


sw qr 


8 


90 


37 


160 00 


672 00 


1234 


sw qr 


4 


89 


31 


160 00 


600 00 


1235 


se qr 


32 


98 


33 


160 00 


408 00 


1236 


lie qr 


22 


95 


30 


160 00 


400 00 


1237 


ne qr 


25 


94 


28 


160 00 


552 00 


1238 




25 


94 


28 


160 00 


552 00 


1239 


nw qr. . . 


26 


94 


28 


160 00 


552 00 


1240 


se qr 


26 


94 


28 


160 00 


680 00 


1241 


nw qr. . . 


36 


94 


28 


160 00 


680 00 


1242 


se qr 


2 


94 


28 


160 00 


680 00 


1243 


sw qr 


2 


94 


28 


160 00 


680 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease 



Amount re- 
ceived. 


Entrance fee 


$ 32 65 


|i4 


32 25 


14 


16 12 


14 


16 12 


14 


32 25 


14 


32 25 


14 


32 25 


14 


54 40 


14 


5(} 20 


14 


54 40 


14 


53 76 


14 


53 76 


14 


48 00 


14 


32 64 


14 


32 00 


14 


44 16 


14 


44 16 


14 


44 16 


14 


54 40 


14 


54 40 


14 


54 40 


14 


54 40 


44 



July 



W. M. Timmens 

J. Barker 

J. W. Barker.. 

G. E. Pullen.. . 
( ). C. Arkle .... 
E. Whitcombe.. 
T. Pullen " 

H. Sheriff 

D. T. Howell .... 
T. O. Connell.... 

E. B. Idc 

Knaresbro 

D. A. liigcrsol . . . 

H. Halverson 

H. A, Butterworth 
P. S. C artcrman . . 
J. L. Cartman. . . . 
H. I. Eartlock . . . 
W. V/. Creasman. . 

J. Eysaman 

J. Kreysor 

E. Hemming 



10 



Sept. 



10 

27 

August 1 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT— Continued. 

















cc 
cS 

<v 


<v 
W. 


d 






'P 




lJ 


Cm 


cc 










O 
O 


arts c 


0. of 


owns 


ange. 


O 

6 


r-| 

o 






^ 


H 


Ph 




M 


1 0/(/( 


sw qr. 


24 


94 


32 


1 (K(\ no 
lou uu 


JL-QAA nn 
!|idou Uu 




se qr. 


36 


96 


32 


1 fio no 
iDU uu 


QAA nn 
oDU uu 


1 Oztii 


sw qr . 


28 


97 


30 


1 fto no 

IDU uu 


AO A nn 
'±,o4t uu 


1 0^7 
i/6'± < 


ne qr. 


29 


97 


30 


1 ftO OO 
IDU uu 


AO A nn 

4,04: UU 


1 OzLR 
1,0 "lO 


se qr . 


29 


97 


30 


1A0 00 

lou uu 


AO A nn 
^lO^ UU 


1 0zLO 


ne qr. 


20 


96 


32 


1 fiO 00 
IDU UU 


/II A nn 
4biD uu 


1,C0U 


ne qr. 


36 


96 


32 


1 ftO AO 
IDU UU 


/( 1 A nn 
41D UU 




se qr . 


7 


95 


30 


1 f?n OO 

IDU uu 


QAn no 
oDU UU 




sw qr. 


35 


95 


30 


1 fiO 00 
IDU uu 


/<Q9 OO 




se qr . 


21 


95 


30 


1 ftrv OO 
IDQ uu 


AO A OO 
4/i4 uu 


1 OKA 


ne qr. 


21 


95 


30 


1 ftO OO 
IDU uu 


AO A OO 
4/04 UU 


1 9^1^ 


ne qr. 


29 


96 


30 


1 fiO 00 
IDU uu 


QAO 00 
ODU UU 


1 OKR 


se qr . 


28 


90 


32 


1 ftO OO 
IDU uu 


AQQ on 

Doo uu 


l<iO i 


sw qr. 


28 


90 


32 


1 AO OO 
IDU uu 


AQQ no 

Doo UU 




se qr . 


10 


95 


31 


1A0 00 
IDU uu 


AO A 00 
4,04 UU 




ne qr. 


25 


96 


27 


1 RO OO 
IDU UU 


A Q9 OO 
40/0 UU 


1 9Rn 


se qr . 


25 


86 


27 


1 AO OO 
IDU UU 


/1Q9 OO 
4o,^ UU 


1 9ft1 


sw qr. 


25 


96 


27 


1 AO OO 
IDU UU 


/fQ9 on 

40/0 UU 


1 9A9 


seqr . 


29 


96 


27 


1 AO no 

IDU uu 


QAn nn 
oDU uu 




sw qr. 


30 


90 


32 


1 AO OO 
IDU UU 


AQQ nn 

Doo UU 




sw qr . 


24 


90 


28 


1 AO nn 
IDU uu 


/j OA AA 

4oU UU 




seqr . 


25 


95 


28 


1 An no 

IDU uu 


QAn nn 
oDU uu 




nw qr 


26 


97 


29 


1 AO OO 
IDU uu 


QAn nn 
oDU uu 


1 9A7 


sw qr . 


26 


97 


29 


1 AO on 

IDU uu 


QAn nn 
oDU uu 




nw qr 


7 


95 


30 


10 1 oi 


/< 1 A Q7 
410 o < 




ne qr 


10 


95 


31 


1 AO nn 

IDU uu 


/19/f nn 
4,04 uu 


1 970 
1.41 i\) 


nw qr 


3 


95 


36 


1 79 01 

1 yi 


/L/IO i^A 
44y OD 


1 971 


sw qr. 


3 


95 


36 


1 An nn 

IDU uu 


/fi A nn 

41D uu 


1 979 


ue qr. 


34 


85 


29 


1 AO nn 

IDU uu 


A(\A 00 
4D4 UU 


1 97Q 


se qr . 


34 


85 


29 


1 AO nn 

IDU uu 


/tAJ no 

4D4 UU 


1 97/1 


nw qr 




OO 


90 

,oy 


1 An nn 
IDU uu 


9Q9 nn 

/oo,o uu 


1 97'^ 
l-C 4 


sw qr 


34 


85 


29 


1 AO nn 
IDU uu 


9Q9 on 

/so,o uu 


1 97ft 
1/0 ( D 


nw qr 


12 


98 


34 


1 AO nn 

IDU uu 


Ann nn 

4UU uu 


1 977 
1,0 i i 


se qr . 


34 


97 


27 


1 An no 
IDU uu 


/f 1 A nn 

4iD uu 


1 97ft 


ne qr. 


34 


97 


27 


1 AO no 

IDU uu 


/1 1 A nn 
410 uu 


1279 


nw qr 


35 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1280 


sw qr . 


35 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1281 


sw qr. 


23 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1282 


nw qr 


26 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1283 


ne qr. 


27 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1284 


se qr . 


27 


97 


27 


160 00 


416 00 


1285 


nw qr 


33 


98 


29 


160 00 


416 00 


1286 


nw qr 


28 


97 


30 


160 00 


424 00 


1287 


nw qr 


20 


96 


30 


160 00 


400 00 



Name of Lessee. 



Date of 
Lease. 



O > 

O V, 



o 
a 

;h 

_@ 

$14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

, 14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
,14 

■14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 



P. R, Bockstater. 

J. Timmeijs 

John Dore 

M. Carrie 

A. Carrie 

P. Murpliy 

G. Murphy 

C.E. Rice 

P. Cruder 

C. A. Mander. . . 
A. P. Mander . . . 

T. A. Rice 

J, Eberwein 

E. Folkers 

C. V. Rice 

A. Rolphe 

P. A. Rolphe . . . 

S. Rolphe 

J. Vogran 

S. B. Prindle . . . 

D. M. Crane 

J. Price 

M. Shuey 

A. A. Shuey 

A. C. Call 

S. Call 

J. P. Colby 

M. Colby 

H. Durant, Jr. . . 
J. C. Heckart . . . 

J. Heckart 

A. Heckart 

E. Saverton 

W. R. Brock 

P. V. Brock 

A. Williston . . . . 
M. A. Williston . 

H. C. Dodd 

J. M. Daggett. .. 
A. Simonds ... . 
J. A. Simonds . . 
J. P. Blardale . . 
C. A. Ingham. . . 
A. Booth 



Aug. 1. 
Oct.' 2.' 



21 



25 



Nov. 26. 



NOY. 



Dec. 8. 
16 



$28 80 
28 80 
33 92 
33 92 
33 92 
33 28 

33 28 
28 80 

34 56 
33 92 
33 92 
28 80 
55 04 
55 04 

33 92 

34 56 
34 56 

34 56 
28 80 
55 04 
38 40 
28 80 
28 80 
28 80 
33 34 
33 92 

35 96 
33 28 
37 12 
37 12 
18 56 
18 56 

32 00 

33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 28 
33 92 
32 00 



13 



98 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16. 



N 



REPORT OF LAND AGENT.— Continued. 

The following is a list of leases upon which the purchase money has leen paid and 
patents issued, the money received not being included in the foregoing list. 



Name of Patentee. 



Date of 
payment. 



266 
1006 
1007 
1008 
1009 
1004 
1005 
11 



ne qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr. 
se qr,. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
nw qr 
ne qr . 



160 00 
160 00 
179 76 
160 00 
178 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



240 00 
360 00 
404 46 
360 00 
400 68 
480 00 
480 00 
280 00 



Stephen Grady. . 

John Carney 

John Carney 

John Carney 

John Carney 

John Carney Jr. 

E. B. Carney 

H. J. Burver . . . 



1869. 
July 28. 
Nov. 3. 



Dec. 



List of lands leased by Thos. J. Stone^ agent employed by the Board at Sioux City, 
being a part of the lands acquired through investment of a portion of the interest 
•accumulated from Congressional Grant. 



Date of 
Lease. 



No. of Sec. 


Townsllip. 


Range. 


No. of Acres 


24 


93 


36 


160 


00 


24 


93 


36 


160 


00 


34 


93 


36 


160 


00 


34 


93 


36 


160 


00 


34 


93 


36 


180 


00 


32 


93 


36 


160 


00 


26 


53 


36 


160 


00 


26 


93 


36 


160 


00 


28 


93 


36 


160 


00 


20 


90 


40 


160 


00 


20 


90 


40 


160 


00 


20 


90 


40 


160 


00 


20 


90 


40 


160 


00 


18 


90 


40 


160 


00 


18 


90 


40 


100 


00 


34 


90 


41 


160 


00 


34 


90 


41 


160 


00 


30 


91 


43 


160 


00 


30 


91 


43 


160 


00 


36 


90 


41 


160 


00 


34 


90 


41 


160 


00 


12 


99 


38 


160 


00 


12 


99 


38 


160 


00 


12 


99 


38 


100 


00 


12 


99 


38 


160 


00 



Name of Lessee. 



1869. 
June 24. 



June 9. 



June 12. 



June 4. 



June 5. 



May 31. 
June 5. 

Aug. * * a 



nw qr 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
e hf 
nw qr. 
sw qr. 
se qr.. 
sw qr. 
se qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr . . 
nw qr 
ne qr . 
se qr. . 
se qr. 
sw qr 
se qr.. 
ne qr. 
sw qr. 
ne qr. 
ne qr. 
se qr. 
nw qr. 
sw qr. 



James Gilmore 

Eliza Gilmore 

Joseph R. Noel 

Alphonso B. Williams. 



David W. Noel 

Marion Sibley 

Leveret C. Barber 

Edwin W. Yaw 

Ambrose S. Yaw 

Jolui Cook 

John F. Potter 

Tlios. H. Harding 

Jas. Will, Jr 

Erastus B. Bailey 

Erastus B. Bailey 

Edmund S. Carr 

Geo. H. Drake 

A. J. Graves 

Chas. S. Pierce 

W. W. Fitzpatrick 

P. L. Porter 

Wm. H. Fife 

Wm. J. Fife 

Geo. W. Fife 

Chas II. Fife 



$ 2 50 


$ 32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


16 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 50 


32 


00 


2 25 


28 


80 


2 25 


28 


80 


2 25 


28 


80 ' 


2 25 


28 


80 j 


2 25 


28 


80 i 


2 25 


28 


80 1 


2 25 


28 


80 


2 25 


28 


80 1 


2 00 


25 


60 ' 


2 00 


25 


60 


2 25 


28 


80 , 


2 25 


28 


80 1 


2 00 


25 


00 


2 00 


25 


60 


2 00 


25 


60 


2 00 


25 


00 



Total amount received $713 60 

The above is a true copy of returns made semi-annually to my ofTlce. 

II. M. THOMSON, Secretary. 



No. 16.] AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 99 



CASHIER'S REPORT, 



Statement of tTie Cashier of business done by tTie various Committees, by tJie Farm 
Superintendent, and by Mmself upon the President's order, as shown upon his 
books, from January 1, 1868, to December 31, 1869, w 



Iowa State Agricultural College and Farm in account with — 

INTEHEST FUND. 

Total receipts $77,118.13 

FIRES. 

Total disbursements $ 2,526.08 

^ In 1868 $1,004.97 

In 1869.. 1,521.11 

Value of coal on hand 300.00 

CABINET. 

Total disbursements , 452.24 

BEPAIBS. 

Total disbursements 195.94 

Total receipts 132.60 

Excess of disbursements 63.34 

LAUNDRY. 

Total disbursements 1,014.10 

Total receipts 963.96 

Excess of disbursements 50.14 

LIBRARY, 



Total disbursements 



49.45 



100 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



LIGHTS. 

Total disbursements $ 883.10 

In 1868 $241.91 

In 1869 591.19 

SALARIES. 

Total disbursements 12,246.28 

In 1868 2,554.17 

In 1869 9,692.11 



SAFK^ 

Total receipts (State appropriation) 1,200.00 

Total disbursements 916.75 

Excess of receipts $283.25 

SURVEYING INSTRUMENTS 

Total disbursements 499.40 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Total disbursements 900.00 

COLLEGE TEAM. 

Total disbursements 346.35 

TUITION. 

Total receipts (for instruction in instrumental 

music) 270.50 

FURNITURE. 

Total disbursements 14,463.27 

Total receipts (for damages) 42.85 

Excess of disbursements 14,420.42 

ORNAMENTAL GROUNDS 

Total disbursements 1,045.22 

Total receipts (State appropriation) 1,000.00 

Excess of disbursements 45.22 



No. 16.] AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. IQI 

OBGHARD. 

Total disbursements $ 94.61 

8EWEB. 

Total disbursements 1,297.66 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS. . 

Total disbursements 10.70 

MUSEUM 

Total disbursements 1,700.00 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Total disbursements 5,175.40 

In 1868 $2,632.36 

In 1869 2,543.04 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND STATIONEBY. 

Total disbursements 30,267.75 

Total receipts 2,224.75 

Excess of disbursements.... 802.00 
Value of goods on hand..?802.00 

PBOFESSOBS' HOUSES. 

Total disbursements |19,244.97 

Total receipts (State appropria- 
tion, overdrawn.) 1^,005.62 

Excess of disbursements. ... 7,239.35 

SO UTH SIDE B OAD. 

Total receipts (State appropriation) $300.00 

Total disbursements 74.35 

Excess of receipts 225.65 

COLLEGE BUILDING. 

Total disbursements 37,189.65 

In 1868 .....$27,076.59 



102 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



For completion of build- 
ding 10,5Y0.79 

For heating apparatus 

and cooking range . $10,339.89 

For bell 184.11 

For water-works .... 1,354.98 

For gas-works 3,011.58 

For out-buildings 630.46 

For inside fitting up. . Y93.42 

For cleaning 191.36 

In 1869 (for all purposes) . .$10,113.06 

Total receipts $25,489.70 

In 1868 25,127.75 

State appropriation for 
completion of col- 
lege building 13,000.00 

State appropriation for 
heating apparatus 
and cooking range.. .10,000.00 

State appropriation for 

procuring water, etc 2,000.00 

Sale of household goods 127.75 

In 1869, rebatement on freights 361.95 ' 

Excess of disbursements $11,699,95 

NURSERY. 

Total disbursements 238.33 

SIOUX CITT LANDS 

Total disbursements 15,926.55 

COLLEGE BOARDING HOUSE. 

Total disbursements 17,599.25 

Total receipts 16,240.92 

Excess of disbursements... 1,358.33 

Deficit in 1868 364.63 

Deficit in 1869 693.70 

Yalue of goods on hand 300.00 



JTo. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



103 



FABM FUND. 

rotal receipts $5,672.24 

Amount drawn from 

treasury $2,702.25 

Land sales and collec- 
tions on land notes. . 2,969.99 

Total disbursements 23.10 

Balance due H. M. 

Thomson, Jan. 1, '68 13.10 
Amount paid treasurer 10.00 

Excess of receipts; $5,649.14 

FABM IMPR YEMEN TS. 

Total disbursements $1,013.87 

FABM II0BSE8. 

Tofal disbursements $1,021.25 

Total receipts 670.00 

State appropriation . . 500.00 
Sale of two horses . . 170.00 
Excess of disbursements 351.25 

FABM BUILDING FUND. 

State appropriation unexpended. $1,000.00 

FABM TILE DBAINING. 

Total disbursements 1,054.41 

Total receipts 1,004.00 

State appropriation. .. 1,000.00 

Sale of tile 4.00 

Excess of disbursements. . . . 50.41 

FABM STOCK 

Total disbursements 4,279.00 

Total receipts 3,439.03 

Excess of disbursements 839.97 



104 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

Excess of disburse- 
ments in 1868 ^2,318.39 

Excess of receipts in '69 1,478.42 

FUND FOR BEFITTING AND BE-FURNISHING FABM-E0U8E. 

Total disbursements $1,665.18 

Total receipts (State appropria'u), . 1,500.00 

Excess of disbursements' S165.18 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND WAGONS. 

Total disbursements ... 2,059.85 

Total receipts 1,309.22 

State appropriation 1,200.00 

Collect's for damage, etc 109.22 

Excess of disbursements 730.63 

FABM B OABDING HO USE. 

.Total receipts 3,155.54 

Total disbursements 2,923.60 

Excess of receipts $231.94 



FABM PB OD UCTIONS 

Total disbursements 991.59 

Total receipts 394.39 

Excess of disbursements 597.20 

FABM LAB OB. 

Total disbursements 3,804.19 

Total receipts 1,141.83 

Excess of disbursements 2,662.36 

FABM IMPLEMENT SHED. 

Total receipts (State appropria'n) . . 750.00 

Total disbursements 439.26 

Excess of receipts 310.74 

FABM INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Total disbursements. . 572.35 



ISTo. 16.] AGRICULTURAL COLLEaE. I IQ5 

PERSONAL ACCOUNTS. 
Balance due from the College. . . $ 476.84 

GASH. 

Total receipts t. ?60,131.Y8 

Total disbursements 59,524.71 

Cash on hand 1607.07 

SUMMARY. 

IOWA STATE A.GBIGULTUBAL COLLEGE AND FAJRM. 

Dr. 



To interest fund $77,118.13 

To Safe appropriation 283.25 

To tuition 270.50 

To farm building fund . 1000.00 

To balance of personal accounts 475.84 

To South side road 225.65 

To farm fund 5,649.14 

To farm boarding house 231.94 

To farm implement shed 310,74 

Total $85,565.1 9 

Cr. 

By fires $2,526.08 

By cabinet 452.24 

By repairs 63.34 

By laundry. 50.14 

By library 49.45 

By lights , 833.10 

By salaries 12,246,28 

By surveying instruments 499.40 

By musical instruments 900.00 



14 



106 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



Bj college team $346.35 

By furniture 14,420.42 

By ornamental grounds 45.22 

By orchard 94.61 

By sewer 1,297.66 

By chemical apparatus 10.70 

By museum 1,700.00 

By incidental expenses 5,175.40 

By school books and stationery 802.00 

By professors' houses 7,239.35 

By college building 11,699.95 

By nursery 238.33 

By Sioux City lands 15,926.55 

By college boarding-house 1,358.33 

By farm improvements 1,013. 87 

By farm horses 351.25 

By farm tile drainage 50.41 

By farm stock 839.97 

By fund for refitting and re-furnishing farm 

house 165.18 

By farm implements and wagons 730.63 

By farm productions ... 597.20 

By farm labor 2,662.36 

By farm incidental expenses 572.35 

By cash 607,07 



Total $85,565.19 



Summary statement of current expenses for 18G0, ( tlie first year of the fuU 
organization of tlie College. 

For fires, being for coal and fireman's wages $1,221.11 

For laundry, being deficit in receipts 50.14 

For lights, being for candles, gasoline, and 

manufacture of gas 591.19 

For salaries, being for payment of officers. 9,692.11 

/ 



To. 16.] AaRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 107 

•"or incidental expenses, being for 1st, 
expense account, and per diem of exec- 
utive committee. 2d, expense account 
and per diem of the committee on or- 
ganization. 3d, expense account of 
other officers when travelling on spe- 
cial duty. 4:th, printing. 5th, station- 
ery, 6th, postage. 7th, janitor's salary. 
8th, blank books. 9th, clerks' hire. 
10th, miscellaneous expenses not prop- 
erly chargeable to other accounts..., $2,543.04 

Tor college boarding-house, being for deficit 



in receipts 693.70 

[Total 14791.29 
►^duct tuition for instruction in instrument- 
al music 270.50 
Total, paid from interest fund $14,520.79 
1868. 
or fires, as above . , $1004.97 
or lights, as above ... 241.91 
or salaries, as above 2,554.17 

^or incidental expenses, as above 2,632.36 

^'or college boarding-house, as above 364.63 

Total paid from interest fund . . . $6798.04 



Nummary Statement of Expenditures, ordinary, for Library, Apparatus, etc., and for 
goods on hand undiminisTwd in value, for the yea/rs 1868 and 1869. 

Tor fires, being for coal on hand for next 

year's use $ 300.00 

Tor cabinet, being for freight on mineral 
specimens and for expense of botanical 

collection 452.24 

Tor library, being for purchase of books 

and express charges 49.45 



108 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



For surveying instruments $ 499,40 

For musical instruments, being for two 

pianos, one organ, covers and stools. . 900.00 
For college team, being for one pair of 

horses, harness, shoeing, etc 346.35 

For chemical apparatus, being for freight 

on apparatus donated 10.70 

For museum, being amount paid Dr. J. 

M. Shaffer for his collection in natural 

history 1,700.00 

For school books and stationery, being 

for balance of stock on hand for sale 

to students 802.00 

For college boarding-house, being value of 

groceries onhand for next year's use. . . 300.00 

Total paid from the interest fund. .... $5,360.14 



Summary Statemen of Expenditures, extraordinary, fm' completion of College building 
etc., for the years 1868 and 1869. 



For repairs, being for excess of cost of re- 
pairs of college building and its furniture 
over collections for damages $ 63.84 

For furniture, for the College building 14,420.42 

For ornamental grounds, being for excess of 

disbursements over the appropriation 45.22 

For orchard, being for trees, planting and 

care 94.61 

For sewer, being for the sewerage and drain- 
age of the College building 1,297.66 

For professor's houses, being for excess of 

disbursements over the appropriation 7,239.35 

For College building, being for its comple- 
tion, supplying it with water, heating and 
cooking apparatus, gas, cases for cabinet 
and museum, out-buildings, inside fitting- 
up and cleaning ; excess of disbursements 
over appropriation and other receipts 11,699.95 



5To. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



109 



^or nursery, being for advances made for 
evergreens ordered from France $ 238 J 



■ 



Total f35,098.88 

Deduct from the above — 

xcess of appropriation for safe over dis- 
bursements 283.25 

xcess of appropriation for south side road 

over disbursements 225.65 

Total 508.90 



Excess of overdrafts, loaned and paid tempo- 
rarily from the interest fund, by order 

of the Board of Trustees $34,589.98 



Investment of surplus Interest Fund for the years 1868 and 1869. 

For Sioux City lands being for cost and expenses inci- 
dent to their purchase and location $15,926.55 



Summary 8tatem£nt of Farm Accounts for the years 1868 and 1869. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

For farm improvements, being for the build- 
ing and repair of fences and gates, building 
and repair of sheep sheds, repair of barn, 
building of slaughter-house, etc % 1,013.87 

For farm horses and harness, being for ex- 
cess of disbursements over appropriation 
and receipts for horses sold.. 351.25 

For farm tile drainage, being for excess of 
disbursements over appropriation, and re- 
ceipts for sale of tile 50.41 



110 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16; 



For farm stock, being for excess of dis- 
bursements over receipts, and including 
the cost price and freight thereon of fine 
stock bought, and the milk and meat furn- 
ished the College boarding-house ; but 
not accounting for feed or care, nor for 
milk and meat used at the farm boarding 



house $ 839.97 

For refitting and refurnishing farm house, 
being excess of disbursements over appro- 
priation 165.18 

For farm implements and wagons, being for 
excess of disbursements over appropria- 
tion and other receipts 730.63 

For farm productions, being for excess of 
purchases over sales, but not accounting 
for the cost of raising, or the use of such 
productions on the farm 597.20 

For farm labor, being for excess of pay- 
ments to farm laborers, over receipts for 
services rendered College, and not account- 
ing for their board 2,662.36 

For farm incidental expenses, being^ for 
part payment of executive committee's ex- 
penses, when visiting the farm, for 
horse shoeing and other miscellaneous 
expenses not properly chargeable to 
other accounts 572.35 

Total Dr. balance $6,983.22 

RECEIPTS. 

From farm fund, being amount of drafts 
on that fund in treasury and of collec- 
tions on sales of Story and Boone county 
lands 5,649.U 

From farm building appropriation, being 
amount of appropriation drawn, yet un- 
expended 1,000.00 



No. 16.L 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Ill 



For farm boarding-house, being excess of 
receipts, over disbursements, but not 
accounting for board of farm laborers or 
for milk, meats, fuel or vegetable product- 
ions raised on the farm $231.94 

For farm implement shed, being excess of 

appropriation over disbursements 310.74: 

Total Cr. balance $7,191.82 

Balance due farm on account , . , , $208.60 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Current e:xpenses for 1868 , $ 6,798.04 

[Current expenses for 1869 14,520.79 

Ordinary expenditures for library, etc 5,360.14 

Extraordinary expenditures for completion of 

college building, etc 34,589.98 

Investment of surplus interest fund 15,926,55 

Cash on hand 607.07 



Total $77,802.57 

RECEIPTS. 

Interest fund 177,118.13 

Farm 208.60 

Personal accounts 475.84 



Total $77,802.57 

Eespectfully submitted. 



GEO. W. JONES, Cashier. 



112 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. 



TEEASUHEE'S EEPORT. 



OFFICE OF TREASURER OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES ) 
Of Iowa State Agricultural College and Farm, >• 
Des Molnes Iowa, January 15, 1870. ) 

To ISsm. A. S. WELCH, President of Iowa State Agricultural 
College and Farm : 

Sir. — In compliance with your request of yesterday, I have pre- 
pared from my annual reports of !1868 and 1869, the following 
report of the receipts and disbursements, and balance in treasury 
in fhe several funds under the guardianship and control of the 
Board of Trustees of the Iowa State Agricultural College and 
Farm, for the two years commencing January 21, 1868, and closing 
January 10, 1870. In making up this report I have not entered 
into detail as in my annual reports, but have as much as possible 
studied brevity. In the endowment interest-fund account, no note 
is made of the purchase or sale of bonds for that fund, as such 
bonds were purchased or sold at par, and does not change the val- 
ue but only the character of the amount on hand. Of the $80,- 
609.61 of endowment interest fund paid out, $15,926.55 was for the 
purchase and location of 15,013^^0- acres of land scrip, and cannot 
properly be accounted an expenditure, being an investment made to 
increase the fund. 

The additional sum of $14,163.27 of this same fund was expen- 
ded in the purchase of furniture for the college building, no pro- 
vision being made by the General Assembly for drawing from the 
general revenue of the State, the amount required to purchase the 
furniture necessary to prepare the building for the reception of stu- 
dents. As this fund could not properly be expended for this pur- 
pose, it can only be considered as a loan and must be replacedJ 
There has also been expended of this fund for various other pur-1 
poses, the sum of $13,279.21, which also is to be considered as a 



No. 16.] 



AGKIOULTURAL COLLEGE. 



113 



loan, and nriust be replaced at as early a day as possible, making an 
p,ggregate of $43,669.06 expended for other purposes than that 
"or which the fund is intended, leaving the actual proper expendi- 
ure in this fund during the two years ending January 10, 1870, 
36,910.58—, instead of $80,609.64:, as appears by my report. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL E. EANKIN, 

Treasurer of Board of Trustees of Iowa State Agricultural College and Farm. 



3am'l E. Rankin, in Account with the Iowa State Agricultural College Building 
Fund, from Jan. 2\st, 1868, to Jan. 10th, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 
Ian. 21. To voucher paid by L. P. Sherman, 

former Treasurer $2,527.00 

27. To amount transferred from Farm 

Fund 416.55 

Tune 9. To appropriation from State to 

complete building 10,000.00 

Total amount received $12,973.55-$12,973.55 

1868. Cr. 

an. 21. By amount overdrawn from L. P. 

Sherman $ 133.80 

26. By amount paid Chairman Build- 
ing Committee 1,000.00 

^ay 12. By amount paid Chairman Build- 
ing Committee 1,500.00 

"une 5. By amount paid Chairman Build- 
ing Committee 4,500.00 

Lug. 13. By amount paid Chairman Build- 
ing Committee 2,000.00 



as cash from former Treasurer. 2,527.00 



ran. 1. By amount of voucher received 
ca 
15 



114 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

11. Bj amount transferred to fund for 
purchasing heating apparatus, 
etc 2,000.00 



Total amount expended $13,660.80-$13,660.80 



Amount overpaid ^687.25 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in Account icitJi Fund for Procunng Boad on south side of 
Farm, from Jan, 21st, 1868, to Jan. 10th, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 
May 29. To special appropriation from State. ?300.00 



Total amount received $300.00— $300.00 

1869. Cr. 
Dec. 7. By amount paid Cashier of Board, 

Geo. W. Jones $300.00 



Total amount expended • $300.00— $300.00 



Sam'l E. Rankin in account tdth Fund for farm implements, repaiHng fences, etc.y 
from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropriat'n from State $1,200.00 
1869. 

Jan. 11. To amount transferred from Farm 

Fund 1.25 



Totvil amount received $1,201.25— $1,201.25 

1868. Cr. . . \ 

Sept. 22. By amount paid RW. Humphrey $1,200.00 j 
22. By amount paid exch'g on above 1.25 

Total amount expended $1,201.25— $1,201.25 



Ko. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



115 



8am'l E Ramkin in account with Fund for purchase of safe to preserne books and 
records, from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropria'n from State ?1, 200.00 

Total amount received $1,200.00— $1,200.00 

1869. Cr. 

Jan. 12. Bj ara'nt paid Hon. Jno. Rnssell |1,200.00 

Tutal amount expended $1,200.00— $1,200.00 



Sam'L E. Rankin in account with Fund for purchase of Horses and Harness 
from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive 

1668. Dr, 
May 29. To special appropria'n from State % 500.00 

Total amount received $ 500.00—$ 500.00 

1868. Cr. 

Jan. 27. By. amount paid exchange $ 1.25 

1869. 

Jan. 11, By amount transfer'd to farm fund 498.75 

Total amount expended $ 500.00—$ 500.00 



SAMUEL E. Rankin, in account with Fund for purchase of farm-house furniture^ 
from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. , ■ 

May 29. To special appropriation from 

State.... $1,500.00 

Total Amount received.. $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

1868. Cr. 
June 2. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thomson $500.00 



HQ AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16 

June 5. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thompson $ 500.00 

1869. 

March 18. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thompson 500.00 

Total amount expendsd $ 1,500.00— $1,500.00 



Samuel E. Rankin, in account with Fund for huilding shed for farm machinery 
and cellar for roots Jrom January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, in/ilusia>e. 

-1868. Dr. 
May 26. To special appropriation from 

State % Y50.00 

'Total amount received $ 750.00 % 750.00 

1869. Cr. 
Sept. T. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thompson % 750.00 

Total ameunt expended $ 750.00—$ 750.00 



Samuel E. Rankin, in account with Fund for luilding Stables, granary and tool 
house, from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusiw. 

1868. Dr. 
May 29. To special appropriation from 

State 12,500.00 



Total amount received $2,500.00— $2,500.00 

1868. Or. 
June 26. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thomson $ 500.00 



Total amount expanded $ 500.00— 500.00 

Balance in treasury $2,000.00 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in Account with Fund for Building Hog-House^ Corn- Crib, and 
Hen- House, from Jan. 2\st, 1868, to Jan. 10th, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropriation from State $800.00 
1870. 

Jan. 8. To amount transferred from Farm 

Fund 500.00 

Total amount received ?1,300.00-$1,300.00 

1868. Cr. 
June 27. By amount paid Hon. H. M. Thomson $500.00 

Total amount expended $500.00— $500.00 

Balance in Treasury $800.00 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in Account with Fund for Tile Braining Fa/rm,from Jan. 21st, 
1868, to Jan. l^th, 1870, iTiclusive. 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropriation from 

State $1,000.00 

Total amount received $1,000.00~$1,000.00 

1868. • Cr. 

Aug. 26. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thomson $1,000.00 

Total amount expended $1,000.00-~$1,000.00 



i 

llg AGRICULTUEAL COLLEaE. [No. 16. j 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in Account with Fund for Payment for extra work on College 
Bitilding and expenses conmcted tliereioitTi, from Jan. 21st, 1868, to Jan. 10th, 
1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropriation from 

State $3,000.00 

Total amount received $3,000.00— $3,000.00 

1868. Cr. 

Oct. 26. By amount paid Hon. Jno. Kussell . $3,000.00 

Total amount expended $3,000.00—13,000.00 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in account with Fund for grading and laying out grounds, pro- 
curing and planting trees and erecting necessary out-buildings, from January 
21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive. 

1868 Dr. 

May 29. To special aippropriation from State.$l, 000.00 



Total amount received l,000.00~$i,000.00 

1868 Cr. 

July 10. By amount paid Hon. H. M. 

Thomson $ 200.00 

1869. 

Dec. 7. By amount paid Prof. G. W, Jones, 

cashier.. 800.00 



Total amount expended. . . 1,000.00— $1,000.00 



No. 16. ! 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



119 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in account with Fund for procuring water^ constructing cistern 
and providing cloclc and hell, from January 21, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive 

1868. Db. 

May 29. To special appropriation from State$2,000.00 

Total amount received 2,000.00-$2,000.00 

1868. Dr. 

Sept. 11. By amount paid Hod. Jno.Russell.|2,000.00 

Total Amount expended... 2,000,00— $2,000.00 



Sam'l E. Rankin, in account with Fund for erecting Professor^ Iwuses^ from Janua/i^y 
21, 1868, to January 18, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. - Db. 

May 29. To special appropriation from 

State $13,000.00 

Total amoiit received.. 12,000.00— $12,000.00 

Or. 

Aug. 13. By amount paid Hon. Jno. 

Russell , $ 8,000-00 

Sept. 11. By amount paid Hon. Jno. 

Russell 3,000.00 

1869. 

June 9. By amour t paid Hon. Jno. 

Russell ■ 6,000.00 

June 9. By ex. chg. on last above amount 5.62 

Total amount expended ... $12,005.62--$12,005.62 

Amount overpaid .... $5.62 



120 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[No. 16. * 



Sam'l E. Rankin in account with Fund for purchasing Mating apparatus^ cooking 
range, etc., from January 21, 1868, to Januanry 10, 1870. 

1868. Dr. 

May 29. To special appropriation from 

State 110,000.00 

1869. 

Jan. 11. To amount transferred from Col- 
lege building fund 2,000.00— 112,000.00 



Total amount received $12,000.00 

1868. Cr. 

June 3. By am't paid W. A. Pennell % 2,000.00 

July 11. By am't paid Hon. Jno. Russell.. 10,000.00 

Total am't of expenditures $12,000.00— $12,000.00 



Sam'l E. Rankin in account loith Iowa State Agricultural College Farm Fund 
from January 21si, 1868, to January 10, 1870, inclusive. 

1868. Dr. 

Jan. 21. To currency and voucher cf L. P. 

Sherman, former treasurer % 4,156.07 

Dec. 5. To am't on land contract 320.00 

1869. 

3an. 11. To am't transferred from horse 

and harness fund 498.75 

Total amount received % 4,974.82—$ 4,974.82 

1868. Cr. 

Jan. 21. By am't paid J. W. Williams 85,00 

Jan. 27. By am't transferred to Agr. Col- 
lege building fund 339.25 

March 6. By am't paid Hon. B. F. Gue, 
J. C. Cusey, and R. W. 

Humphrey 50.00 



No. 16. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 121 

May 12. By am't paid J. C. Cusey $ 14.00 

May 13. By am't paid Hon. H. M. Thom- 
son, and express chgs on same 501.00 

May 14. By am't paid A. J. Graves 209.95 

Uune 2. By am't paid Hon. H. M. Thom- 
son... 14.00 

Sept. 22. By am't paid Hon. R. W. Hum- 
phrey, and exchange on same.. 2,502.50 



1. By am't of voucher received of 

former treasurer 50.00 

11. By am't transferred to Farm 

Implement fund 1.25 

. By am't paid Hon. B. F. Gue... 34.50 

. By am't transferred to fund for 

hog-house, corn-crib, etc 500.00 

Total am't expended 4,301.75— 4,301.75 



Balance in Treasury 673.07 



Samuel E. Rankin in accmntioith Endowment Interest Fund, from January 21, 
1868, to January 10, 1870, 



Dk. 

To bonds and currency received 

of L. P. Sherman $43777.96 

4. To amount received of Greorge 

W. Bassett 5626.43 

12. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett, per B. F. Gue 60.00 

13. To interest received on Story 

county bonds 6C3.80 

6. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett ; 4617.52 

12 



122 AGrJCULTURAL COLLEGE. [Ko. IG. Jy, 

Oct. 6. To R mount received of Geo. W. j 

Baseett $8081.94 

Dec. 21. To ?.moiint received of Geo. W. 

Bassett 4915.86 

1869. 

J;4n. 1. To interest received on Iowa State 

bonds... 714.00 

April 6. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett 8393.86 

May 19. To interest received on Story 

county bonds 534.70 

July 1. To interest received on »^10.000, 

7 per cent Iowa State bonds. . . 353.50 
July 6. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett 6404.74 

July 12. To amount received of Thos. J. 

Stone 553.60 

Sept. 24. To amount received of Hon. B. 

F. Gue 300.00 

Sept. 28, To interest received on Story 

county bonds 97.20 

Oct. 11. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett 9627.32 

Dec. 31. To amount received of Geo. W. 

Bassett 6595.51 

1870. 

Jan. 1. To interest received on Iowa State 

bonds 441.00 

Jan. 8. To amount received of Thos. J. 

Stone 160.00 



Total amount received ^101,858.94$10185S.^'4 

1868. Oil. 

Jan, 27. By amount paid Hon. Peter 

Melendy $ 145.81 



N"o. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



123 



Jan. 27. By amount transferred to Col- 
lege Building fund $ 107.00 

Mar. 5. By amount paid Hon. B. F. 

Gne 15000.00 

Mar. 6. By amount paid Hon. B. F. 

Gne, and excha,nge 538.75 

May 12. By amount paid J. D, Strow, 

per B. F. Gue.... 60.00 

May 13. By amount paid H. M. Thom- 
son 3.60 

June. 15. By amount paid Hon. Peter 

Melendy 229.00 

June. 16. By amount paid Dr. J. M. 

I Shseffer 1500.00 

July 6. By amount of receipt duplicated 

to Bassett per B. F. Gue.. 60.00 
July 28. By amount paid Hon. B. F. 

Gue, with exchange ' 6007.50 

Aug. 10. By amount paid Mills & Co.. . 54:.50 
Sept. 24. By amount paid President A. 

S. Welch 500.00 

Oct. 11. By amount, paid President A. 

S. Welch 1000.00 

Oct. 26. By amount paid President A. S. 

Welch 500.00 

Nov. 23. By amount paid Hon. Peter 

Melendy 265,00 

Nov. 24. By amount paid President A. S. 

Welch 1,000.00 

Nov. 28. By amount paid President A. S. 

Welch 812.50 

Nov. 28. By amount paid Prof A E Foote 375.00 
Dec. 7. By amount paid Hon. Jno. Rus~ 

• sell, with exchange 5,002.98 

Dec. 11. By amount paid Prof. A. S. 

Townshend 500.00 



124 



AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 16 





1 1 

XX. 


rltr Qmnnnf v\ain l-^ff\f I-J-oa AA/ 
XjV diLLlUlXLlv Ud/ltl XXUl. \Tfc/U. TT • 










$2,000.00 


Dec. 


11. 


By amount paid Hon. H. M. 










171.87 


1869. 








Jan. 


12. 


Bj amount rro. Ueo. W. Jones, 










1,500.00 


Jan. 


12. 


J3y amount paid Hon. H. M. 










201.28 


Jan. 


14. 


X^ * 1 XX X^ 

J3y amount paid Hon. B. h (rue, 








with exchange 


6,976.86 


Jan. 


16. 


By amount paid Dr J. M ShaefFer 


200.00 


Jan. 


27. 


By amount paid Hon. H. M. 










901.12 


Feb. 


12. 


By amount paid Hon. B. F. Gue 


7.50 


Feb. 


27. 


By amount paid Gr. W. Jones, 








csh'r with expr s'ge and exch'ge 


2,003.62 


Mar. 


30. 


rJy amount paid U. VV. Jones, 








^ 1 : 


1 t AA AA 

l,oUU.UU 


April 20. 


i>y amount paid (jr. W. Jones, 








cashier, with exp. and exchange 


1,503.33 


May 


8. 


By amount paid G. W. Jones, 










1,502.15 


June 


1. 


±>y amount paid G. W. Jones, 










2,750.00 


June 


1. 


By amount paid Prof. A. E. Foot, 


375.60 


June 


5. 


1 'TUT* A 

iJy amount paid Miss Augusta 










83.34 


June 


5. 




214.00 


June 


9. 


By amount paid J. C. Cusey... 


-t f\r\r\ A A 

1,000.00 


June 


20. 


By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 










2,167.2d 


July 


3. 


By amount paid Prof. IN. b. 










1,000.00 


July 


30. 


By amount paid G. W. Jones, 










1,500.00 



To. 16.] AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 125 

lept. 6. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exchange $4,587.77 

Sept. 28. jBj amount paid express charges 

on Story county bonds 2.00 

)ct. 5. By amount paid express charges 

on bonds and currency 3.85 

)ct. 13. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exchange 1,501.50 

Tov. 10. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exch. and exp. .. 3,504.00 
^ov. 16. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier 500.00 

^ov. 17. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exchange 1,501.88 

)ec. 7. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exchange 1,501.25 

!)ec. 24. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

cashier, with exchange 3,001.87 

24. By amount paid Miss A. Math- 
ews 284.70 

1870. 

Jan. 4. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

Cashier, with exchange 1,501.88 

7. By amount paid Geo. W. Jones, 

Cashier 1,500.00 

Total amoant expended f80,609.64-$80,609.64 

Balance endowment interest fund in Treasury $21,249.30 



Of the above balance of $21,249.30 of the endowment interest 
fund remaining in the Treasury, there is invested in State and 
30unty bonds as follows, viz. : - 

Iowa 7 per cent State Stocks, due January 

1st, 1881 $13,600.00 

Story county Y per cent Bonds, due July 

let, 1869 4,650.00 



126 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 

Whole amount invested in State and county 

Bonds. |18,150.00-?18,150 



Cash balance endowmentrf'nnd in Treasury |3,099 



GENERAL BALANCE. 

1870. Dr. 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in Agricultu- 
ral College building fund. .S 12,973.55 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 

road on south side of farm. 300.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 

farm implements, etc.. ^. 1,201.25 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 

purchase of safe 1,200.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 

purchase of horses & harness 500.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 
purchase of farm-house furn- 
iture 1,500.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 
building shed for farm 
machinery, etc 750.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 
building stables, granery 
and tool house 2,500.00 

Jan 10. Tu total receipts in fund for 
building hog-liouso, corn-crib 
and hen-house 3,300.00 

Jan. 10. To total receipts in fund for 

tile-draining tarm . . . , . . 1,000.00 

Jan. 10. To tot-al receipts in fund for 
extra work on college build- 
*ng, etc 3,000.00 



] AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. ^27 

10. To total receipts in fund for 
grading,layiijg out groonds, 
etc., etc .. . $1,000.00 

10. To total receipts in fund for 
procuring water, construct- 
ing cistern, etc 2,000.00 

10. To total receipts in fund for 

erecting Professor's houses. 12,000.00 

10. To total receipts in fund for 
heating apparatus, cooking- 
range, etc 12,000.00 

10. To total receipts in farm fund. 4,974.82 

10. To total receipts in endow- 
ment interest fund 101,858.94 

Total receipts §160,058.56— $160,058.56 



Ck. 

10- Bj total disbursements in Ag- 
ricultural College building 
fund $ 13,660.80 

10. By total disbursement in fund 
for road on south side of 
farm 300.00 

10. . .By total disbursements in fund 

for f;^-rm implements, etc.. 1,201.25 

10. By total disbursements in fund 

for purchase of safe 1,200.00 

10. By total disbursements in fund 
for purchase of horses and 
harness 500.00 

10. Bj total disbursements in fund 
for purchase of fam-house 
furniture 1,500.00 



128 AGRICULTUEAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

Jan. 10. Bj total disbursements in fund 
for building shed for farm 

machinery, etc $ 750.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for building stable, granery 

and tool-house 500.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for hog-house, corn-crib and 

hen house 500.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 

for tile-draining farm 1,000.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for extra work on college 

building, etc 3,000.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for grading and laying out 

grounds, etc , 1,000.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for procuring water, con- 
structing cistern, etc 2,000.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for erecting Professor's 

houses 12,005.62 

Jan. 10. By total disbursements in fund 
for heating apparatus, cook- 
ing-range, etc 12,000.00 

Jan. 10. By total disbursement in col 

lege farm fund 4,301.75 

Jon. 10. By total disbursement in en- 
dowment interest fun4 80,609.64: 



Total disbursements. .$136,029.06~$136,029. 



Total balance bonds and currency $ 24,029.50 

Deduct amount invested in State and f 
County bonds 18,150.00 

Cash balance in treasury $ 5,879.50 



No. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



129 



APPENDIX. 



That the General ALSsemblj may be fully apprised of the relations 
existing between the State, the United States, and the Agricultural 
College, I herewith present for their examination a copy of the 
act of Congress granting lands to the State ; also reference to the 
act of the General Assembly, accepting the grant with all its con- 
ditions, resolutions, etc. 

COLLEGE GRANT. 

Congress passed an Act donating public lands to the several 
States and territories which may provide colleges for the benefit 
[)f agriculture and the mechanic arts,* which was approved July 
2d, 1862, in the following terms : 

" Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Bepresentatives of the 
United States in Congress assembled^ That there be granted to the 
several States for the purpose hereinafter named, an amount of the 
public land, to be apportioned to each State, a quantity equal to 
thirty thousand acres for each senator and representative in Con- 
gress to which the States are respectfully entitled, by the appor- 
tionment, under the census of 1860: Provided^ That no mineral 
lands shall be selected under the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 2. And he it further enacted^ That the land aforesaid, after 
being surveyed, shall be apportioned to the several States in sec- 
tions or sub-divisions of sections, not less than one-quarter of a 
section ; and whenever there are public lands in a State subject to 
sale at private entry at one dollar twenty-five cents per acre, the 
quantity to which said State shall be entitled shall be selected from 
such lands within the limits of such State, and the Secretary of the 
Interior is hereby directed to issue to each of the States in which 

17 



130 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



LNo. 161 



there is not the quantity of public lands subject to sale «t private 
entry at one dollar twenty -five cents per acre, to which said State 
DQay be entitled under this act, land scrip to the amount in acref 
for the deficiency of its distributive share ; said scrip to be sold bj, 
said States and the proceeds thereof to be applied to the uses and 
purposes prescribed in this act, and for no other use or purpose^ 
whatever : Provided^ That in no case shall any State to which land 
scrip may thus be issued, be allowed to locate the same within thei 
limits of any other State, or of any territory of the United States.] 
but their assignees may thus locate said land scrip upon any of the^ 
unappropriated lands of the United States subject to sale at privates 
entry at one dollar and twenty-five cents or less per acre; and] 
Provided further^ That not more than one million acres shall be^ 
located by such assignees, in any of the States ; and Providedi\ 
further^ That no such location shall be made before one year fromi^ 
the passage of this act. ^ j 

Sec. 3. And he it further enacted^ That all the expenses ofv 
management, superintendence, and taxes from date of selection of 
said lands previous to their sale and all their expenses incurred ini^ 
the management and disbursement of the moneys, which may be^ 
received therefrom, shall be paid by the State to which they majrjj 
belong, out of the treasury of said State, so that the entire pro-> 
ceeds of the sales of said lands shall be applied without anyj 
diminution whatever to the purposes hereinafter mentioned. , 

Sec. 4. And he it further enacted^ That all moneys derived fromi; 
the sale of the lands aforesaid by the States to which the lands are* 
apportioned, and from the sale of land-scrip hereinbefore provided:: 
for, shall be invested in stocks of the United States, or of the States,^, 
or some other safe stocks, yielding not less than five per centum upoac 
the par value of said stocks ; and that the money so invested shall 1 
constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever i 
undiminished, (except so far as may be provided in section fifth of I 
this act), and the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated i 
by each State, which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to . 
the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college^ , 
where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific ; 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such t 



To. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



131 



)ranclies of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic 
irts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respect- 
velj prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical educa- 
ion of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
.f life. 

Sec. 5. And he it further enacted, That the grant of land and 
md-scrip hereby authorized shall be made on the following condi- 
Lons, to which, as well as to the provisions hereinbefore contained ; 
be previous assent of the several states shall be signified by legis- 
itive acts : 

First — If any portion of the fund invested as provided by thefore- 
oing section, or any portion of the interest thereon shall, by any 
ction or contingency, be diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by 
le State to which it belongs, so that the capital of the fund shall 
amain forever undiminished, and the annual interest shall be regu- 
irly applied, without diminution, to the purposes mentioned in the 
mrth section of this act ; except that a sum not exceeding ten per 
entum upon the amount received by any State under the provisions 
f this act, may be expended for the purchase of lands for sites or 
xperimental farms, whenever authorized by the respective legisla- 
ires of said States. 

Second. — No portion of said fund, nor the interest thereon, shall 
B applied directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to 
le purchase, erection, preservation or repair of any building or 
lildings. 

Third. — Any State which may take and claim the benefit of the 
revisions of this act may provide, within five years, at least not 
ss than one college, as described in the fourth section of this act, 
• the grant to such State shall cease ; and said State shall be bound 
pay the United States the amount received of any lands previous- 
sold, and that the title to purchasers under the State shall be 
.lid. 

Fourth. — An annual report shall be made regarding the progress 
each college, recording any improvements and experiments made, 
ith their cost and result, and such other matters, including State, 
dustrial and economical statistics, as may be supposed useful ; one 



1-32 AGRICULTUKAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

copy of which shall be transmitted by mail free by each to all the 
other colleges which may be endowed under the provisions of this 
act, and also one copy to the Secretary of the Interior 

Fifth. — When lands shall be selected from those which have been 
raised to double the minimum price, in consequence of railroad grants, 
they shall be completed to the State at the maximum price, and the 
number of acres proportionably diminished. 

Sixth. — No State while in a condition of rebellion or insurrection 
agaiaist the government of the United States shall be entitled to the 
benefit of this act, 

Seventh. — No State shall be entitled to the benefit of this act, 
unless it shall express its acceptance thereof by its legislature within 
two years from the date of its approval by the President. 

Seo. 6. And he it further enacted^ That land-scrip issued un- 
der the provisions of this act, shall not be subject to location until '; 
after the first day of January, 1863. 

Sec. 7. And he it further enacted^^ that the land officers shall 1 
receive the same fees for locating land-scrip issued under the provi- i, 
sions of this act, as is now allowed for the location of Military ' 
Bounty Land Warrants under existing laws: Provided^ theiri 
maximum compensation shall not be thereby increased. 

Sec. 8. And he it further enacted^ That the governors of thei 
several States to which scrip shall be issued under this act, shall bei 
required to report annually to Congress all sales made of such scrip! 
until the whole shall be disposed of, the amount received for theii 
same and what appropriation has been made of the proceeds. (U. 
S. Stat. 1861-2, p. 503.) 

The Ninth General Assembly, convened in extra session by proi 
clamation of the Governor, passed an act — approved September 11 
1862 — entitled '•''[An act to accept of the grant and to carry into exe 
cution the trust conferred upon the State of Iowa hy an act of Cory 
gress^'' entitled " An act granting public lands to the several StaUi 
and territories which may provide colleges for the henefit O) 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, approved July 2, 1862." Th< 
State thereby accepted the grant upon the conditions and under thi' 
restrictions contained in said act of Congress, and required th 
Governor to appoint an agent to select and locate the land grantet' 



^0. 16.] 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



183 



D said act, and providiDg that no lands shall be selected under said 
jrant that are claimed by any county as swamp lands, requiring 
aid agent to report to the Governor and making it the duty of the 
jovernor to lay the list of selections before the board of trustees 
f the Agricultural College at their next meeting for their approv- 
1 etc.; and appropriating $1,000.00 to carry out the provisions of 
he act. (Acts Ex. Session, 18G2, p. 25.) 

The State having eight senators and representatives in Congress 
hus becomes entitled to 240,000 acres of land for the purpose of 
stablishing and maintaining in this State an agricultural college. 

It will thus be seen that with an endowment sufficient to support 
nd maintain a college educating five hundred students, we have 
nly a limited accommodation for one-third that number. The 

Iiith of the State is pledged for the inviolate preservation of the 
rincipal and that the interest shall only be used as provided in the 
ct of Congress above quoted. As we have appealed to the Gen- 
ral Assembly for the means to erect more buildings, it is but just 
nd right that the exact position we are placed in should be mada 
jnown to every member thereof. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

H. M. TROMSOlSr, Sec. to Board of Trmtees. 



No. 16.1 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



135 



INDEX. 



ACT OF CONGRESS, MAKING GRANT OF LANDS FOR ESTAB- 
LISHMENT OF COLLEGE 129 

ADMISSION— 

Conditions of 37 

AGRICULTURE— 

Course of Study in \ 10 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES— 

List of 5 

Officers of 5 

BOOK-KEEPER, OFFICE OF CASHIER, and 32 

BOOKS AND VOUCHERS— 

Examined 67, 69 

BUILDING COMMITTEE— 

List of 5 

Report of, for 1868 53 

Cleaning building 57 

College building 53 

Disbursements 57 

Gas-works 56 

Heating apparatus and cooking range 54 

Inside fittings 57 

Out-buildings 57 

Professors' houses 53 

Receipts 57 

Safe 56 

Water, clock and bell 55 

Report of, for 1869 58 

College building 61 

Heating apparatus 58 

Professors' bouses 60 

Sewerage 59 

Stable 61 



136 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

BUILDINGS— 

Dormitory 30 

Kind of, needed 29 

More, needed 27 

CASHIER AND BOOK-KEEPER— 

Office of 33 

CASHIER— 

Books and voucliers of, examined by Executive Committee 69 

General summary of accounts of Ill 

Report of 99 

Statement of current expenses for 1868 107 

Of current expense for 1869 106 

Of expenditures, extraordinary 108 

Of expenditures, ordinary 107 

Of farm accounts 109 

Of investment of surplus interest fund 109 

Of students' labor 24 

CLASSES— 

List of 13 

COLLEGE BUILDING— 

Building Committee's, report on 53,61 

Cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements on account of. 101 

Cleaning of 57 

Fund for payment of extra work on 118 

Fund, Treasurer's Report of. 113 

COLLEGE- 

Needs of 69 

Revenue of, from Fort Dodge land agency 71 

COMMTTEES— 

List of 5 

Report of Building 53 

Of Executive 63 

CONGRESSIONAL GRANT— 

Acceptance of, by State 132 

Act making 129 

Condition of 70 

COUNTIES— 

Representation of 6 

COURSE OF STUDY 10 

CROPS— 

In 1868 39 

In 1869 44 



No. 16.1 INDEX. 

DISBURSEMENTS— 

Of Building Committee 57 

Items of, in Cashier's statement 99 

Items of, in Treasurer's report 127 

DORMITORY BUILDING— 

Estimates for 69 

Needed 30 

EMPLOYMENT OF STUDENTS— 

Order for the day 16 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 

List of 5 

Report of, for 1868 63 

Fine stock purchased 64 

Report of, for 1869 65 

Books and vouchers examined 67, 69 

College, needs of 69 

Farm, condition aud needs of 67 

Farm stock, value of 68 

Instructions to Geo. W. Bassett, land agent 65 

Land Department 65 

Secretary and Superintendent, vacancy 67 

Sioux City lands 66 

FACULTY — 

List of , 6 

Salaries of 11 

FARM— 

Cashier's statement of accounts of ' 109 

Condition and needs of 67 

Fund, Cashier's statement of 104 

Treasurer's report of 120 

Horses and harness, treasurer's report of fund for 115 

House, Treasurer's Report of fund for re-fitting and re-furnishing 115 

Implement shed. Cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements, on 

account of 104 

Treasurer's report of fund for 116 

Implements, etc., Cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements on 

account of 104 

Treasurer,s report of fund for 114 

Stock, inventory of 68 

Sold in 1869 48 

Superintendent's report, abstract of, for 1868 38 

Crops 39 

Implements and wagons bought 41 

18 



138 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEaE. 



LNo. 16. 



FARM— Continued — 

Land sales 41 

Teams, bought and sold 41 

Work done 38 

Superintendent's report for 1869 41 

Crops 44 

Donations received, acknowledgments of 52 

Nursery 43 

Orchard... 43 

Stock sold 48 

Suggestions 49 

Tile drainage 43 

Work done 41 

Tile drainage, cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements on ac- 
count of 103 

Superintendent's report of 43 

Treasurer's report ot fund for 117 

GAS WORKS 56 

GOVERNMENT OP STUDENTS 14 

GRANT OF LANDS— 

Act making 129 

Condition of 70 

HEATING AND LIGHTING 33 

HEATING APPARATUS— 

Building Committee's report on - 54, 58 

Treasurer's report of fund for 120 

HOG-HOUSE, ETC.— 

Treasurer's report of fund for 117 

HOUSES, (see " Professors' houses.") 

IMPLEMENTS AND WAGONS— 

Farm, bought in 1868 41 

IMPROVEMENTS— 

Permanent 33 

INAUGURATION 7 

INSIDE FITTING OF COLLEGE BUILDING 57 

INSTRUCTION— 

Religious 14 

INTEREST FUND— 

Cashier's statement of receipts from 99 

Treasurer's report of 121 



Ko. 16.] INDEX. 139 

LABOR— 

Educational results of 20 

Further provisions needed for 25 

Manual results of 17 

Objects to be gained by 26 

Q 

Organization for 1° 

Professor s duties in regard to 27 

Students, Cashier's statement of 24 

Supervision of 19 

Systematic arrangement necessary for 27 

Value of, to College 21 

LAND DEPARTMENT— 

Executive Committee's report on 65 

Instructions to George W.'Bassett, agent 65 

Report of Geo. W. Bassett, agent 70 

Condition of the Congressional Grant 70 

Leases forfeited 73 

Leases forfeited and lands re-leased, detailed statement of 96 

Leases original, detailed statement of 74 

Revenue from Fort Dodge land agency 70 

Sales of leased lands, detailed statement of 98 

Report of Thomas J. Stone, agent ; detailed statement of leases 98 

Sioux City lands. Cashier's statement of cost of 109 

Executive committees report on 66 

LAND SALES— 

By Farm Superintendent 41 

LEASES, (see " Land Department ") 

LETTER OF SUBMISSION 3 

LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND 31 

LIGHTING 38 

MANUAL LABOR, (see ''Labor:') 

MECHANIC ARTS— 

Course of study in the 10 

MUSEUM AND LIBRARY 31 

Cashier's statement of cost of 101 

NURSERY 43 

OFFICERS OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 5 

ORCHARD 43 

ORGANIZATION— 

Additional Professors needed under full 11 

Of labor. 18 



140 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

ORNAMENTAL GROUNDS— 

Improvements made upon 23 

Cashier's statement of cost of 109 

Treasurer's report of fund for 119 

OUT-BUILDINGS 57 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT 7 

Admission, conditions of 30 

Agriculture, course of study in 10 

Buildings kind of, needed 29 

More, needed , 27 

CasMer and Bookkeeper, office of 32 

Classes, list of. 1 

Counties, representation of 

Course of study 10 

Days employment 16 

Dormitory buildings needed 30 

Government of students 14 

Inauguration 17 

Labor, educational, results of 20 

Further provisions needed tor 25 

Manual, results of 17 

Objects to be gained by 36 

Organization for 18 

Professors' duties in regard to 27 

Students, Cashier's statement of 24 

Supervision of 19 

Systematic arrangements necessary for 27 

Value of, to College 21 

Mechanical arts, course of study in 10 

Museum and library 31 

Ornamental grounds 23 

Permanent improvements, heating, etc 23 

Professors, additional needed, under full organization 18 

Duties of, in regard to the students' labor 27 

Non-resident 12 

Professors' houses 34 

Religious instruction 13 

Sewerage 22 

Steward, need of. 12 

Students, expenses of 37 

Labor of, Cashier's statement of 24 

Number of 8 

Terms and vacations 34 



No. 16.] INDEX. 241 

PROFESSORS— 

Additional needed under full organization 11 

Duties of, in regard to manual labor 27 

Non-resident 13 

PROFESSORS' HOUSES— 

Building Committee's report on 53-60 

Cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements on account of 181 

President's report on 34 

Treasurer's report of fund for 119 

RECEIPTS— 

Of building committee in 1868 57 

Items of, in Cashier's statement 99 

Items of, in Treasurer's report 126 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION 14 

REPORTS— 

Of Building Committee 53 

Of Cashier 99 

Of Executive Committee 63 

Of Farm Superintendent 38 

Of Land Agent, (Geo. W. Bassett) 70 

Of Land Agent, (Thomas J. Stone) 98 

Of President 7 

Of Treasurer 112 

REVENUE FOR 1869— 

From Fort Dodge Land Agency 70 

From Sioux City Land Agency 98 

SAFE— 

Building Committee's report on 56 

Cashier's statement of receipts and disbursements on account of 100 

Treasurer's report of fund for 115 

SALARIES— 

Of the Faculty 11 

Cashier's statement of disbursements on account of 100 

SECRETARY AND SUPERINTENDENT, VACANCY 67 

SEWERAGE- 

Building Committee's report on 59 

Cashier's statement of disbursements on account of 101 

President s report on 22 

SIOUX CITY LANDS— (See "Land Department.") 

STABLE- 

Building Committee*s report on 61 

Treasurer's report of fund for 116 



142 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [No. 16. 

STEWARD— 

Need of 12 

STOCK, FARM— 

Cashier's statemeut of receipts and disbursements on account of 100 

Estimated value of 68 

Fine, bouglit in 1868 64 

Sold, in 1869 48 

STUDENTS— 

Employment of, order for the day 16 

Expenses of 37 

Government of 14 

Number of , 8 

STUDENTS' LABOR— 

Cashier's statement of 24 

STUDY— 

Course of 10 

SUPERINTENDENT OF FARM— 

Report of 38 

TEAMS— 

Farm, bought and sold 41 

TERMS AND VACATIONS 34 

TREASURER'S REPORT 112 

Of farm fund 130 

Of fund for College building 113 

For farm horses and harness 115 

For farm house furniture, etc 115 

For farm implements, etc 114 

For farm implement shed, etc 116 

For heating apparatus and cooking range 120 

For hog house, etc 117 

For payment of extra work on college building, etc 118 

For Professors' houses 119 

For road on south side of farm 114 

For safe 115 

For stable, granary, etc 116 

For tile drainage of farm 117 

For water, clock and bell 119 

General balance 121 

Interest fund 121 

TRUSTEES— 

Board of 5 

Oflacers of Board of 5 



No. 16.] 



INDEX. 



143 



VACATIONS, TERMS, and 34 

WATER CLOCK, AND BELL— 

Building Committee's report on 55 

Supply of water 33 

Treasurer's report on fund for 119 



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